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I have read a great deal of questions, answers, advise with regards to this issue.

I have used coding both in my HTML and CSS to try to eliminate any problems but IE8 AND IE9 still do not display the page correctly (with the rounded corners). It also doesnt display shadow text (but that is yet another issue.

My Header Code:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=9" />
    <!--< meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" />-->
    <link href="css/ts_style.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
    <script type="text/javascript" src="javascript/date.js">
    <script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript">

Note, the second Meta Tag is quoted out as on piece of advice was to use the newer one (the first one) also I have had to add spaces and line breaks to display ALL information and on seperate lines.

My CSS Code:

border-radius-topleft:0px; /* top left corner */
border-radius-topright:10px; /* top right corner */
border-radius-bottomleft:0px; /* bottom left corner */
border-radius-bottomright:10px; /* bottom right corner */
border-radius:0px 10px 10px 0px; /* shorthand topleft topright bottomright bottomleft */

/* firefox's individual border radius properties */
-moz-border-radius-topleft:0px; /* top left corner */
-moz-border-radius-topright:10px; /* top right corner */
-moz-border-radius-bottomleft:0px; /* bottom left corner */
-moz-border-radius-bottomright:10px; /* bottom right corner */
-moz-border-radius:0px 10px 10px 0px; /* shorthand topleft topright bottomright bottomleft */

behavior:url(border-radius.htc);

/* webkit's individual border radius properties */
-webkit-border-top-left-radius:0px; /* top left corner */
-webkit-border-top-right-radius:10px; /* top right corner */
-webkit-border-bottom-left-radius:0px; /* bottom left corner */
-webkit-border-bottom-right-radius:10px; /* bottom right corner */

All of this works well in Firefox 5, Opera 11.5, Chrome 12.0.742.112, Safari 5.0.5 (7533.21.1) I personally do not feel it is up to developers to try and "fix the problem" I feel it is up to Microsoft to make their browser more compatibly/compliant. but for the interum, can someone help me out? Is my code incorrect? (Spaces and linebreaks added)

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what exactly does your behavior:url(border-radius.htc); do? –  xec Jul 8 '11 at 10:05
1  
@xec, check out code.google.com/p/curved-corner -- it can be downloaded from there. It is an IE-specific script which uses vml roundrect elements to do rounded corners in older IE version. –  Steven Don Jul 8 '11 at 10:07
    
@steven thanks! - @Keith is this an intranet page by any chance? if so you could check out Balanivash's suggestion –  xec Jul 8 '11 at 10:33
    
@Steven, yes thats where I got that from yesterday. Unfortunately it actually did nothing, as did the (pie.htc) command. Everything I have tried has not worked. –  Keith Jul 8 '11 at 12:35
    
@Steven, I have it installed into Xampp, also just in a folder on another drive. I have also uploaded it to a free public domain site, and it simply does not round the corners as I require, in IE that is. as I said, It works in Firefox 4 & 5, Safari, Chrome, Opera (All the latest versions) –  Keith Jul 8 '11 at 13:11
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8 Answers 8

IE6-8 don't support CSS3. At all.

You need something like CSS3PIE for them to work.

It should, however, work in IE9.

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Yes it should work in IE9, but, it doesn't. Hence why I am asking for assistance. Microsoft needs to do more work I feel. –  Keith Jul 8 '11 at 10:07
    
I have also added CSS3PIE to my site files including the pie.htc file and changed the CSS behavior:url(border-radius.htc) to behavior:url(pie/pie.htc) as I added a folder called pie to the site and included all of the files from the zip to that folder. So I would have thought that it would work in IE9. I also made a slight change to the CSS, it now starts the radius rule like this: –  Keith Jul 8 '11 at 10:21
    
border-radius-topleft:0px; /* top left corner / border-radius-topright:10px; / top right corner / border-radius-bottomleft:0px; / bottom left corner / border-radius-bottomright:10px; / bottom right corner / border-radius:0px 10px 10px 0px; / shorthand topleft topright bottomright bottomleft */ behavior:url(pie/pie.htc); This doesnt work either.):< –  Keith Jul 8 '11 at 10:30
    
Did you read the information on the CSS3PIE website? Whilst it supports rounded corners on IE6-8, it DOESN'T support the format you're using, only the shorthand version. Whilst this is limiting, that's the way it is at the moment. –  Ian Devlin Jul 13 '11 at 8:24
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While your shorthand codes are correct, you're using the incorrect longhand values for proper CSS3. It should not be "border-radius-bottomright", but "border-bottom-right-radius". Mozilla has had an incorrect naming convention for this. The Webkit one is the correct version.

