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I try to get this code running. I am almost there but I got stuck with the line:

 _f = std::bind1st(
         std::mem_fun(f, x);

First of all please understand that I don't want to change any code, but the constructor. Why? Because I want to learn. Eventually I want to write a wrapper class Func, that can handle free functions and member function at the same time, in this very manner.

So what wuld I have to put as the first argument inside the std::mem_func()-call??? I tried numerous things.

Probably this is a duplicate, but I don't know how to search for this problem. I lack the vocabulary. If someone can point to a tutorial or something, that would help me to express this problem, I would also appreciate it.

Here is the full sample code:

#include <boost/function.hpp>
#include <iostream>

struct X
{
    int foo(int i)
    {
        return i;
    };
};

class Func
{

public:

   Func(X *x,  int (X::* f) (int))
   {
      _f = std::bind1st(
         std::mem_fun(f, x);

      std::cout << _f(5); // Call x.foo(5)
   };

private:

    boost::function<int (int)> _f;
};

int main()
{

    X x;

    Func func(&x, &X::foo);
    return 0;
}

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
if you are learning - have a look at boost::bind - things will click... –  Nim Jul 8 '11 at 13:59
    
This example comes from the boost function documentation. There they don't make use of boost:bind in this context. If you could change the line I had trouble with into a (simple) boost::bind()-call, I'd be happy to know about it. –  AudioDroid Jul 8 '11 at 14:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It seems you just forgot a paren:

_f = std::bind1st(std::mem_fun(f), x);

Although I would initialize with

Func(X *x,  int (X::* f) (int))
  : _f(std::bind1st(std::mem_fun(f), x))
{
    std::cout << _f(5); // Call x.foo(5)
};

(It doesn't matter in this case, but this style is safer in the long run.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that's it. How could I not get that right...maybe I should take a break. ;-) I can only mark your answer as correct in 3 minutes. Be sure I will. –  AudioDroid Jul 8 '11 at 14:09
    
@AudioDroid: I can't blame you. GCC's first error is no matching function for call to ‘mem_fun(int (X::*&)(int), X*&)’ rather than a plain syntax error for a missing paren. –  larsmans Jul 8 '11 at 14:11
    
I just extended this example to a function (e.g. sum()) with two int's as arguments, and in short...it is all not working any more. :-( I will try a little longer then maybe open another question. –  AudioDroid Jul 8 '11 at 14:39

I would refactor the class slightly to use boost::function in the interface, and then the user can decide how to bind in the most generic way:

struct X {
    int foo(int i) { return i; };
};
class Func {
    boost::function<int (int)> _f;
public:
   Func( boost::function<int (int)> f ){
      _f = f;
      std::cout << _f(5);
   };
};
int foo( int x ) { return 2*x; }
int bar( int x, int multiplier ) { return x*multiplier; }
int main() {
    X x;
    Func func1( boost::bind( &X::foo, &x, _1 ) ); // this does the magic
    Func func2( boost::bind( &foo, _1 ) );        // you can also bind free functions...
    Func func3( boost::bind( &bar, _1, 5 ) );     // or with different arguments
}
share|improve this answer
    
That is also a nice idea, however I would like to keep all the "boost stuff" hidden. Thanks for seeing into this though. –  AudioDroid Jul 8 '11 at 14:37

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