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I have some configuration options for a program stored in a JSON file. I want to be able to access the options in several different classes without explicitly having to open the file and read the configuration in each class. Is there a good, DRY way to do this?

I tried creating a module which reads the configuration into a class variable, and just include the module in every class, but is this a good use of class variables? Reading this makes me wary of class variables.

Here is what I have right now:

module Config
  @@config = nil

  def self.included(base)
    if @@config.nil?
      open('config.json', 'r') { |f| @@config = JSON.load(f) }
    end
  end
end

Thanks!

Update:

Maybe it's better just to place all the classes that require the configuration under it's own namespace?

module MyFishTank
  Config = { "location" => "My room" }

  Class Fish
    def location
      Config['location']
    end
  end
end

fish = MyFishTank::Fish.new
puts fish.location #=> "My room"
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why not something like this:

module Configured
  def config
    # memoize config upon load
    @config ||= 'foo'
  end
end

class A
  extend Configured

  def initialize
    puts A.config # or
    puts self.class.config
  end
end

A.new
#=> foo

Edit: if you want to avoid class method invocation (which seems wrong to me, as the configuration is indeed class-wide, not instance-wide), you can do something like:

module Configured
  def self.included(base)
    base.define_singleton_method :config do
      @config ||= 'foo'
    end
  end

  def config
    self.class.config
  end
end

class A
  include Configured

  def initialize
    puts config
  end
end

A.new

Though there probably is more succinct way of doing it.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way to avoid typing the class name every time I want to retrieve a configuration option? I could do @conf = A.config in every class, but while it's an improvement to what I had before, I don't think it's completely DRY. –  cyang Jul 8 '11 at 16:31
    
@cyang: See the edited answer. I am not sure if omitting the class method call could be seen as DRY. –  Mladen Jablanović Jul 8 '11 at 17:03
    
You raise a good point that the configuration isn't only instance wide, but since it's being applied to different classes, maybe it shouldn't be treated as a class method either? I updated my question with another option—put all my classes under a namespace that has the configuration set. Does this go against any best practices? –  cyang Jul 8 '11 at 18:57
    
It is applied to different classes, but through a common mixin (that's just what mixins are for). Using namespaces doesn't seem right for the purpose, as a class can belong to only one (immediate) parent namespace and you probably have more suitable parent for your classes. Being configurable is just yet another characteristic of your classes, not even the main one. Therefore, I'd advise to go with mixins. –  Mladen Jablanović Jul 8 '11 at 22:21
    
Okay, I see. The more I look at your solution, the more it makes sense. Thanks so much for your help! –  cyang Jul 9 '11 at 14:32

You could look at how others have tried to solve this problem also. For example check out RConfig or Configatron.

In my last project I used Configatron, and quite liked it, but I think for the next project I'm going to give RConfig a shot. Configatron may have a bit too much magic built into it, and RConfig looks like a more straight forward solution.

You could also use them as a base. I think you cold add JSON support to RConfig quite easily, and have a generalized config solution from there for future projects too...

RConfig:
https://github.com/rahmal/rconfig

Configatron:
https://github.com/markbates/configatron

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