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I wrote a program in C++ with some goto statements. Now, I need to write the same program in Java. Is there any goto option in Java? If so, how it can be implemented? Is it same as the C++?

My program is:

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

void main()
{
    int i,j,k,w,l,q,d;
    clrscr();
    printf("\nEnter the limit:");
    scanf("%d",&k);
    for(i = 13; i <= k ; i++)
    {
        repeat:
        j = i%10;
        if (j != 0)
        {
            if(i < 99)
            {
                for(w = 1; w <= 9; w++)
                {
                    l = 11*w;
                    if (l == i){
                        i++;
                        goto repeat;
                    }
                }
            }
            if(i > 99)
            {
                for(q = 1; q<=9 ; q++)
                {
                    d = 111*q;
                    if (d == i){
                        i++;
                        goto repeat;
                    }
                }
            }
            printf("%d,",i);
        }
    }
    getch();
}
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marked as duplicate by Peter Mortensen, Dennis Meng, Raedwald, Irfy, iStimple Jan 22 at 1:34

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
I don't think you needed to include a code example in this question; everyone knows what a goto is. –  David Grayson Jul 8 '11 at 6:47
1  
Take a note that using goto is considered very bad practice. Also, main() should return int, not void. –  BЈовић Jul 8 '11 at 6:47
    
If you use Java and want to add a goto, use multiple inheritance or a few other things, it only means one thing: you're thinking wrong and taking the problem the wrong way. And anyway, whatever the language might be, goto is a bad way to do things, it might cause terrible bugs that could allow half-loops and other very unpleasant surprises. –  Oltarus Jul 8 '11 at 6:50
    
You could do with some refactoring. I have no idea what this program does. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jul 8 '11 at 6:56
1  
This is, in many ways, not a C++ program. –  Karl Knechtel Jul 8 '11 at 8:17

7 Answers 7

No, Java does not have a goto operator, by design. It's considered harmful.

Your code could be rewritten with continue repeat in place of the goto repeat, if the repeat: label was placed just before the for loop.

E.g.

repeat: for(i=13;i<=k;i++)

and then

continue repeat;

instead of goto repeat

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2  
There is nothing like continue repeat; It's just continue. –  iammilind Jul 8 '11 at 6:52
    
Why goto's considered harmful: david.tribble.com/text/goto.html –  Tobias Langner Jul 8 '11 at 6:54
6  
@iammilind, yes there is. It allows to continue further out than the innermost loop. java2s.com/Tutorial/Java/0080__Statement-Control/… –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Jul 8 '11 at 6:55
4  
@iammilind, I beg to differ. download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/… search for "continue test". –  Theo Jul 8 '11 at 6:56
    
@Theo, you wrote, Your code could be rewritten with continue repeat; I considered that in C++ context. Ok, I will take back the downvote. –  iammilind Jul 8 '11 at 7:02

No Java doesn't have goto in active state (but in reserved state). You cannot use it in your program for now (it's a reserved keyword).

And avoid using it in C++ either. You can write your program using smartly placed continue and/or break for both the languages.

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Not in this case. There is a gotoless construct in Java that would enable the author to accomplish what they want, but not in C/C++. The only choices are kludgy flags, which many see as being worse than goto, or a well-constrained goto, which many see as being better than those kludgy flags. –  David Hammen Jul 8 '11 at 7:22
1  
@David this is not actually the case here. The purpose of the gotos is to simply abort the current iteration of the loop so that the printf statement at the end isn't reached. This naturally translates using continue. Unless of course the OP intends to perform one more iteration of the loop in the case that k is ever equal to l or d... –  Karl Knechtel Jul 8 '11 at 8:23
    
That is the case here, and I was also alluding to the general case. The general case is to break out of or continue some outer loop. That is exactly how the OP is using goto here. This could be implemented directly in Java by substituting the goto statements with Java continue statements (which optionally take a label as an argument). C/C++ break and continue do not take an argument; they only apply to the innermost loop. –  David Hammen Jul 8 '11 at 9:22
    
What's the difference between goto and continue or break (other than at the end of a case)? They all break logical program flow, and make it more difficult to reason about things like loop invariants and such. (Of course, if the function is large enough for it to make a significant difference, it is too large. Which one could also formulate as: if the function is large enough that you're tempted to use any of these, it is too large.) –  James Kanze Jul 8 '11 at 9:30

Short answer, No.

You can also refer this question

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Java has goto keyword. –  iammilind Jul 8 '11 at 6:48
2  
yeah, but not used. Just a reserved keyword. –  chedine Jul 8 '11 at 6:50
    
const is another reserved keyword. –  Peter Lawrey Jul 8 '11 at 9:01

Although goto is a reserved word in Java it is not used in the Java language. But there is a label, an identifier that can be used in conjunction with the break or continue. The purpose of the label it to let an iteration to jump outside of the iteration, it is a bit like goto statement.

