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I am building a system which asks questions and receives answers to them. Each question can have an aswer of its own type. Let's limit it to String and DateTime for now. In Domain, question is represented the following way:

public class Question
{
    public int Id
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public string Caption
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public AnswerType
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

, where AnswerType is

enum AnswerType
{
    String,
    DateTime
}

Please note that actually I have much more answer types.

I came up with an idea of creating a MVC model, deriving from Question and adding Answer property to it. So it has to be something like this:

public class QuestionWithAnswer<TAnswer> : Question
{
    public TAnswer Answer
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

And here start the problems. I want to have a generic view to draw any question, so it needs to be something like that:

@model QuestionWithAnswer<dynamic>

<span>@Model.Caption</span>
@Html.EditorFor(m => m.Answer)

For String I want to have simple input here, for DateTime I am going to define my own view. I can pass the concrete model from the controller. But the problem is that on the rendering stage, naturally, it cannot determine the type of Answer, especially if it is initially null (default for String), so EditorFor draws nothing for String and inputs for all properties in DateTime.

I do understand the nature of the problem, but is there any elegant workaround? Or I have to implement my own logic for selecting editor view name basing on control type (big ugly switch)?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can still use the Html.EditorFor(..), but specify a second parameter which is the name of the editor template. You have a property on the Question object that is the AnswerType, so you could do something like...

@Html.EditorFor(m => m.Answer, @Model.AnswerType)

The in your EditorTemplates folder just define a view for each of the AnswerTypes. ie "String", "DateTime", etc.

EDIT: As far as the Answer object being null for String, i would put a placeholder object there just so the model in you "String" editor template is not null.

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Ha! How on earth could I overlook this overload?! That looks close to perfect, thanks! Accepting the answer :) –  Michael Sagalovich Jul 8 '11 at 11:32
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Personally I don't like this:

enum AnswerType
{
    String,
    DateTime
}

I prefer using .NET type system. Let me suggest you an alternative design. As always we start by defining out view models:

public abstract class AnswerViewModel
{
    public string Type 
    {
        get { return GetType().FullName; }
    }
}

public class StringAnswer : AnswerViewModel
{
    [Required]
    public string Value { get; set; }
}

public class DateAnswer : AnswerViewModel
{
    [Required]
    public DateTime? Value { get; set; }
}

public class QuestionViewModel
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Caption { get; set; }
    public AnswerViewModel Answer { get; set; }
}

then a controller:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Index()
    {
        var model = new[]
        {
            new QuestionViewModel
            {
                Id = 1,
                Caption = "What is your favorite color?",
                Answer = new StringAnswer()
            },
            new QuestionViewModel
            {
                Id = 1,
                Caption = "What is your birth date?",
                Answer = new DateAnswer()
            },
        };
        return View(model);
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult Index(IEnumerable<QuestionViewModel> questions)
    {
        // process the answers. Thanks to our custom model binder
        // (see below) here you will get the model properly populated
        ...
    }
}

then the main Index.cshtml view:

@model QuestionViewModel[]

@using (Html.BeginForm())
{
    <ul>
        @for (int i = 0; i < Model.Length; i++)
        {
            @Html.HiddenFor(x => x[i].Answer.Type)
            @Html.HiddenFor(x => x[i].Id)
            <li>
                @Html.DisplayFor(x => x[i].Caption)
                @Html.EditorFor(x => x[i].Answer)
            </li>
        }
    </ul>
    <input type="submit" value="OK" />
}

and now we can have editor templates for our answers:

~/Views/Home/EditorTemplates/StringAnswer.cshtml:

@model StringAnswer

<div>It's a string answer</div>
@Html.EditorFor(x => x.Value)
@Html.ValidationMessageFor(x => x.Value)

~/Views/Home/EditorTemplates/DateAnswer.cshtml:

@model DateAnswer

<div>It's a date answer</div>
@Html.EditorFor(x => x.Value)
@Html.ValidationMessageFor(x => x.Value)

and the last piece is a custom model binder for our answers:

public class AnswerModelBinder : DefaultModelBinder
{
    protected override object CreateModel(ControllerContext controllerContext, ModelBindingContext bindingContext, Type modelType)
    {
        var typeValue = bindingContext.ValueProvider.GetValue(bindingContext.ModelName + ".Type");
        var type = Type.GetType(typeValue.AttemptedValue, true);
        var model = Activator.CreateInstance(type);
        bindingContext.ModelMetadata = ModelMetadataProviders.Current.GetMetadataForType(() => model, type);
        return model;
    }
}

which will be registered in Application_Start:

ModelBinders.Binders.Add(typeof(AnswerViewModel), new AnswerModelBinder());
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enum AnswerType { String, DateTime } is what I have to use, this comes from database. But I can map it to you structure, of course. Yet the first answer by @tkerwood seems to serve my needs. I'll evalute it and if I find some drawback there, you'll return to yours. Thanks! –  Michael Sagalovich Jul 8 '11 at 11:42
    
@Michael Sagalovich, what I have shown is the usage of view models. This is what you should always use. What you have in your database and your domain entities are not so much important. What you need to understand is that you should always work with view models and have your controller actions pass and receive view models. The mapping between your domain models and the view models could be done in the controller if you wanted to reuse some existing domain classes. But don't pass those classes to your views. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 8 '11 at 11:43
    
Thanks, great guru :) Frankly, I have lots of arguments for and against what you're saying, and for and against using domain models on views, but that's not a question here. –  Michael Sagalovich Jul 8 '11 at 11:49
    
@DarinDimitrov I am using your example code and it is quite helpful. However, when I try to process the answers with public ActionResult Index(IEnumerable<QuestionViewModel> questions), the QuestionViewModel in questions do not contain the caption anymore. Any idea why ? –  Andreas Schwarz Feb 19 '13 at 9:19
    
@AndreasSchwarz, in my example I have only displayed the caption in the view: @Html.DisplayFor(x => x[i].Caption). If you want to persist the value you could store it in a hidden field. But personally I wouldn't bother with that because you already have the ID which should be enough to retrieve the caption on your server from wherever datastore you are using. –  Darin Dimitrov Feb 19 '13 at 9:22
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