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Brief Description

In a previous post I asked around about a problem with dangling pointers. I understood that I'm advised to use Boost and I will rewrite my prog as soon I fully got the basics about classical pointers and memory management, as for example embedded devices carry a limited set of lib's and boost might not be available so I want to be able to do this the hard way.

Complete Explanation

By now my prog creates a lot of pointers to Rabbit objects in a vector. In a function pop_rabbits( Vector<Rabbit*>, int amount) I'll attempt to delete a few from memory and pop the pointers from the vector like this :

void pop_rabbits(vector<Rabbit*> & rabbits, int n){
    vector<Rabbit*>::iterator rabbits_iterator ;

    for(int r = 0 ; r < n ; r++ ){
        Rabbit* dead_rabbit ;
        dead_rabbit = rabbits.back() ;
        delete dead_rabbit ;
        rabbits.pop_back();
    }
}

But rabbits get popped and deleted but in when I look at the process memory usage, it doesn't decrease.

Valgrind output :

==26286== 
==26286== HEAP SUMMARY:
==26286==     in use at exit: 117,290 bytes in 6,471 blocks
==26286==   total heap usage: 11,503 allocs, 5,032 frees, 222,872 bytes allocated
==26286== 
==26286== LEAK SUMMARY:
==26286==    definitely lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==26286==    indirectly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==26286==      possibly lost: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==26286==    still reachable: 117,290 bytes in 6,471 blocks
==26286==         suppressed: 0 bytes in 0 blocks
==26286== Rerun with --leak-check=full to see details of leaked memory
==26286== 
==26286== For counts of detected and suppressed errors, rerun with: -v
==26286== ERROR SUMMARY: 0 errors from 0 contexts (suppressed: 18 from 7)

Is this system related behavior or did I forget somehing to actually force remapping of the memory assigned to the process ?

Source Code

/*
This will become an exercise on dynamic memory ;
Im going to create a lot of breeding rabbits :)
the application will wait for the user to give his fiat for mating, LOL 
*/

using namespace std ;

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <cstring>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>
#include <sys/time.h>
#include <sys/resource.h>

class Rabbit {
    public:
        enum sexes { MALE = 0x1, FEMALE = 0x2 } ;
        int sex ;
        bool has_mated ;
        Rabbit();
        ~Rabbit();
        void setSexe(int sex);
        void match( vector<Rabbit*> &rabbits ); //returns true if it found a female and makes the female breed.
        void breed( Rabbit &partner, vector<Rabbit*> &rabbits ); //create ofspring from the female mixing in the genes from the male
};

Rabbit::Rabbit(){
    this->sex = random() % 2 + 1 ; //random m/f
    this->has_mated = false ;
}

Rabbit::~Rabbit(){
    cout << "Aaaaahggg...beybeye cruel world !\n";
}

void Rabbit::setSexe( int sex ){
    this->sex = sex ;
}

void Rabbit::match(vector<Rabbit*> &rabbits){
    int s = rabbits.size() ;
    int r = 0 ;
    for(r ; r < s ; r++ ){
        Rabbit* partner_ptr = rabbits.at(r) ;

        if( partner_ptr->sex == Rabbit::MALE ){
            this->breed(*partner_ptr, rabbits);
        }
    }
}

void Rabbit::breed( Rabbit &partner, vector<Rabbit*> &rabbits ){
    int offspring, sex ; 
    offspring = random() % 4 + 3 ;
    cout << "breeding " << offspring << " rabbits..."  << endl ;
    Rabbit* temp_rabbit ;
    for(int i=0; i < offspring; i++){
        int sex = random() % 2 + 1 ;
        temp_rabbit = new Rabbit() ;
        temp_rabbit->setSexe(sex);
        rabbits.push_back(temp_rabbit);
        cout << "one rabbit has been born." << endl ;
    }
    this->has_mated = true ;
}

//makes rabbits date each other
void match_rabbits(vector<Rabbit*> & rabbits){

    cout << "matching rabbits..." << endl ;

    for(int r = 0; r < rabbits.size() ; r++ ){

        Rabbit* nth_rabbit_p = rabbits.at(r);

        if( nth_rabbit_p->sex == Rabbit::FEMALE && nth_rabbit_p->has_mated == false){
            cout << "found a female" << endl ;
            nth_rabbit_p->match(rabbits) ;
            break ;
        }

