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I'm making a program that has little programs inside of it, and I've come to a dilemma. On my first mini-program which rearranges digits to find the greatest possible number from those digits, it asks if the user wants to quit. If they respond "Yes" then the function returns 0 which is evaluated in the main(string[] args) method. My problem is that whenever the user says "No", the mini-program still doesn't continue. Here's my source:

    namespace ACSL_Competition
    {
        class Program
        {
    static int DigitRearranger()
    {
        string[] mainString = {};
        Console.WriteLine("---------Welcome to the Digit Re-arranger!---------");
        Console.WriteLine("I take a positive number up to 10000, and find the highest number that can be made out of its digits.");
        Console.WriteLine("Instructions: Enter a number up to 10000, and see the results!");
        drLabel:
        Console.Write("Your Number: ");

        string input = Console.ReadLine();
        int inputNumber = 0;
        try { inputNumber = int.Parse(input); }
        catch (Exception ex) { Console.WriteLine("Error: {0}", ex.Message); goto drLabel; }

        /*Placeholder code for the moment*/Console.WriteLine(inputNumber.ToString());
        evaluate:
        Console.Write("Do you want to exit? Yes/No: ");
        if (Console.ReadLine().Equals("Yes"))
            return 1;
        else if (Console.ReadLine().Equals("No"))
        {
            goto drLabel;

        }
        else
        {
            return 1;
        }

    }
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Welcome to the ACSL Competition Program. Choose a program to begin:");
        Console.Write("\n\t");
        Console.WriteLine("1\tDigit Re-arranger");
        label:
        Console.Write("\nProgram: ");
        string input = Console.ReadLine();
        int number = 0;
        try { number = int.Parse(input); }
        catch (Exception ex) { Console.WriteLine("Error: {0}", ex.Message); goto label; }
        if (number == 1)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("\n");
            if (DigitRearranger() == 1)
            {
                goto label;
            }
            else if (DigitRearranger() != 1)
            {
                DigitRearranger();
            }
        }
        else if (!number.Equals(1))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Not a valid program.");
            goto label;
        }
        //----------------
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

}

share|improve this question
    
don't use goto, refactor code so that it is not necessary. cs.utexas.edu/users/EWD/ewd02xx/EWD215.PDF. Ideally the only way you should "escape" your function is at the solitary and final return statement. –  Jodrell Jul 8 '11 at 14:53
    
Does your competition entry have to be limited to the console window? –  Jodrell Jul 8 '11 at 15:04
    
I'm not actually entering the competition, I'm just doing practice problems, but I'm keeping it in the console so I can focus less on the UI and more on the logic. –  airplaneman19 Jul 8 '11 at 15:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The underlying problem is that you're calling readline twice. The first time it gets the entered value, i.e. Yes, the second time you call it there is no data to read so it returns "". If you need to reuse the same input store it in a variable, i.e.

 string inputVal = Console.ReadLine();

I hate goto statements, maybe you could restructure your code in to a while loop, something like:

bool exit = false;
while(!exit)
{
    Console.Write("Your Number: ");
    //Your main code
    Console.Write("Do you want to exit? Yes/No: ");
    if(Console.ReadLine() != "No")
      exit = true;
}

In fact, you could get rid of the exit variable, just do while(true) and return if the user enters anything other than no.

share|improve this answer

I have a few suggestions:

  1. Write your code to be more modular to improve readability. The Main() method should only drive the outer UI loop, each module provides its own UI.
  2. Never use goto statements.
  3. Don't use Console.Readline() inside an if condition (when not "Yes", it was called twice).

Here is my refactored version of your code:

    class Program {
    static void DigitRearranger()
    {
        string response = "";
        int num;
        do
        {
            Console.Clear();
            Console.ForegroundColor = ConsoleColor.Yellow;
            Console.WriteLine("---------Welcome to the Digit Re-arranger!---------");
            Console.WriteLine("I take a positive number up to 10000, and find the highest number that can be made out of its digits.");
            Console.WriteLine("Instructions: Enter a number up to 10000, and see the results!");
            Console.ResetColor();

            Console.Write("Your Number: ");
            if (!int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(), out num))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Not a number.  Press any key to continue");
                Console.ReadKey();
                continue;
            }
            //todo:  reaarrange the number & print results
            /*Placeholder code for the moment*/
            Console.WriteLine(num);

            Console.Write("Do you want to exit? Yes/No: ");
            response = Console.ReadLine();

        } while (response.ToLower() != "yes");
    }

    //UI driver only in Main method:
    static void Main(){
        string response = "";

        do
        {
            Console.Clear();
            Console.WriteLine("Welcome to the ACSL Competition Program. Choose a program to begin:");
            Console.WriteLine("\n\t1\tDigit Re-arranger");
            Console.WriteLine("\tq\tQuit");

            Console.Write("\nProgram: ");

            response = Console.ReadLine();
            switch(response)
            {
                case "1":
                    DigitRearranger();
                    break;
                case "q":
                    break;
                default:
                    Console.WriteLine("Not a valid program.  Press any key to continue");
                    Console.ReadKey();
                    break;
            }
        } while (response.ToLower() != "q");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }}
share|improve this answer

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