Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a custom view in my application, which is layer-backed and embedded in an NSScrollView. I allow the user to zoom in (which is accomplished by increasing the size of my custom view). I'm having trouble zooming in on an arbitrary point, though, since the NSScrollView keeps getting in the way and causing the view to jump around (typically to the view's origin) before I point it to the new scroll point. I would really like to use a CAScrollLayer, since I know I could definitely get the zooming right with it and have it move smoothly, but then I lose all built-in scrolling facilities.

Is there any way to leverage CAScrollLayer within an NSScrollView, possibly backing the NSClipView? If not, what purpose does CAScrollLayer actually serve? Is it possible, with a different approach, to change my view's size and the scroll point atomically and have that animate?

In short, is CAScrollLayer completely useless, or mostly useless?

Update

I've gotten my inner view to jump around less by making a CALayer subclass to display my view's contents. Rather than sizing with layout constraints, I have it sizing in an override of -resizeWithOldSuperlayerSize:. I still can't change the frame size and origin of my view simultaneously and get a smooth animation, though. To get a sense of what I'm looking for, open an image in Preview and zoom in and out. It zooms about the center of the image in a smooth manner.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

In the limit, you can use an NSScroller instead; that way you would be able to use CAScrollLayer, if that’s your preferred implementation.

Note that on some (older) versions of Mac OS X, NSScroller has a bug that causes it to invoke an Apple private method on its containing view. You’ll know if this happens because you’ll get an exception about your custom view not responding to a method starting with an ‘_’.

share|improve this answer
    
NSScroller doesn't provide any UI chrome though, correct? Do you have any examples of where it has been used to achieve a similar effect? OS version isn't an issue, as I will be requiring Lion (or possibly Mountain Lion, depending on when I ship). –  Dov May 14 '12 at 17:53
    
NSScroller is what NSScrollView uses, and yes, it “provides the UI chrome” (if by that you mean it is responsible for drawing the scroll bar). We use it in iDefrag (the block view is actually drawn using OpenGL, and we do our own scrolling because of precision issues with float coordinates in 32-bit AppKit). –  alastair May 17 '12 at 13:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.