Also, be sure to place your vendor-specific versions before the standards versions.

You might like to use an online tool to generate them, such as http://border-radius.com/

Edit: Start by eliminating absolutely everything (and I do mean EVERYTHING) that is unrelated and add them back in one by one until you see where things go wrong:

<!doctype html>
<body>
    <div style="border: 1px solid black; border-radius: 10px; padding: 1em;">
        Rounded corners
    </div>
</body>

Next step would be something like:

<!doctype html>
<style type="text/css">
div#test { border: 1px solid black; border-radius: 10px; padding: 1em; }
</style>
<body>
    <div id="test">
        Rounded corners
    </div>
</body>

etc. It's definitely a bug in the code that you haven't posted.

Yet another edit: It's caused by the filter:progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.gradient(...);, which operates on the entire element, ignoring the rounded corners. Remove the filter declaration and either don't have a gradient background or use an image (SVG if you want to have proper gradients, PNG otherwise) and you'll see rounded corners.

Moral of the story: always eliminate everything else, in case you have a strange CSS issue like this. Start with the absolute minimum styles and add in the other ones until the issue manifests itself. Things can interact badly.

share|improve this answer
    
Changed the longhand code, still not working. I did use the suggested tool as well. –  Keith Jul 8 '11 at 10:46
    
New code reads as: border-top-right-radius: 10px;/* top right corner / border-top-left-radius:0px;/ top left corner / border-bottom-right-radius: 10px;/ bottom right corner / border-bottom-left-radius: 0px;/ bottom left corner / border-radius:0px 10px 10px 0px; / shorthand topleft topright bottomright bottomleft */ behavior:url(pie/pie.htc); –  Keith Jul 8 '11 at 10:50
    
Have you tried removing the behavior setting first? It's not standard CSS and may be interfering in the case of IE9. Make sure it's only there for IE8 and earlier. –  Steven Don Jul 8 '11 at 11:35
    
Yes its been removed, had no effect. –  Keith Jul 8 '11 at 11:46
    
Well, the error is not in the snippet of CSS you posted here. Therefore it is likely to be elsewhere. Try with a completely simplified document and start adding from there until the corners disappear. Since I can't post code in a comment, I'll add it to my original answer. –  Steven Don Jul 9 '11 at 14:54
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Internet Explorer did not support border-radius until IE9. In IE9 you can use rounder edges , the important steps is to use the edge META tag and provide the border radius:

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge" />
<style>
border-top-right-radius: 7px;
border-top-left-radius: 7px;
border-bottom-right-radius: 2px;
border-bottom-left-radius: 2px;
</style>

EDIT

According to MSDN, { border-radius : sRadius } should work properly. And they have told that the feature is there in IE9.

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2  
IE=edge only means latest version of IE, and has little to do with edges. However: this code might work if this is an intranet, seeing as IE8/9 will revert to IE7 rendering mode on intranet urls for some reason. (Microsoft likes to make web developers cry i guess) –  xec Jul 8 '11 at 10:27
    
+1 for "Microsoft likes to make web developers cry ". I have not experienced this problem till now, but from IE9,I think CSS3 radius works perfectly even without this meta tag. –  Balanivash Jul 8 '11 at 10:31
    
Umm, nope this didnt work either. I also added the style to the html page, and it still didnt work. –  Keith Jul 8 '11 at 10:36
    
Then think there might be someother problem, may be another div style overriding this. Check if this is the case. –  Balanivash Jul 8 '11 at 10:37
    
border-top-right-radius: 10px;/* top right corner / border-top-left-radius:0px;/ top left corner / border-bottom-right-radius: 10px;/ bottom right corner / border-bottom-left-radius: 0px;/ bottom left corner / border-radius:0px 10px 10px 0px; / shorthand topleft topright bottomright bottomleft */ behavior:url(pie/pie.htc); –  Keith Jul 8 '11 at 10:47
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Try changing your header to:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
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rounded corners does not work in ie9 without the meta tags. Its strange that until now microsoft still believe they can belong to their own world

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i used this:

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge" />

the behavior border-radius.htc and border-radius: 10px;

with shadows, works fine in IE9

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Try this:

border-radius: 5px 10px 5px 10px / 10px 5px 10px 5px;

The border---radius does not work...

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Just add a slash before border-radius.htc.

The url path in behavior: is relative to the page that is calling the css file. This should work.

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Really, relative to the page calling the css file? For other CSS properties it is always relative to the CSS file itself, so that'd be surprising (but not unexpected from Microsoft). –  Martijn Pieters Nov 7 '12 at 12:47
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