    }
}

void pop_rabbits(vector<Rabbit*> & rabbits, int n){
    vector<Rabbit*>::iterator rabbits_iterator ;

    for(int r = 0 ; r < n ; r++ ){
        Rabbit* dead_rabbit ;
        dead_rabbit = rabbits.back() ;
        delete dead_rabbit ;
        rabbits.pop_back();
    }
}

int main( int argc , const char* argv[] ){


    srand(time(NULL));

    vector<Rabbit*> rabbits = vector<Rabbit*>(0) ;

    Rabbit* adam ;
    adam = new Rabbit();
    adam->setSexe(Rabbit::MALE) ;

    Rabbit* eve ;
    eve = new Rabbit() ;
    eve->setSexe(Rabbit::FEMALE) ;

    char * input;
    input = new char[2] ;

    try{

        //populate with 2 rabbits.

        rabbits.push_back(adam);
        rabbits.push_back(eve);

        do {


            //memory_usage = getrusage(RUSAGE_SELF, struct rusage *usage);
            if(rabbits.size() < 2){ 
                break ;
            }

            cout << rabbits.size() << " rabbits ( " << ( rabbits.size() * sizeof(Rabbit) )/1024 << "K )" << endl ;

            cout << "Shoot some rabbits ? (Y/N) :" << endl ;

            delete[] input ;
            input = new char[2] ;
            cin.getline(input,2);       

            if( strcmp(input,"Y") == 0 || strcmp(input,"y") == 0){
                cout << "How many ? :" << endl ;

                delete[] input ;
                input = new char[16] ;
                cin.getline(input,16);

                pop_rabbits(rabbits, atoi(input));

                continue ;
            } 

            cout << "Continue ? (Y/Q) :" << endl ;

            delete[] input ;
            input = new char[2] ;
            cin.getline(input,2);   

            if(strcmp(input,"Y") == 0 || strcmp(input,"y") == 0){
                match_rabbits(rabbits);//let the rabbits date
            }

            if(strcmp(input,"Q") == 0 || strcmp(input,"q") == 0){
                break ;
            }

        } while( true );

        exit(0);

    } catch ( exception& e ){
        cout << e.what() << endl ; //print error
        exit(1);
    }

}
share|improve this question
3  
You want to learn it the hard way; you want to ask it the short way :) –  sehe Jul 8 '11 at 10:13
2  
Don't store pointers in your vector. The way to do memory management in C++ is to offload it to others. Store your objects themselves, not pointers to them, in the standard containers. And any object which requires dynamically allocted memory should perform the allocation itself, and free it itself (typically in the destructor). Using Boost is good advice, because it shows you what "the right way" looks like. Even if you find yourself on a platform where Boost isn't available, you'll be better off knowing how Boost solved the problem, than relying on your own ad-hoc experiments with mem mgmt –  jalf Jul 8 '11 at 10:15
    
Hmm, can agree with that, but i'm taking it step by step, as it seem logic to me that if I want to understand boost, i'll have to feel at ease with the basics. I'm comming from Java so memory management is new for me. And I would like to get a feel for what's happening in memrory when running a C++ prog. –  DaNooby Jul 8 '11 at 10:23
    
Next step, recoding to using boost, and get the memory usage from proc. I'll post it somewhere here. ^-^ –  DaNooby Jul 8 '11 at 10:35
    
@DaNooby - Memory management isn't hard in C++ either - you just don't do it yourself! You are trying to learn the hard way, when there already is an easy way. Most C++ programs don't have a single new or delete, because they are not needed. –  Bo Persson Jul 8 '11 at 11:53
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is this system related behavour or did i forgot somehing to actually force remapping of the memory assigned to the process ?

What you've done is right. What valgrind is reporting is right. It's up to the operating system to decide when that memory can be allocated to another process. You aren't always going to notice a decrease in the memory usage count after deleting pointers to memory you own.

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FWIW that valgrind report looks clean (reachables frequently stem from the standard library, e.g. std::cout;

You can of course find out (run with --leak-check=full -v) but be prepared to wade through pages of false positives and /not-your-code/ references

share|improve this answer
    
Ah thats intresting to know, so it are actually the strings sent to cout that take the memory. Thx I did some experimenting with --leak-check=full and indeed...a lot to read :D –  DaNooby Jul 8 '11 at 10:26
    
DaNooby: not necesarrily the strings, but more likely the classes and buffers internally associated with std::cout, std::cin and std::cerr objects (possibly containing copies of said strings); think of locale conversion tables, stuff like that –  sehe Jul 8 '11 at 10:28
    
Even more interesting, gives me an eye on whats going on, as i'm much closer tot the system now than in Java, that's the reason why I'm moving to C++. –  DaNooby Jul 8 '11 at 10:32
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