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The orderedDictionary instantiation is this:

IOrderedDictionary orderedDictionary= gridview.DataKeys[index].Values;

orderedDictionary is read only.

How can I make a deep copy of orderedDictionary that is not read only? Serialization/deserialization doesn't work cause it also copies the read only part.

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Rather than reprise a deepness discussion I provide a link to an old question stackoverflow.com/q/78536/659190 –  Jodrell Jul 8 '11 at 9:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The easiest way would be to just copy the objects:

var newDictionary = new OrderedDictionary();
foreach(DictionaryEntry de in orderedDictionary)
{
    newDictionary.Add(de.Key, de.Value);
}

UPDATE:
This code will NOT create a deep copy of the values in the dictionary.
Example:

var orderedDictionary = new OrderedDictionary();
orderedDictionary.Add("1", new List<int> { 1, 2 });

var newDictionary = new OrderedDictionary();
foreach(DictionaryEntry de in orderedDictionary)
{
    newDictionary.Add(de.Key, de.Value);
}

Both dictionary will contain one entry with the key "1" and the same list. Removing an item from this list in any of the dictionaries will also change the contents of the list in the other dictionary, because there only IS one list.

Console.WriteLine(((List<int>)orderedDictionary["1"]).Count);
Console.WriteLine(((List<int>)newDictionary["1"]).Count);
Console.WriteLine(ReferenceEquals(orderedDictionary["1"], newDictionary["1"]));
((List<int>)orderedDictionary["1"]).Remove(1);
Console.WriteLine(((List<int>)orderedDictionary["1"]).Count);
Console.WriteLine(((List<int>)newDictionary["1"]).Count);

This will output the following:

2
2
True
1
1

Assigning a new value to a key in one of the dictionary however has no effect on the other dictionary:

newDictionary["1"] = new List<int>{3,4};
Console.WriteLine(ReferenceEquals(orderedDictionary["1"], newDictionary["1"]));
Console.WriteLine(((List<int>)orderedDictionary["1"]).Count);
Console.WriteLine(((List<int>)newDictionary["1"]).Count);

This will output:

False
2
3
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Just what I was thinking but, would this just copy the references from one dictionary to the other? Would that be "deep"? –  Jodrell Jul 8 '11 at 8:49
1  
@Jodrell: You are right, this isn't a deep copy. Although the OP asks about doing a deep copy, I don't think he really wants to do that. I read his question like so, that he just wants to create a new OrderedDictionary that is not read only. I may be wrong, though. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jul 8 '11 at 8:55
    
@Daniel Hilgarth: Your solution is good, and it does a deep copy of orderedDictionary, i tested it, modifying the newDictionary values doesn't affect the orderedDicionary values. Thanks! –  Răzvan Panda Jul 8 '11 at 9:02
1  
@Jodrell, @Daniel Higarth, seems there are several depths in the deeps. :-) –  Jodrell Jul 8 '11 at 9:19
    
@Răzvan: This isn't a real deep copy. Modifying the properties of an item in one of the dictionaries will result in a change of the properties of the same item in the other dictionary, because they really are the same. In other words: You have two different dictionaries, but the objects in those dictionaries are the same. –  Daniel Hilgarth Jul 8 '11 at 10:03

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