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I have a question regarding the Java Memory Model. Here is a simple class presenting the problem:

public class ImmutableIntArray {

    private final int[] array;

    public ImmutableIntArray() {
        array = new int[10];
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            array[i] = i;
        }
    }

    // Will always return the correct value?
    public int get(int index) {
        return array[index];
    }

}

As far as I know the JMM guarantees that the value of final fields will be visible to other threads after construction. But I want to ensure that other threads will see the most recent version of data stored in the array after construction.

Of course the code above is just a simple example presenting the problem, actually I want to implement a simple cache for direct byte buffers and I wouldn't like to rely on some Collection classes. Currently I am using a ReentrantReadWriteLock to ensure the correct behaviour but I would like avoid it if it is possible.

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1  
array is decleared as final, you cannot modify it –  Eng.Fouad Jul 8 '11 at 14:43
1  
You could also implement it as singleton(with array filling in private constructor), so there is a guarantee, that array will be filled and only after accessible from other classes. –  Serhiy Jul 8 '11 at 14:45
    
Sorry, don't understand question... what post-construction modification is going on? Can you provide a scenario you'd be worried about? –  Ed Staub Jul 8 '11 at 14:46
9  
@Eng.Fouad you cannot reassign the array field to another instance, but you can change the actual values in the array such as array[9] = 25. –  01es Jul 8 '11 at 14:47
1  
Changing the array isn't even relevant here. He just wants to know if the construction assignments will be visible post-construction (and as Andrzej says: "Yes") –  dlev Jul 8 '11 at 14:49
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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

In this example, everything will be fine (hmm, let's suspend judgement a bit). Immutability is ambrosia when it comes to thread-safety - if a value cannot change, the majority of concurrency problems are immediately no longer a concern.

Amir mentioned volatile which is generally useful - but the constructor also has similar semantics for final variables that ensure visibility. See JLS clause 17.5 for details - essentially the constructor forms a happens-before relationship between the write to the final variables and any subsequent reads.

EDIT: So you set the values reference to the array in the constructor, it's visible across all threads at that point, and then it doesn't change. So we know all other threads will see the same array. But what about the array's contents?

As it stands, array elements don't have any special semantics with regard to volatility, they're as if you just declared a class yourself something like:

public class ArrayTen {
    private int _0;
    private int _1;
    // ...
    private int _9;

    public int get(int index) {
       if (index == 0) return _0;
       // etc.
    }
}

So - another thread will only see these variables if we can do something to establish the happens-before relationship. And if my understanding is correct this requires but a small change to your original code.

We already know that the setting of the array reference happens-before the end of the constructor. An additional point which is always true, is that actions in one thread happen-before later actions in that same thread. So we can combine these by setting the array fields first, and then assigning the final field, so as to get this transitive guarantee of visibility. This will of course require a temporary variable:

public class ImmutableIntArray {

    private final int[] array;

    public ImmutableIntArray() {
        int[] tmp = new int[10];
        for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
            tmp[i] = i;
        }
        array = tmp;
    }

    // get() etc.
}

I think this is guaranteed to be safe, now that we've switched the seemingly irrelevant order of assignment and population.

But again, there might be something else I've missed which means the concurrency guarantees aren't as robust as hoped. This question is to my mind an excellent example of why writing bulletproof multithreaded code is tricky, even when you think you're doing something very simple, and how it takes a lot of thought and caution (and then bugfixes) to get right.

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1  
Could you add the relevant langSpec-link here? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Jul 8 '11 at 15:05
1  
@Paŭlo - good point, done. –  Andrzej Doyle Jul 8 '11 at 15:36
2  
I know final fields are guaranteed to be initialized - which is the array definition. Are the fields inside the array guaranteed to be initialized (to their assigned values, not 0) before the reference is returned (can't the optimizer choose when to return the reference otherwise)? –  Clockwork-Muse Jul 8 '11 at 15:48
1  
@X-Zero the interesting part is "It will also see versions of any object or array referenced by those final fields that are at least as up-to-date as the final fields are". But that itself isn't absolutely clear for me - I mean there's a situation in the code where the array itself is correctly initialized but its elements are still 0, I assume that the spec should be read in such a way to guarantee that we'll see the newest results, but I'm not 100% sure –  Voo Jul 8 '11 at 15:55
4  
Here is an old post which confirms that the code in the question effectively thread-safe with no need to do any additional tricks. tech.puredanger.com/2008/11/26/jmm-and-final-field-freeze –  denis.solonenko Sep 7 '11 at 7:37
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your example is not quite right. in order to get the final field assurance, you need:

public ImmutableIntArray() {
    int tmparray = new int[10];
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        tmparray[i] = i;
    }
    array = tmparray;
}
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Well, according to my understanding of the specification I suppose you are right. But anyway, in my opinion the specification is very confusing. Thank you for the answer! –  Tamás Jul 8 '11 at 16:20
    
+1: I just ended up deriving this same ordering without noticing that you'd already posted it. –  Andrzej Doyle Jul 8 '11 at 16:29
    
@Tamás - i completely agree about the spec. notice that i didn't state what guarantees final might give, only how to exploit them. :) –  jtahlborn Jul 8 '11 at 16:38
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I do think that you're afforded the same semantics with an array as with a final reference to an object. The spec states

A thread that can only see a reference to an object after that object has been completely initialized is guaranteed to see the correctly initialized values for that object's final fields.

It also says

It will also see versions of any object or array referenced by those final fields that are at least as up-to-date as the final fields are.

http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/memory.html#17.5

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