Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm trying to create a Priority Blocking Queue in Java that maintains FIFO order for elements with the same priority. The Oracle doc provides some help with that, but I'm still very tangled up.

I should note that the following topics are all very new to me: Generics, Interfaces as Types, and static nested classes. All of these come into play in the following class definition. Generics, especially, are confusing, and I'm sure I've totally messed up with them here.

I have included comments to identify the compiler errors I am currently getting.

Several specific questions:

  1. Is it okay to have the class represent the queued event object, with the actual queue being a static class member?

  2. Was it reasonable to have included Oracle's FIFO event "wrapper" as a static nested class?

  3. Am I at least on the right track here, doing it all in one outer class?

Here is the class that I've written:

import java.util.concurrent.PriorityBlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicLong;

public class FIFOPBQEvent {

/**
 * First we define a static nested class which, when instantiated,
 * encapsulates the "guts" of the event - a FIFOPBQEvent - along with
 * a sequence number that assures FIFO behavior of events of like priority.
 *  
 * The following is lifted ALMOST verbatim (I added "static" and some 
 * comments) from Oracle documentation on adding FIFO-ness to a Priority
 * Blocking Queue: 
 * http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/PriorityBlockingQueue.html
 * As the Oracle doc points out:
 * 
 * "A static nested class interacts with the instance members of its outer 
 * class (and other classes) just like any other top-level class. In 
 * effect, a static nested class is behaviorally a top-level class that 
 * has been nested in another top-level class for packaging convenience."
 *
 */
static class FIFOEntry<E extends Comparable<? super E>> implements
        Comparable<FIFOEntry<E>> {
    final static AtomicLong seq = new AtomicLong();
    final long seqNum;  // instance
    final E entry;

    public FIFOEntry(E entry) {
        seqNum = seq.getAndIncrement();
        this.entry = entry;
    }

    public E getEntry() {
        return entry;
    }
    /** Here is implementation of Comparable */
    public int compareTo(FIFOEntry<E> other) {
        int res = entry.compareTo(other.entry);
        if (res == 0 && other.entry != this.entry)
            res = (seqNum < other.seqNum ? -1 : 1);
        return res;
    }
}

/**
 * Now we declare a single (static) PBQ of FIFO entries into which 
 * PBQFIFOEvents will be added and removed.
 */

/** FLAGGED AS ERROR BY COMPILER */
// Bound mismatch: The type FIFOPBQEvent is not a valid substitute for the
// bounded parameter <E extends Comparable<? super E>> of the type 
// FIFOPBQEvent.FIFOEntry<E>

private static PriorityBlockingQueue<FIFOEntry<FIFOPBQEvent>> theQueue =
    PriorityBlockingQueue<FIFOEntry<FIFOPBQEvent>>();

/** 
 * And here are the "guts" of our event: the i.d. and state of the GUI widget 
 */
private ConsoleObject obj = ConsoleObject.UNDEFINED_OBJ; // widget that was affected
private ObjectState state = ObjectState.UNDEFINED_STATE; // the widget's new state

/** 
 * Constructor specifying the class variables 
 */
public FIFOPBQEvent(ConsoleObject theObj, ObjectState theState) {
    obj = theObj;
    state = theState;
}

/**
 * Event queuing ("sending") and dequeuing ("receiving")
 */
public void sendEvent() {

    /** FLAGGED AS ERROR BY COMPILER */
    // The method put(FIFOPBQEvent.FIFOEntry<FIFOPBQEvent>) in the type 
    // PriorityBlockingQueue<FIFOPBQEvent.FIFOEntry<FIFOPBQEvent>> is not 
    // applicable for the arguments (FIFOPBQEvent)

    theQueue.put(this);
}

public static FIFOPBQEvent receiveEvent() {

    /** FLAGGED AS ERROR BY COMPILER */
    // Type mismatch: cannot convert from FIFOPBQEvent.FIFOEntry<FIFOPBQEvent> 
    // to FIFOPBQEvent

    FIFOPBQEvent event = theQueue.take();
    return event;
}

/**
 * ConsoleEvent accessors
 */
public ConsoleObject getObj() {
    return this.obj;
}

public ObjectState getState() {
    return this.state;
}

/**
 * And for the first time, enums instead of public static final ints.
 */
public enum ConsoleObject {
    UNDEFINED_OBJ,
    RESERVED,

