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Here is some code that perpetually generate GUIDs. I've written it to learn about threading. In it you'll notice that I've got a lock around where I generate GUIDs and enqueue them even though the ConcurrentQueue is thread safe. It's because my actual code will need to use NHibernate and so I must make sure that only one thread gets to fill the queue.

While I monitor this code in Task Manager, I notice the process drops the number of threads from 18 (on my machine) to 14 but no less. Is this because my code isn't good?

Also can someone refactor this if they see fit? I love shorter code.

class Program
{
    ConcurrentNewsBreaker Breaker;

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        new Program().Execute();

        Console.Read();
    }

    public void Execute()
    {
        Breaker = new ConcurrentNewsBreaker();
        QueueSome();
    }

    public void QueueSome()
    {
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(DoExecute);
    }

    public void DoExecute(Object State)
    {
        String Id = Breaker.Pop();
        Console.WriteLine(String.Format("- {0} {1}", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId, Breaker.Pop()));

        if (Breaker.Any())
            QueueSome();
        else
            Console.WriteLine(String.Format("- {0} XXXX ", Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId));            
    }
}


public class ConcurrentNewsBreaker
{
    static readonly Object LockObject = new Object();

    ConcurrentQueue<String> Store = new ConcurrentQueue<String>();

    public String Pop()
    {
        String Result = null;
        if (Any())
            Store.TryDequeue(out Result);
        return Result;
    }

    public Boolean Any()
    {
        if (!Store.Any())
        {
            Task FillTask = new Task(FillupTheQueue, Store);
            FillTask.Start();
            FillTask.Wait();
        }

        return Store.Any();
    }

    private void FillupTheQueue(Object StoreObject)
    {
        ConcurrentQueue<String> Store = StoreObject as ConcurrentQueue<String>;
        lock(LockObject)
        {
            for(Int32 i = 0; i < 100; i++)
                Store.Enqueue(Guid.NewGuid().ToString());            
        }
    }
}
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My pc has 2 cores. Is there a way to tell the ThreadPool how many threads to dedicate to my process? –  Roman Jul 8 '11 at 7:18
1  
How many cores do you have? how would using more threads help here? Note your lock means that only 1 thread can be useful at a time here... –  Marc Gravell Jul 8 '11 at 7:19
    
@Am - threads are never "dedicated to a process" as such. Threads are per-process. –  Marc Gravell Jul 8 '11 at 7:20
    
Task FillTask = new Task(FillupTheQueue, Store); FillTask.Start(); FillTask.Wait(); == FillupTheQueue(Store) - except it's more complex to read, introduces unnecessary threads, requires the Store to be cast back into ConcurrentQueue<String>... –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 8 '11 at 7:22
    
@Am: You can set Min (and Max) number of threads but that is not advisable. –  Henk Holterman Jul 8 '11 at 7:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are using .NET's ThreadPool so .NET/Windows manages the number of threads based on the amount of work waiting to be processed.

share|improve this answer
    
Other than minor things like using int instead of Int32, I didn't see any major areas to cut back on. Sorry –  Jim Deville Jul 8 '11 at 7:17
    
Okay I'm glad you think so. Thanks :) –  Roman Jul 8 '11 at 7:19

While I monitor this code in Task Manager, I notice the process drops the number of threads from 18 (on my machine) to 14 but no less. Is this because my code isn't good?

This does not indicate a problem. 14 is still high, unless you've got a 16-core cpu.

The threadpool will try to adjust and do the work with as few threads as possible.

You should start to worry when the number of threads goes up significantly.

share|improve this answer
    
you made a good point –  Roman Jul 8 '11 at 7:26

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