Code:

labelA:
// some loop {
    continue labelA;
}
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3  
You have almost 1000 reputations but, up to now, you don't know how to edit your post and codify your code. :S –  Buhake Sindi Jul 8 '11 at 6:50

I wrote a program in C++ with some goto statements.

No, you didn't. C++ requires that main() returns int, and <stdio.h> is a C library (and conio.h a platform-specific C library). In C++, we spell it <cstdio>, and we don't normally use it anyway (because <iostream> is much more powerful and type-safe). However, your program is valid C.

Now,i need it to write the same program in java.

Good heavens, why? To the extent that I can figure out what your program is actually intended to do, it isn't anything useful at all. If this is for homework, your teacher is doing an incredibly bad job of explaining good coding style, from what I can see.

Is there any goto option in java ?

No, goto is not implemented in Java. They did this because you don't have a reason to use it. No, really. The fact that it's all over the Linux kernel doesn't mean you have a reason. (It doesn't mean they have a real reason, either.)

Your program can be written more simply, for example:

#include<stdio.h>  
#include<conio.h>  
void main()  
{  
    int i,j,k,w,l,q,d;  
    clrscr();  
    printf("\nEnter the limit:");  
    scanf("%d",&k);  
    for(i=13;i<=k;i++)  
    {   
        j=i%10;  
        if (j == 0) continue;
        if (i<99)  
        {  
            for(w=1;w<=9;w++)  
            {  
                l=11*w;  
                if (l==i) continue;
            }  
        } 
        else
        {  
            for(q=1;q<=9;q++)  
            {  
                d=111*q;  
                if(d==i) continue; 
            }  
        }  
        printf("%d,",i);  
    }  
    getch();  
}

And the same basic approach will work in Java, too.

Although you really need to work on several other style issues. Please try to use real variable names, and restrict variable scope.

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This does not do the same thing that the OP's program does. The OP's program omits printing numbers that are a multiple of 10, 2 digit numbers that are a multiple of 11, and 3 digit numbers that are a multiple of 111. –  David Hammen Jul 8 '11 at 9:35
    
Ah, I see, the continues are currently in inner for-loops. Careless of me. Probably comes from not writing useless nonsense like this normally :) –  Karl Knechtel Jul 9 '11 at 9:00

I do condone the use of goto on occasion. This is not one of those occasions. This particular problem can be solved without any kind of goto (break and continue are a goto, just a restricted form).

#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    unsigned int lim;
    std::cout << "Enter the limit: ";
    std::cin >> lim;
    std::cout << "\n";

    if (lim > 999) {
        std::cout << lim << " is too large. Truncating to 999.\n";
        lim = 999;
    }

    // Why start at 13? Oh well.
    for (unsigned int ii=13; ii <= lim; ii++) {
        if (((ii % 10) != 0) &&
            ((ii < 100) ? (ii % 11) != 0 : (ii % 111 != 0))) {
            std::cout << ii << ",";
        }
    }
    std::cout << "\n";
    return 0;
}

There are times where the clearest way to write a chunk of code involves break or continue. There are times where the clearest way to write a chunk of code involves a multi-level break or continue. While Java does provide such a mechanism, neither C nor C++ does.

As I said at the onset, I do condone the use of goto on occasion. The occasions are very, very rare:

  • To emulate a multi-level break or continue when that truly is the clearest way to write the code.
  • To deal with errors in a stupid programming environment that mandates single point of entry, single point of return.
  • To deal with errors in a programming environment that makes try, catch, and throw forbidden keywords.
  • To implement a finite state machine (but a loop around a switch usually quite nicely in this case).
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+1 for the good uses of goto –  Carlos Muñoz Jul 9 '11 at 14:26

You can do anything with label that you could do with goto. Labels as an Anti-Pattern This doesn't make it a good idea.

What you are trying to do here doesn't need nested loops which avoids the need to use labels at all.

Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
System.out.print("\nEnter the limit:");
int limit = in.nextInt();
for (int i = 12; i <= limit; i++) {
    if (i % 10 == 0) continue;
    if (i <= 99) {
        // two digits the same.
        if (i % 10 == i / 10 % 10) continue;
    } else if (i <= 999) {
        // three digits the same.
        if (i % 10 == i / 10 % 10 && i % 10 == i / 100) continue;
    } else {
        System.err.println("Value " + i + " too large to check");
        break;
    }
    System.out.printf("%d,", i);
}
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