    /** Console keys */
    RESET,
    DISPLAY_MAR,
    SAVE,
    INSERT,
    RELEASE,
    START,
    SIE,
    SCE,

    /** Console toggle switches */
    POWER,
    PARITY_CHECK,
    IO_CHECK,
    OVERFLOW_CHECK,
    SENSE_SWITCH_1,
    SENSE_SWITCH_2,
    SENSE_SWITCH_3,
    SENSE_SWITCH_4
}

public enum ObjectState {
    UNDEFINED_STATE,

    /** Toggle switches */
    OFF,
    ON,

    /** Console keys */
    PRESSED,
}
}
share|improve this question
    
FIFOPBQEvent does not implement Comparable<FIFOPBQEvent> which causes a few of your errors there. Your generic declaration of FIFOEntry requires an object that implements the Comparable interface. –  Bringer128 Jul 8 '11 at 5:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The first error is the more significant error. It occurs because the FIFOPBQEvent class doesn't implement Comparable, which it must to be considered as the generic type for the FIFOEntry nested class. This is because you restrict E and say that it extends Comparable<...>. Basically, your FIFOPBQEvent class must be comparable to provide the priority for the queue (presumably based on the event type).

To fix the error, you need to:

  1. Change the header of your class to:

    public class FIFOPBQEvent implements Comparable<FIFOPBQEvent> {
    
  2. add a compareTo method in the FIFOPBQEvent class; something like:

    public int compareTo (FIFOPBQEvent other) {
        // TODO - compare this and other for priority
        return 0;
    }
    

Then you need to wrap your entry in your sendEvent method:

public void sendEvent () {
    theQueue.put(new FIFOEntry<FIFOPBQEvent> (this));
}

The last, minor, error is simply that you aren't unwrapping the FIFOEntry object. To fix this, change receiveEvent to:

public static FIFOPBQEvent receiveEvent () {
    FIFOPBQEvent event = theQueue.take ().getEntry ();
    return event;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you - I've made the changes you noted, and have only one remaining statement being flagged: ` private static PriorityBlockingQueue<FIFOEntry<FIFOPBQEvent>> theQueue = PriorityBlockingQueue<FIFOEntry<FIFOPBQEvent>>(); ` Compiler diagnostic wants an expression between ()s. Don't know why, since PriorityBlockingQueue documents a default constructor. –  Chap Jul 8 '11 at 19:21
1  
Ah, you forgot the new. –  101100 Jul 8 '11 at 20:32

Let's step through your code.

static class FIFOEntry<E extends Comparable<? super E>> implements 
  Comparable<FIFOEntry<E>> {

This defines the class FIFOEntry which takes a generic parameter. You have constrained the type of generic parameter to "Any object that implements Comparable of itself".

private static PriorityBlockingQueue<FIFOEntry<FIFOPBQEvent>> theQueue =
  PriorityBlockingQueue<FIFOEntry<FIFOPBQEvent>>();

Your declaration of PriorityBlockingQueue is not incorrect here, but your definition of FIFOEntry<FIFOPBQEvent> is incorrect. This is because of the above point - you have restricted the type of FIFOEntry to anything that implements Comparable of itself i.e. it should be

class FIFOPBQEvent implements Comparable<FIFOPBQEvent> {

Your next problem is -

public void sendEvent() {
  theQueue.put(this);
}

The type of this is FIFOPBQEvent but the queue only accepts FIFOEntry objects. To match your Queue signature it should be:

public void sendEvent() {
  // Requires FIFOPBQEvent to be Comparable
  theQueue.put(new FIFOEntry<FIFOPBQEvent>(this));     
}

You have the same problem on receiveEvent() too - your Queue signature says that the Queue contains FIFOEntry objects and you are trying to pull out FIFOPBQEvents.

share|improve this answer
    
Without muddying my answer, generic type <E extends Comparable<? super E>> matches "Any object that implements Comparable of itself or a super class". That is, class Cat implements Comparable<Animal> matches this signature just as well as class Cat implements Comparable<Cat> –  Bringer128 Jul 8 '11 at 5:32
    
I greatly appreciate your help here. Why does the class both extend and implement the interface Comparable? I thought that one only implemented interfaces. –  Chap Jul 8 '11 at 19:28
    
A thought: might this have been easier to understand if I'd used FIFOEntry as the outer class, let that contain the static PBQ, and made FIFOPBQEntry be static nested (or inner?)? At least that would properly reflect the actual containment relationship between FIFOEntry and PBQEntry. As it is, it feels somewhat inside-out. –  Chap Jul 8 '11 at 20:15
1  
@Chap I would actually have two public classes. The first would be something like PriorityFIFOEventQueue to hold the two static methods receiveEvent and sendEvent and the wrapper class FIFOEntry (which I would make private). The second class would be the event itself, with its information and nested enums. That would decouple the events from the queue in at least one direction (the events wouldn't need to know of the queue). –  101100 Jul 8 '11 at 20:36
    
