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According to the documentation: http://www.sqlalchemy.org/docs/06/core/schema.html?highlight=index#indexes

and the comments in the sqlalchemy.Column class, we should use the class sqlalchemy.schema.Index to specify an index that contain multiple multiple index.

However, the example shows how to do it by directly using the Table object like this:

meta = MetaData()
mytable = Table('mytable', meta,
    # an indexed column, with index "ix_mytable_col1"
    Column('col1', Integer, index=True),

    # a uniquely indexed column with index "ix_mytable_col2"
    Column('col2', Integer, index=True, unique=True),

    Column('col3', Integer),
    Column('col4', Integer),

    Column('col5', Integer),
    Column('col6', Integer),
    )

# place an index on col3, col4
Index('idx_col34', mytable.c.col3, mytable.c.col4)

How should we do it if we use the declarative ORM extension?

class A(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'table_A'
    id = Column(Integer, , primary_key=True)
    a = Column(String(32))
    b = Column(String(32))

I would like an index on column "a" and "b".

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1 Answer 1

up vote 29 down vote accepted

those are just Column objects, index=True flag works normally:

class A(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'table_A'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    a = Column(String(32), index=True)
    b = Column(String(32), index=True)

if you'd like a composite index, again Table is present here as usual you just don't have to declare it, everything works the same (make sure you're on recent 0.6 or 0.7 for the declarative A.a wrapper to be interpreted as a Column after the class declaration is complete):

class A(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'table_A'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    a = Column(String(32))
    b = Column(String(32))

Index('my_index', A.a, A.b)

In 0.7 the Index can be in the Table arguments too, which with declarative is via __table_args__:

class A(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'table_A'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    a = Column(String(32))
    b = Column(String(32))
    __table_args__ = (Index('my_index', "a", "b"), )
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I updated to 0.7 and using the table_args works fine –  yorjo Jul 12 '11 at 14:57
1  
What happens if you have a dictionary for table_args like I currently do? table_args = {'mysql_engine':'InnoDB'} –  Nick Holden Sep 1 '11 at 8:39
    
@Nick sqlalchemy.org/docs/orm/extensions/… –  Joe Holloway Oct 12 '11 at 20:30
2  
So I guess I can do table_args = (Index('my_index', "a", "b"),{'mysql_engine':'InnoDB'}) –  Nick Holden Oct 19 '11 at 11:21
    
I'm using sqlalchemy 0.8 with flask extension and third example causes me an error: AttributeError: Neither 'Function' object nor 'Comparator' object has an attribute 'key' –  Ellochka Cannibal Feb 3 at 10:02

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