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For Sample ....

SampleClass :

public class SampleClass
{
    public delegate void BeforeEditorHandle();
    public event BeforeEditorHandle OnBeforeEditor;
}

MainMethod

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        SampleClass sc = new SampleClass();
        // Add Event
        sc.OnBeforeEditor +=new SampleClass.BeforeEditorHandle(sc_OnBeforeEditor);
        // Remove Event
        sc.OnBeforeEditor -= new SampleClass.BeforeEditorHandle(sc_OnBeforeEditor);

    }

And , if I add the event by dynamic like this ...↓

sc.OnBeforeEditor += () => {  };

Should I remove the event like ↓

sc.OnBeforeEditor -= () => {  }; 

But I think this is very ugly when I have too much sources in the event.... Can anybody tell me the best way to remove the event please ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I'm pretty sure your code here won't work:

And , if I add the event by dynamic like this ...↓

sc.OnBeforeEditor += () => {  };

Should I remove the event like ↓

sc.OnBeforeEditor -= () => {  };

This is because restating the lambda creates a new different lambda.

You need to store the old reference and use it to unsubscribe:

BeforeEditorHandle myHandler=() => {  }
sc.OnBeforeEditor += myHandler;

...
sc.OnBeforeEditor -= myHandler;

For easier unsubscribing you can collect your event handlers in a collection (For example List<BeforeEditorHandle>).

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Thank you ....you are right that's wrong in my sample.... :) –  shenhengbin Jul 8 '11 at 13:25
    
@Oded what did you change? I think we had an editing conflict. –  CodesInChaos Jul 8 '11 at 13:25
    
Just added 4 spaces in front of your ... :) –  Oded Jul 8 '11 at 13:26

You can assign the event handler/lambda to a variable which you can then subscribe and unsubscribe:

var myHandler = () => {  };

sc.OnBeforeEditor += myHandler;

sc.OnBeforeEditor -= myHandler;
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Thanks, it's easy to know... –  shenhengbin Jul 8 '11 at 13:24
    
You need to type myHandler explicitly. (Cannot assign lambda expression to an implicitly-typed local variable) –  CodesInChaos Jul 8 '11 at 15:35

From MSDN:

It is important to notice that you cannot easily unsubscribe from an event if you used an anonymous function to subscribe to it. To unsubscribe in this scenario, it is necessary to go back to the code where you subscribe to the event, store the anonymous method in a delegate variable, and then add the delegate to the event. In general, we recommend that you do not use anonymous functions to subscribe to events if you will have to unsubscribe from the event at some later point in your code. For more information about anonymous functions, see Anonymous Functions (C# Programming Guide).

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