@Chap You asked why the class both 'extends' and 'implements' the interface - it doesn't. extends is the keyword used for Covariance in Java and it is similar in meaning to the extends/implements keyword but not identical. Covariance and Contravariance are Generics-only concepts and I would recommend looking these up if you want to fully understand what the compiler is thinking. –  Bringer128 Jul 11 '11 at 4:01

Taking @101100's recommendation, I have reworked the design, decoupling the queue from the events. That seems to make it much simpler and easier to understand (and reuse), but sadly I'm still unclear on some concepts. What follows here is the PriorityFIFOEventQueue (I've omitted the Event class for brevity). And I've noted where I still need some help:

package ibm1620;

import java.util.concurrent.PriorityBlockingQueue;
import java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicLong;

/**
 * This class represents a Priority Blocking Queue of FIFO entries.  Instantiating
 * it creates a queue.  It provides instance methods for sending and receiving
 * entries, a.k.a. events of type E, on the queue.
 */

The following is flagged with diagnostic: "The type PriorityFIFOEventQueue must implement the inherited abstract method Comparable>.compareTo (PriorityFIFOEventQueue)"

I'm pretty sure I don't want to compare queues !! Still not sure what I need here.

public class PriorityFIFOEventQueue<E extends Comparable<? super E>> implements Comparable<PriorityFIFOEventQueue<E>> {

/**
 * FIFOEntry is a static nested class that wraps an Entry and provides support for
 * keeping the Entries in FIFO sequence.
 */
private static class FIFOEntry<E> implements Comparable<FIFOEntry<E>> {

    /**
     * There's going to be one atomic seq per ... queue?  runtime?
     */

    final static AtomicLong seq = new AtomicLong();

    /**
     * FIFOEntry is simply an entry of type E, and a sequence number
     */
    final long seqNum; 
    final E    entry;

    /**
     * FIFOEntry() constructor
     */
    FIFOEntry(E entry) {
        seqNum = seq.getAndIncrement();
        this.entry = entry;
    }

    /**
     * Accessor method for entry
     */
    E getEntry() {
        return entry;
    }

    /**
     * Here is implementation of Comparable that is called directly by PBQ.
     * We first invoke E's comparator which compares based on priority. 
     * If equal priority, order by sequence number (i.e. maintain FIFO).
     * */

In the following, the line containing "compareTo" is flagged, and the diagnostic is "The method compareTo(E) is undefined for the type E". Apparently I haven't told the compiler that the "other" FIFOEntry implements Comparable.

    public int compareTo(FIFOEntry<E> other) {
        int res = entry.compareTo(other.entry); // priority-based compare
        if (res == 0 && other.entry != this.entry)
            res = (seqNum < other.seqNum ? -1 : 1); // FIFO compare
        return res;
    }
}

/**
 * Here is the PriorityBlockingQueue of FIFOEntries
 */

private PriorityBlockingQueue<FIFOEntry<E>> theQueue = 
    new PriorityBlockingQueue<FIFOEntry<E>>();

/**
 * Event queuing ("sending") and dequeuing ("receiving")
 */
public void sendEvent(E event) {
    theQueue.put(new FIFOEntry<E>(event));
}

/**
 * pollEvent() 
 * Will remove and return a ConsoleEvent from the queue, or return
 * null if queue is empty.
 */
public E pollEvent() {
    E event = null;
    FIFOEntry<E> aFIFOEvent = theQueue.poll();
    if (aFIFOEvent != null) {
        event = aFIFOEvent.getEntry();
        say("pollEvent() -> "+event);
    }
    else {
    }
    return event;
}

/**
 * receiveEvent() 
 * Will block if queue is empty.  Takes a FIFOEvent off the queue,
 * unwraps it and returns the 'E' payload.
 * 
 * @return
 */
public E receiveEvent() {
    E event = null;
    try {
        FIFOEntry<E> aFIFOEvent = theQueue.take();
        if (aFIFOEvent != null) {
            event = aFIFOEvent.getEntry();
            say("receiveEvent() -> "+event);
        }

    } catch (InterruptedException e) {
        say("InterruptedException in receiveEvent()");
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    return event;
}

// for console debugging
static void say(String s) {
    System.out.println("ConsoleEvent: " + s);
}

}
share|improve this answer
    
Okay - after I stopped banging my head I realized that the class definition for FIFOEvent should be: ` private static class FIFOEntry<E extends Comparable<? super E>> implements Comparable<FIFOEntry<E>> {`. (Duh - as the Oracle documentation described!) Still unsure about PriorityFIFOEventQueue definition, however. –  Chap Jul 9 '11 at 4:24
    
