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Suppose that long ago somebody placed an important piece of Personally Identifiable Information in the comments of some source code.

Suppose further that the source code lived in a still active CVS repository, and that this repo was in turn imported into a Git repository (and a few clones, naturally) at some point.

In this nightmare scenario, are any of the following solutions available in either CVS or Git:

  • Delete files from repositories completely, so that old versions with the PII cannot be checked out, or

  • Modify all past revisions so that the PII was replaced with X's, say?

I have a feeling it might be possible with CVS, and probably not at all in Git, but I'm not sure.

Thanks for your help.

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I think you might get better answers by asking this question in two parts -- one for git and one for cvs –  Andrew Aylett Jul 8 '11 at 16:30
    
possible duplicate of Removing a specific revision from the Git history –  Karl Bielefeldt Jul 8 '11 at 17:32
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up vote 5 down vote accepted

For git, I think it's rather easy, because you are free to edit all history (on repositories, you have write access too, obviously, i.e. the clones of course will stay as are until they are updated again and garbage-collected). See here:

http://help.github.com/remove-sensitive-data/

I guess, for CVS, you can even work directly on the RCS files but I am not very experienced with CVS.

Addition: as it's not about removing some files but basically changing some files "before they were ever comitted", it might already be enough to do a git rebase -i and edit those commits that introduced PII. You will probably need to fix some conflicts in the commits that later removed the PII but I guess, that's ok. The advantage is that you only need to fix those commits that actually introduced/changed the PII.

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Thanks: That's exactly what I'm looking for vis-a-vis Git. For CVS I may be able to edit the individual "*,v" files, but I'm not sure if that would corrupt them. –  David Jul 8 '11 at 16:57
    
@David, I'd strongly advise against fiddling with the *,v files, not even using the rcs(1) set of commands. CVS uses a modified version of RCS, and keeps information on how the individual RCS file versions hang together somewhere else. Changing an *,v file corrupts the repository, and CVS is quite sensitive to that. It probably can be done, just as brain surgery can... –  vonbrand Jan 25 '13 at 17:39
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