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I am trying to install a program (a Java application) on my Linux machine (I am using Slackware). I have received the following error, and I do not understand it. Could you advise me how to approach the problem? I am not sure whether this is a kind of question I could ask here, because it is not exactly a programming question, but I would appreciate if you reply. Thank you.

Here is what I get: (I see that some X11 DISPLAY variable needs to be set, but what value should I give it and how?)

~$ java -jar gate-5.0-beta1-build3048-installer.jar
- ERROR -

java.awt.HeadlessException:
No X11 DISPLAY variable was set, but this program performed an operation which requires it.
java.awt.HeadlessException:
No X11 DISPLAY variable was set, but this program performed an operation which requires it.
at java.awt.GraphicsEnvironment.checkHeadless(Graphic sEnvironment.java:159)
at java.awt.Window.<init>(Window.java:407)
at java.awt.Frame.<init>(Frame.java:402)
at net.sourceforge.mlf.metouia.borders.MetouiaDotsBuf fer.<init>(MetouiaDotsBuffer.java:105)
at net.sourceforge.mlf.metouia.borders.MetouiaDots.<i nit>(MetouiaDots.java:66)
at net.sourceforge.mlf.metouia.borders.MetouiaToolBar Border.<init>(MetouiaToolBarBorder.java:49)
at net.sourceforge.mlf.metouia.MetouiaLookAndFeel.ini tComponentDefaults(MetouiaLookAndFeel.java:241)
at javax.swing.plaf.basic.BasicLookAndFeel.getDefault s(BasicLookAndFeel.java:130)
at javax.swing.plaf.metal.MetalLookAndFeel.getDefault s(MetalLookAndFeel.java:1591)
at javax.swing.UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.jav a:537)
at javax.swing.UIManager.setLookAndFeel(UIManager.jav a:581)
at com.izforge.izpack.installer.GUIInstaller.loadLook AndFeel(GUIInstaller.java:373)
at com.izforge.izpack.installer.GUIInstaller.<init>(G UIInstaller.java:116)
at sun.reflect.NativeConstructorAccessorImpl.newInsta nce0(Native Method)
at sun.reflect.NativeConstructorAccessorImpl.newInsta nce(NativeConstructorAccessorImpl.java:39)
at sun.reflect.DelegatingConstructorAccessorImpl.newI nstance(DelegatingConstructorAccessorImpl.java:27)
at java.lang.reflect.Constructor.newInstance(Construc tor.java:513)
at java.lang.Class.newInstance0(Class.java:355)
at java.lang.Class.newInstance(Class.java:30
at com.izforge.izpack.installer.Installer.main(Instal ler.java:62)
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i'm having the same problem, it works perfecly on console but when i use eclipse it throws the same exception i even put that code lines : Process proc_exporting =Runtime.getRuntime().exec("sudo export DISPLAY =:0.0"); still doesn't work –  hb.Sara Dec 27 '11 at 15:14
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3 Answers

up vote 43 down vote accepted

If you're on the main display, then

export DISPLAY=:0.0

or if you're using csh or tcsh

setenv DISPLAY :0.0

before running your app.

Actually, I'm surprised it isn't set automatically. Are you trying to start this application from a non-graphic terminal? If not, have you modified the default .profile, .login, .bashrc or .cshrc?

Note that setting the DISPLAY to :0.0 pre-supposes that you're sitting at the main display, as I said, or at least that the main display is logged on to your user id. If it's not logged on, or it's a different userid, this will fail.

If you're coming in from another machine, and you're at the main display of that machine and it's running X, then you can use "ssh -X hostname" to connect to that host, and ssh will forward the X display back. ssh will also make sure that the DISPLAY environment variable is set correctly (providing it isn't being messed with in the various dot files I mentioned above). In a "ssh -X" session, the DISPLAY environment variable will have a value like "localhost:11.0", which will point to the socket that ssh is tunnelling to your local box.

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Hi, thank you very much, the first one worked for me. Yes, I am starting it from a non-graphic terminal. –  user42155 Mar 19 '09 at 14:35
    
It sounds like it wants to accesss the graphics display though. Be careful not to run it when the graphics display isn't available, or it belongs to some other userid. –  Paul Tomblin Mar 19 '09 at 14:36
1  
note that this worked because you are/were on the console. if you were on another terminal, you would have to have an X server running on the terminal and then set the environment to point to your machine (export DISPLAY='hostname of pauls terminal':0.0 for example) –  KevinDTimm Mar 19 '09 at 15:14
    
@kevindtimm, Good point - I'm going to incorporate @Mikeage's info about ssh -X into my answer. –  Paul Tomblin Mar 19 '09 at 15:17
1  
In case you need to run an automated task that requires connecting to an X server you can look at xvfb, which creates a virtual X server. This is very useful for some batch tests or running tests. –  Wichert Akkerman Dec 27 '11 at 15:27
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Are you running this from within an X11 environment? You can use a terminal window, but it has to be within X (either after a graphical login, or by running startx).

If you're already within a graphical environment, try export DISPLAY=:0 for bash like shells (bash, sh, etc) or setenv DISPLAY :0 for C shell based shells (csh, tcsh, etc)

If you've connected from another machine via SSH, you use the -X option to display the graphical interface on the machine you're sitting at (provided there's an X server running there (such as xming for windows, and your standard Linux X server).

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Hi, I am running startx. –  user42155 Mar 19 '09 at 14:39
    
Oh right, Slackware. Is it still as barebones as it was when I last used it 10 years ago? –  Paul Tomblin Mar 19 '09 at 15:23
    
It still starts up by default in runlevel 3. Of course, if you tell it to start in runlevel 5, you'll get a pretty KDM login menu assuming you installed KDE. –  Adam Jaskiewicz Mar 24 '09 at 18:22
    
thanks! on CentOS and SSH (putty) used: export DISPLAY=:0 –  jacktrades Aug 21 '12 at 15:17
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Don't forget to execute "host +" on your "home" display machine, and when you ssh to the machine you're doing "ssh -x hostname"

-Tee

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9  
I would strongly recommend not to use "xhost +" since if effectively disables all security on your X server. ssh is smart enough to use xauth to setup X11 authentication automatically, so there should be no need to use xhost. –  Wichert Akkerman Dec 27 '11 at 15:26
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