To understand Comparable and other interfaces, I find it is helpful to think of it as a descriptor, like flammable. So you should be able to logically say that any class that implements it is comparable. Right now, you are saying that FIFOEntrys are comparable, which makes sense. You are also saying that PriorityFIFOEventQueues are comparable, which doesn't make sense to me; why would you compare them? –  101100 Jul 9 '11 at 15:02
    
@101100 - you're right, I don't want to compare queues, so I've removed the "implements" clause. But I do want to compare "E's" - which makes me think I should write public class PriorityFIFOEventQueue<E extends Comparable<E>>. (It looks odd to me to talk about "extending" an interface, but the compiler doesn't seem to mind.) @Bringer128 tried to explain the <? super E> part to me, above, but I'm not sure I need it, either. This currently compiles and runs correctly, although I certainly need to review bounded type parameters before I'm comfortable. –  Chap Jul 9 '11 at 16:01
1  
Yes, the extends Comparable<E> is needed because you call compareTo inside FIFOEntry on an E. The <? super E> part isn't strictly needed since your events likely implement Comparable<EventClassName>. If you ever used your queue to hold Times, which implement not the exact same type, but a super type (Date), the ? super would allow that while just <E> would not. –  101100 Jul 9 '11 at 16:24
    
@101100: Hindsight - I was slightly misled by the word "Priority" in Priority Blocking Queue: I might have been better off thinking of it a "naturally-ordered blocking queue." Elements of a PBQ must be able to tell where they should appear (in front of, or behind) with respect to another element, but the details of that decision are in their compareTo() method. So..., it was not strictly necessary to use a wrapper class for FIFO maintenance -- I could have put that logic into E as part of its compareTo() logic. (But this design is admittedly convenient.) –  Chap Jul 11 '11 at 5:44

Here is an actual replacement for PriorityBlockingQueue which maintains FIFO ordering for items with equal priority. It does all the wrapping/unwrapping transparently for the user.

This code was written for a 1.4 JVM and usese the j.u.c. backport. Using it in a newer JVM and adding generics should be straightforward.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Collection;
import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.ConcurrentModificationException;
import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.NoSuchElementException;

import edu.emory.mathcs.backport.java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue;
import edu.emory.mathcs.backport.java.util.concurrent.PriorityBlockingQueue;
import edu.emory.mathcs.backport.java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit;
import edu.emory.mathcs.backport.java.util.concurrent.atomic.AtomicLong;

/**
 * A queue with all properties of a {@link PriorityBlockingQueue} but which additionally 
 * returns items with equal priority 
 * in a FIFO order.
 * In this respect, {@link PriorityBlockingQueue} explicitly gives no return order guarantees for equal priority elements.
 * 
 * This queue only accepts {@link Comparable} items. A custom {@link Comparator} cannot
 * be specified at construction time.
 * 
 *
 */
public final class FIFOPriorityBlockingQueue implements BlockingQueue {
    private final PriorityBlockingQueue q;

    public FIFOPriorityBlockingQueue() {
        q = new PriorityBlockingQueue();
    }

    public FIFOPriorityBlockingQueue(int initialCapacity) {
        q = new PriorityBlockingQueue(initialCapacity);
    }

    public boolean isEmpty() {
        return q.isEmpty();
    }

    public boolean addAll(Collection c) {
    if (c == null)
        throw new NullPointerException();
    if (c == this)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException();
    boolean modified = false;
    Iterator e = c.iterator();
    while (e.hasNext()) {
        if (add(e.next()))
        modified = true;
    }
    return modified;
    }

    /**
     * Always returns <code>null</code> as this {@link BlockingQueue} only accepts
     * {@link Comparable} objects and doesn't allow setting an own {@link Comparator} 
     * @return
     */
    public Comparator comparator() {
        return null;
    }

    public boolean containsAll(Collection c) {
        Iterator e = c.iterator();
        while (e.hasNext())
            if(!contains(e.next()))
            return false;

        return true;
    }

    public int size() {
        return q.size();
    }

    public int remainingCapacity() {
        return q.remainingCapacity();
    }

    public boolean removeAll(Collection c) {
        boolean modified = false;
        Iterator e = iterator();
        while (e.hasNext()) {
            if(c.contains(e.next())) {
            e.remove();
            modified = true;
            }
        }
        return modified;
    }

