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Please consider the following snippet:

public interface MyInterface {

    public int getId();
}

public class MyPojo implements MyInterface {

    private int id;

    public MyPojo(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public int getId() {
        return id;
    }

}

public ArrayList<MyInterface> getMyInterfaces() {

    ArrayList<MyPojo> myPojos = new ArrayList<MyPojo>(0);
    myPojos.add(new MyPojo(0));
    myPojos.add(new MyPojo(1));

    return (ArrayList<MyInterface>) myPojos;
}

The return statement does a casting that doesn't compile. How can I convert the myPojos list to the more generic list, without having to go through each item of the list?

Thanks

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5 Answers 5

up vote 35 down vote accepted

Change your method to use a wildcard:

public ArrayList<? extends MyInterface> getMyInterfaces() {    
    ArrayList<MyPojo> myPojos = new ArrayList<MyPojo>(0);
    myPojos.add(new MyPojo(0));
    myPojos.add(new MyPojo(1));

    return myPojos;
}

This will prevent the caller from trying to add other implementations of the interface to the list. Alternatively, you could just write:

public ArrayList<MyInterface> getMyInterfaces() {
    // Note the change here
    ArrayList<MyInterface> myPojos = new ArrayList<MyInterface>(0);
    myPojos.add(new MyPojo(0));
    myPojos.add(new MyPojo(1));

    return myPojos;
}

As discussed in the comments:

  • Returning wildcarded collections can be awkward for callers
  • It's usually better to use interfaces instead of concrete types for return types. So the suggested signature would probably be one of:

    public List<MyInterface> getMyInterfaces()
    public Collection<MyInterface> getMyInterfaces()
    public Iterable<MyInterface> getMyInterfaces()
    
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The 2nd solution is better one IMHO. Returning wild cards is generally considered bad practice, b/c it constrains the client code. In this case with ArrayList<? extends MyInterface> you could only read from the list, and could not add anything to it. –  Julien Chastang Mar 19 '09 at 16:08
    
That may be what's wanted, of course - we just don't know. (It should almost certainly use List<T> instead of ArrayList<T> as well, or possibly just Iterable<T> or Collection<T>.) –  Jon Skeet Mar 19 '09 at 16:15
1  
+1 for using more generic types (e.g. List<T>, Collection<T>). But returning wildcards is rarely what you want. If you are leaning towards immutability there are better ways of doing it. Naftalin & Wadler talk about this in "Java Generics and Collections". –  Julien Chastang Mar 19 '09 at 16:21
    
Will edit the answer to reflect this. –  Jon Skeet Mar 19 '09 at 16:22
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Choosing the right type from the start is best, however to answer your question you can use type erasure.

return (ArrayList<MyInterface>) (ArrayList) myPojos;

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2  
IMO, this should be the answer, since in some cases, you simply can't add the items to a collection of the base type : think of JPA result set from queries, you got a list of JPA entities and if you like to return this list to the caller using some abstracting interface above the entity (persistence agnostic), Peter's advice is the way –  Shmil The Cat Jun 24 '13 at 20:44
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You should be doing:

public ArrayList<MyInterface> getMyInterfaces() {   
   ArrayList<MyInterface> myPojos = new ArrayList<MyInterface>(0);    
   myPojos.add(new MyPojo(0));    
   myPojos.add(new MyPojo(1));    
   return myPojos;
}
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In this case, I would do it like this:

public ArrayList<MyInterface> getMyInterfaces() {

    ArrayList<MyInterface> myPojos = new ArrayList<MyInterface>(0);
    myPojos.add(new MyPojo(0));
    myPojos.add(new MyPojo(1));

    return myPojos;
}

MyPojo ist of type MyInterface (as it implements the interface). This means, you can just create the List with the Interface you need.

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Try to use interfaces everywhere except when constructing instances, and you problems will go away:

public List<MyInterface> getMyInterfaces()
{
    List<MyInterface> myInterfaces = new ArrayList<MyInterface>(0);
    myInterfaces.add(new MyPojo(0));
    myInterfaces.add(new MyPojo(1));

    return myInterfaces;
}

As others have said already, the use of MyInterface fixes your problem. It is also better to use the List interface instead of ArrayList for return types and variables.

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The use of List isn't what fixes it there though - it's the use of MyInterface instead of MyPojo as the type argument. –  Jon Skeet Mar 19 '09 at 16:15
    
Yes, that was misleading, fixed it now. –  starblue Mar 19 '09 at 17:00
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