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<body>
   <script>
    ping = new Object;
    ping.test = '1234';
   </script>

<a href="#" onclick="alert(ping.test);">Test</a>
</body>

why is this working in IE8 but not in Firefox or chrome ? The popup gives "undefined" in FF v5 and Chrome v12 , it gives "1234" in IE9.

share|improve this question
    
Works for me in FF4 –  Mrchief Jul 8 '11 at 4:09
    
That should work, though many things could be improved. –  alex Jul 8 '11 at 4:10
    
You should also specified the script type: type="text/javascript" –  Pompom6784 Jul 8 '11 at 4:17
    
Mrchief, I'm using FF5 and Chrome 12. and its not working. Am I doing something illegal ? –  Benjamin Jul 8 '11 at 4:23

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's a scope issue. Try this:

<body>
   <script>
    var ping = {};
    ping.test = '1234';
   </script>

<a href="#" onclick="alert(ping.test);">Test</a>
</body>

Edit: this works for me

<body>
   <script>
    var ping = {};
    ping.test = '1234';

    function test(){
        alert(ping.test);
    }
   </script>
<a href="#" onclick="test();">Test</a>
</body>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks ilia, but still have "undefined" with Chrome V.12 and FF 5.0 –  Benjamin Jul 8 '11 at 4:18
    
use Zach's code. That is guaranteed to work. –  ilia choly Jul 8 '11 at 4:21
    
just tried with var ping = {}; still FF5 gives undefined. You guys think its a bug in FF5 and Chrome 12 ? –  Benjamin Jul 8 '11 at 4:24
    
no, definitely not –  ilia choly Jul 8 '11 at 4:34
    
Thank you ilia. I will be using this method since its working on every browsers. I'm still a bit confused as to what's wrong with passing an object in an event handler in FF5 or Chrome12. –  Benjamin Jul 8 '11 at 4:46

This is the inline event model (DOM Level 0) so only variables defined within its execution context will be used.

The following section

ping = new Object;
ping.test = '1234';

is in its own execution context when the interpreter goes through the page. Code in global scope will use the global object via this.

But here

<a href="#" onclick="alert(ping.test);">Test</a>

is a separate execution, which your browser views as an anonymous function. Using

<a href="#" onclick="alert(this);">Test</a>

Will not result in what we want. The line sees window, the this is actually being used for the current object that the inline event handler works with.

So ping is not defined within this context unless we allow it to be seen by referring to window.

<a href="#" onclick="alert(window.ping.test);">Test</a>

Now when the browser runs, it will grab the window global variable which in the (\script\) context will be the same as this and have access to to ping.test

Seen in the following browsers

  • Google Chrome Mac 12.0.742.112
  • Safari Version 5.0.5 (6533.21.1)
  • Firefox Mac 3.6.18

References
Mozilla Docs: this keyword
Dom Events: inline model

share|improve this answer
    
that answer is pure awesome –  Jim Deville Jul 8 '11 at 6:36

ping has gone out of scope. Try this:

<body>
    <a href="#" id="test">Test</a>
    <script>
    var ping = new Object();
    ping.test = '1234';
    document.getElementById("test").onclick = function() { 
        alert(ping.test);
    };
    </script>
</body>
share|improve this answer
2  
how is ping out of scope? it's a global object at that point. (other than that, i think your general coding style is much better) –  Jim Deville Jul 8 '11 at 4:12
1  
if you don't declare a variable with var, upredictable things happen to the scope. –  ilia choly Jul 8 '11 at 4:13
    
Thanks Zach, the problem is, my application is very AJAX intensive. (using jquery "live" functionality is not really my best option) –  Benjamin Jul 8 '11 at 4:21
    
You don't need to use JQuery live, if you re-select your objects in your AJAX callback function, you can accomplish the same effect. –  Zach Rattner Jul 8 '11 at 4:47
    
if you don't declare with var, it's very predictable: the variable is put onto the global object. This is part of the JS spec –  Jim Deville Jul 8 '11 at 6:36

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