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Is this a valid way to refresh part of webpage:

$("#content").load(location.href+" #content>*","");

Note that I'm not requesting any new data here, but basically re-loading the content of a div as part of an .ajax success function.

This seems much easier than requesting data through an ajax function and loading that into the page, but I'm wondering if there are any drawbacks or issues with this method.

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This seems much easier than requesting data through an ajax function and loading that into the page,

The .load() method sends an AJAX request, so no, it's not easier, it's absolutely the same :-) In addition to the standard $.get(), $.post() and $.ajax() methods it allows you to provide a selector so that you can fetch only some portion of the returned HTML during the AJAX request. Maybe it is this that makes it more convenient in some situations. But behind the scenes all of those method end up calling $.ajax(). They are just shorthands.

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It's not the same, the difference is that here I'm not returning any HTML during the ajax request, I'm using the HTML that's already in the webpage. Maybe I should have made that more clear. – rolling stone Jul 8 '11 at 16:16
    
@rolling stone, when you say it's easier that depends on your situation. For example the .load method doesn't provide you with a callback to handle errors. So if in your scenario you wanted to do this probably that's not the right method for you. It's all very subjective. So if you find it useful, go ahead and use it. There are no drawbacks. I don't know what kind of answer are you expecting. – Darin Dimitrov Jul 8 '11 at 16:18
    
I'm referring to this part of the method: location.href+" #content>*","" my question is not just about the .load method in general. I'm not returning new data to load, I'm using .load() to re-load the content of an existing div. – rolling stone Jul 8 '11 at 16:22
    
so what exactly are you trying to refresh or load then? How is this different from grabbing the innerHTML of the element in question and just assigning it to the innerHTML of the element you want? – thescientist Jul 8 '11 at 16:23
    
@thescientist I've got a JQuery function that updates some user info in the database, and rather than request some new html to load into the div, I'm wondering if I can just refresh the div itself and have the updated content appear that way. – rolling stone Jul 8 '11 at 16:26

If you want to refresh part of a web page, say the content inside a element which has an ID or class of "content" : <div id="content" class="content">Content to refresh via ajax...</div>

$('#content').load('ajax/newcontent.html');

or

$('.content').load('ajax/newcontent.html');

The content returned from the url "ajax/newcontent.html" will replace the content inside the div element with an id or class = "content".

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yes, i know. the point of the question is whether using location.href+" #content>*","" is a valid and acceptable way of doing this since it's much simpler than the traditional method you describe. – rolling stone Jul 8 '11 at 16:30
    
The part of your expression " #content > *" means that from the content fragment/document you are returning, parse and look for an element of id "content" inside it and take the markup within it and then load it into your page element id "content". I am not sure that's what you want to do. – VajNyiaj Jul 8 '11 at 16:37
    
no, you're missing the location.href+ part. I'm not returning any content, I'm re-loading any content on the page that has a containing element with the id "content". I should add I've used this method before and it seems to work successfully. It feels a bit hack-ish though so I'm just trying to make sure it works consistently in all environments. – rolling stone Jul 8 '11 at 16:41
up vote 1 down vote accepted

On this page: http://blog.mediasoft.be/partial-page-refresh-with-ajax-and-jquery/ it appears that some people are having trouble getting this to work on IE, so I'm going to assume it's not 100% reliable yet and will continue to use the standard way of refreshing content using JQuery for now.

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Actually there are no issues, the load action is a wrapper for jQuery.ajax it makes also some validations and assigns the html to the selected element.

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Thanks @aruss. Just to be clear I'm not returning any HTML during the load action, but rather loading HTML from a div that's in the current webpage. – rolling stone Jul 8 '11 at 16:20
    
i was referring to the action load loads content from location.href and assigns it to $("#content") element – aruss Jul 8 '11 at 16:23
    
yes, I should add I've used this method before and it seems to work successfully. It feels a bit hack-ish though so I'm just trying to make sure it works consistently in all environments. – rolling stone Jul 8 '11 at 16:28

You could reload a section of the visible page using iframes, if you can accept their limitations.

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Thanks @aruss. Just to be clear I'm not returning any HTML during the load action, but rather loading HTML from a div that's in the current webpage. – rolling stone 11 mins ago

--

Then there is no need to use the load() method. It's as simple as

$('#content').empty().html($('#idOfContentNeeded').html());

share|improve this answer
    
I should probably have explained this better. I've got a JQuery function that updates some user info in the database, and rather than request some new html to load into the div, I'm wondering if I can just refresh the div itself and have the updated content appear that way. I'm not adding HTML from one element to another, I'm re-loading an element that should appear with updated content based on the data that was updated in the db. – rolling stone Jul 8 '11 at 16:46

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