Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is some simple code that takes the id values of ".somedivs" and puts them into global variables to be sorted by the conditional statements, then to the console. Below you can see that I am getting some weird results and no matter what combination of conditionals I use I can't get it to work right. Seems so basic, I'm thinking I'm violating some law of js or i'm missing something obvious.

  $(document).ready(function(){

    $('.somedivs').mousedown(function(){
      first = $(this).attr("id");
    }).mouseup(function(){
      second = $(this).attr("id");

      if(window.first > window.second){
        var higher = window.first;
        var lower = window.second;
        var process = 1;
      }else if(window.second > window.first){
        var higher = window.second;
        var lower = window.first;
        var process = 2;
      }else if(window.first === window.second){
        var higher = window.first;
        var lower = window.second;
        var process = 3;
      }


      if(higher > lower){
        var status = true;
      }else{
        var status = false;
      }

      console.log("process = " + process + " // " + "window.first = "+window.first+" / window.second = "+window.second + " // higher = "+higher+" / lower = "+lower + " // status = "+ status  );


    });

Console output, as you can see most of the lines are returning true when they should be false, if you look at the numbers themselves. I marked some of the ones that are wrong with the arrow ">". Why is status true when it should be false?

process = 2 // window.first = 0 / window.second = 1 // higher = 1 / lower = 0 // status = true
process = 3 // window.first = 2 / window.second = 2 // higher = 2 / lower = 2 // status = false
process = 1 // window.first = 2 / window.second = 0 // higher = 2 / lower = 0 // status = true
> process = 1 // window.first = 5 / window.second = 22 // higher = 5 / lower = 22 // status = true
process = 3 // window.first = 7 / window.second = 7 // higher = 7 / lower = 7 // status = false
process = 2 // window.first = 3 / window.second = 9 // higher = 9 / lower = 3 // status = true
process = 1 // window.first = 19 / window.second = 14 // higher = 19 / lower = 14 // status = true
> process = 1 // window.first = 5 / window.second = 11 // higher = 5 / lower = 11 // status = true
process = 1 // window.first = 35 / window.second = 23 // higher = 35 / lower = 23 // status = true
process = 2 // window.first = 13 / window.second = 17 // higher = 17 / lower = 13 // status = true
process = 1 // window.first = 32 / window.second = 24 // higher = 32 / lower = 24 // status = true
process = 2 // window.first = 17 / window.second = 18 // higher = 18 / lower = 17 // status = true
process = 1 // window.first = 22 / window.second = 18 // higher = 22 / lower = 18 // status = true
> process = 1 // window.first = 8 / window.second = 11 // higher = 8 / lower = 11 // status = true
process = 1 // window.first = 18 / window.second = 14 // higher = 18 / lower = 14 // status = true
process = 2 // window.first = 3 / window.second = 6 // higher = 6 / lower = 3 // status = true
process = 1 // window.first = 24 / window.second = 16 // higher = 24 / lower = 16 // status = true
process = 1 // window.first = 9 / window.second = 15 // higher = 9 / lower = 15 // status = true
process = 1 // window.first = 31 / window.second = 26 // higher = 31 / lower = 26 // status = true
process = 2 // window.first = 24 / window.second = 28 // higher = 28 / lower = 24 // status = true
process = 1 // window.first = 41 / window.second = 30 // higher = 41 / lower = 30 // status = true
process = 2 // window.first = 13 / window.second = 19 // higher = 19 / lower = 13 // status = true
share|improve this question
    
smells like a race condition to me... but i'm not sure where –  Jim Deville Jul 8 '11 at 6:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I thinik it is because of the type of the variable:

try :

first = parseInt($(this).attr("id")); 

and

second = parseInt($(this).attr("id"));
share|improve this answer
    
seams to work, I tested it using inventpartners.com/content/javascript_is_int and it returned true, LIES! –  ThomasReggi Jul 8 '11 at 6:10
    
what's the meaning of LIES? –  Liangliang Zheng Jul 8 '11 at 6:18
    
when I used the function in the link above javascript read my variables as integers and it returned true, which was not the case, it lied. –  ThomasReggi Jul 8 '11 at 6:46
1  
I want to point it out that the function is_int() is correct. It is merely used for testing whether the value is a decimal figure or an integer. It is not for testing whether the type of value is a number or a string. –  Liangliang Zheng Jul 8 '11 at 12:20
    
thank you, very much –  ThomasReggi Jul 21 '11 at 19:49

As far as I can see, Higher would always be higher (so status should always be true) no? You're always affecting the highest value (according to the test) to higher. So except for equality (process 3), status is always true.

The problem seems more like : Why sometimes higher is not the highest number in the output?

And that's coming from the point raised by Liangliang Zheng, you're comparing strings. In order to compare strings, javascript compare them character by character, so for example in the first >

"5" is higher than "22" because, "5" is higher than "2".

If you want your code to work with the number value, then you'd use the parseInt method as suggested by Liangliang Zheng.

Edit: And if you want it to work with status being true or false depending of which is higher (and you don't care about higher/lower value) then

  var status=(parseInt(window.first)>parseInt(window.second));

should do the trick

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.