    public boolean retainAll(Collection c) {
        boolean modified = false;
        Iterator e = iterator();
        while (e.hasNext()) {
            if(!c.contains(e.next())) {
            e.remove();
            modified = true;
            }
        }
        return modified;
    }

    public Object remove() {
        return ((FIFOEntry)q.remove()).entry;
    }

    public Object element() {
        return ((FIFOEntry)q.element()).entry;
    }

    public boolean add(Object e) {
        return q.add(new FIFOEntry((Comparable)e));
    }

    public boolean offer(Object e) {
        return q.offer(new FIFOEntry((Comparable)e));
    }

    public void put(Object e) {
        q.put(new FIFOEntry((Comparable)e));
    }

    public boolean offer(Object e, long timeout, TimeUnit unit) {
        return q.offer(new FIFOEntry((Comparable)e), timeout, unit);
    }

    public Object poll() {
        return ((FIFOEntry)q.poll()).entry;
    }

    public Object take() throws InterruptedException {
        return ((FIFOEntry)q.take()).entry;
    }

    public Object poll(long timeout, TimeUnit unit) throws InterruptedException {
        return ((FIFOEntry)q.poll(timeout, unit)).entry;
    }

    public Object peek() {
        return ((FIFOEntry)q.peek()).entry;
    }

    /**
     * If more than one equal objects are held by the queue, remove() will
     * remove any one of them, not necessarily the first or last inserted.
     */
    public boolean remove(Object o) {
        return q.remove(new FIFOEntry((Comparable)o));
    }

    public boolean contains(Object o) {
        return q.contains(new FIFOEntry((Comparable)o));
    }

    public Object[] toArray() {
        Object[] a = q.toArray();
        for (int i = 0; i < a.length; i++) { // unpacking
            a[i] = ((FIFOEntry)a[i]).entry;
        }
        return a;
    }

    public String toString() {
        return q.toString(); // ok, because each FIFOEntry.toString returns the toString of the entry 
    }

    public int drainTo(Collection c) {
        ArrayList tmp = new ArrayList(size());
        int n = q.drainTo(tmp);
        for (Iterator it = tmp.iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
            FIFOEntry en = (FIFOEntry) it.next();
            c.add(en.entry);
        }
        return n;
    }



    public int drainTo(Collection c, int maxElements) {
        ArrayList tmp = new ArrayList(size());
        int n = q.drainTo(tmp, maxElements);
        for (Iterator it = tmp.iterator(); it.hasNext();) {
            FIFOEntry en = (FIFOEntry) it.next();
            c.add(en.entry);
        }
        return n;
    }

    public void clear() {
        q.clear();
    }



    public Object[] toArray(Object[] a) {
        Object[] res = q.toArray(a);
        for (int i = 0; i < res.length; i++) { // unpacking
            res[i] = ((FIFOEntry)res[i]).entry;
        }
        return res;
    }



    public Iterator iterator() {
        final Iterator it = q.iterator();
        return new Iterator() {
            public void remove() throws UnsupportedOperationException, IllegalStateException, ConcurrentModificationException {
                it.remove();
            }

            public Object next() throws NoSuchElementException, ConcurrentModificationException {
                return ((FIFOEntry)it.next()).entry;
            }

            public boolean hasNext() {
                return it.hasNext();
            }
        };
    }

    public int hashCode() {
        return q.hashCode();
    }

    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        return q.equals(obj);
    }


    /**
     * Wrapping class which adds creation ordering to a {@link Comparable} object.
     * Based on the code in the javadoc for {@link PriorityBlockingQueue}
     * 
     *
     */
    private static class FIFOEntry implements Comparable {
        private final static AtomicLong seq = new AtomicLong();
        private final long seqNum;
        private final Comparable entry;
        public FIFOEntry(Comparable entry) {
            seqNum = seq.getAndIncrement();
            this.entry = entry;
        }

        public int compareTo(Object other) {
            FIFOEntry o = (FIFOEntry) other;
            int res = entry.compareTo(o.entry);
            if (res == 0 && o.entry != this.entry)
                res = (seqNum < o.seqNum ? -1 : 1);
            return res;
        }
        public int hashCode() {
            final int prime = 31;
            int result = 1;
            result = prime * result + ((entry == null) ? 0 : entry.hashCode());
            return result;
        }
        public boolean equals(Object obj) {
            if (this == obj)
                return true;
            if (obj == null)
                return false;
            if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
                return false;
            FIFOEntry other = (FIFOEntry) obj;
            if (entry == null) {
                if (other.entry != null)
                    return false;
            } else if (!entry.equals(other.entry))
                return false;
            return true;
        }

        public String toString() {
            return entry.toString();
        }
    }

}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.