Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

It's not hard to understand String.class.getClass(), which mean return a Class Object that represent the run time class of String Object. But what's going on when calling Class.class.getClass(), can I apprehend it as returning a Class object that represent the run time class of Class object itself? How can this be implemented in Java reflection API?

share|improve this question
    
getClass() is implemented by every Object, its not part of the reflection API (or any other API) –  Peter Lawrey Jul 8 '11 at 9:10
    
Oh boy, you are in for a treat if you ever look at Smalltalk's reflection model. Highly recommended. –  Wouter Lievens Jul 8 '11 at 9:11
    
you get a constant actually (the code will be compiled to a constant) –  bestsss Jul 8 '11 at 9:15
    
to add to what Peter said, the class is (usually) part of the object header, or in some case it can be part of the reference (pointer) itself. –  bestsss Jul 8 '11 at 9:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

a Class object that represent the run time class of Class object itself?

Yes.

But String.class.getClass() is the same thing.

String.class already means "the object of type Class that represents the String class". Calling .getClass() on that means "the object of type Class that represents the Class class", because we're calling it on an object of type Class.

If you have an object that is a String, for example "hi mom", then you can reflect it with .getClass(): ("hi mom").getClass() for example. IIRC, this will return the exact same object as String.class in normal circumstances, because there is only one Class object per class (, per ClassLoader in use).

How can this be implemented in Java reflection API?

Every time the bytecode for a class is loaded, a Class object is created and associated with that bytecode. Every object conceptually keeps a "hidden" reference to the Class instance that represents its class, that is automatically set by the constructor. Class objects have this reference set to a Class object that represents the Class class. In particular, the Class object that represents the Class class has a reference to itself.

share|improve this answer
can I apprehend it as returning a Class object that represent the  run time class of Class object itself?

No. Object.class.getClass() is same as Class.class.getClass().

    System.out.println(Object.class.getClass() == Class.class.getClass()); // true
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.