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I commonly employ a while loop that continues to try some operation until either the operation succeeds or a timeout has elapsed:

bool success = false
int elapsed = 0
while( ( !success ) && ( elapsed < 10000 ) )
{
     Thread.sleep( 1000 );
     elapsed += 1000;
     success = ... some operation ...     
}

I know there a couple of way to implement this, but the basic point is that I repeatedly try some operation with a sleep until success or I've slept too long in aggregate.

Is there a built-in .net class/method/etc to save me from re-writing this pattern all over the place? Perhaps input is an Func(of bool) and the timeout?

Edit
Thanks to all who contributed. I opted for the sleep() approach because it was the least complicated and I'm totally anti-complexity =) Here's my (still needs to be tested) implimentation:

 public static bool RetryUntilSuccessOrTimeout( Func<bool> task , TimeSpan timeout , TimeSpan pause )
    {

        if ( pause.TotalMilliseconds < 0 )
        {
            throw new ArgumentException( "pause must be >= 0 milliseconds" );
        }
        var stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        do
        {
            if ( task() ) { return true; }
            Thread.Sleep( ( int )pause.TotalMilliseconds );
        }
        while ( stopwatch.Elapsed < timeout );
        return false;
    }
share|improve this question
    
You tagged with two .NET Framework versions, so which are you looking to have a solution compatible with? –  BoltClock Jul 8 '11 at 19:11
    
I don't know of a utility that will do this for your, but you might try building an extension method (maybe of 'object') ... but that may be all a little too disconnected and abstract... –  Cos Callis Jul 8 '11 at 19:13
    
@BoltClock - sorry, I'm on 4.0 –  SFun28 Jul 8 '11 at 19:23
    
All - wow! I didn't expect so many answers. bear with me while I digest it all. =) –  SFun28 Jul 8 '11 at 19:26

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You could wrap your algorithm in a method:

public bool RetryUntilSuccessOrTimeout(Func<bool> task, TimeSpan timeSpan)
{
    bool success = false;
    int elapsed = 0;
    while ((!success) && (elapsed < timeSpan.TotalMilliseconds))
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        elapsed += 1000;
        success = task();
    }
    return success;
}

and then:

if (RetryUntilSuccessOrTimeout(() => SomeTask(arg1, arg2), TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10)))
{
    // the task succeeded
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks! looks like the same solution as scottm (or vice-versa =) –  SFun28 Jul 8 '11 at 19:34
    
@SFun28, I have posted my solution 19 minutes ago, while @scottm posted his 18 minutes ago. Up to you to decide whose solution came first. –  Darin Dimitrov Jul 8 '11 at 19:35
    
I like that your function returns the true/false result and also good function name! Thanks, Darin! –  SFun28 Jul 8 '11 at 20:07

I don't know that there's any existing thing, but I would think you could create a method to that would accept the timeout and the success-determination function. Something like this:

public static bool KeepTrying(int timeout, Func<bool> operation)
{
    bool success = false;
    int elapsed = 0;
    while ((!success) && (elapsed < timeout))
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        elapsed += 1000;
        success = operation();
    }
    return success;
}

or maybe your Function could be more "robust" and you could couple it with flexible arguments:

public bool KeepTrying(int timeout, Func<object[], bool> operation, params object[] arguments)
{
    bool success = false;
    int elapsed = 0;
    while ((!success) && (elapsed < timeout))
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        elapsed += 1000;
        success = operation(arguments);
    }
    return success;
}
share|improve this answer
    
good idea about robustness! After all, I might want to specify arguments to my function. Wondering if there's a way that I can pre-construct the Func with arguments and take advantage of the closure? –  SFun28 Jul 8 '11 at 19:39
    
@SFun28 you'd have to overload the function and pass in however many arguments you want to allow. For example, look at these overloads: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd402862.aspx –  scottm Jul 8 '11 at 19:43

Others have mentioned thread synchronization techniques, which would allow you to wait until some task is finished. However, if you want to continue polling every second like you are doing, you can wrap that method like this:

void Main()
{
    Timeout(() => {return false;});
}

public void Timeout(Func<bool> action, int timeout)
{
    bool success = false;
    int elapsed = 0;
    while( ( !success ) && ( elapsed < timeout ) )
    {
         Thread.Sleep( 1000 );
         elapsed += 1000;
         success = action();
    }
    Console.WriteLine("timed out.");
}
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, scottm! This is a good "roll-your-own" solution. –  SFun28 Jul 8 '11 at 19:29

You can abstract shorten your code a bit and generalize the Timeout:

int timer = 0;
while (!SomeOperation(...) && Timeout(ref timer, 1000, 10000));

public bool Timeout(ref int timer, int increment, int maximum)
{
    timer += increment;
    Thread.Sleep(increment);

    return timer < maximum;
}
share|improve this answer
    
hmm...this doesn't seem as elegant as scottm's solution –  SFun28 Jul 8 '11 at 19:35
    
I never said it was. I'm just throwing an option out there. –  m-y Jul 8 '11 at 19:36
    
fair enough. thanks! –  SFun28 Jul 8 '11 at 19:49

You really should not have to use Sleep() to wait for tasks to complete. You waste an average of 500ms after the task has completed by doing this.

You ought to be able to do this deterministically using Task Parallel Library, see here for example.

This example shows how to use the Wait method, or its equivalent in the Task class, to wait on a single task. It also shows how to use the static WaitAll and WaitAny methods to wait on multiple tasks.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you mean the waste is attributed to the Sleep() method itself or because I might sleeping when the operation would have completed? What if the operation requires a network call (i.e. something you do not necessarily want to keep firing out without some kind of pause in-between calls? Also, there's the issue of waiting for something that doesn't complete (even with a timeout, I don't want to keep a thread in an infinite loop) –  SFun28 Jul 8 '11 at 19:43
    
Sleep() will wait for 1 second even if the operation completes 1ms after the Sleep() was called. That's what I meant. For waiting for possibly infinite operations, there are Wait(timeout) options as shown in that example and also for regular Synchronization using Events, Semaphores etc for cross-thread signalling. If the operation requires a delay between invocations, have it fire from a callback on System.Threading.Timers.Timer rather than hanging up your thread in Sleep. –  Steve Townsend Jul 8 '11 at 19:48
    
Great idea about the Timer. So I get the idea of launching a task and waiting for it to complete given a timeout, but after that timeout I have to signal for the Timer to stop. And of course if the operation succeeds before the timeout I want to stop immediately. I'm not sure how I put all of this together...seems like a complicated mix of Timer class and TPL –  SFun28 Jul 8 '11 at 19:56
    
Good threaded code is indeed hard to write. TPL certainly makes it easier though. Code defensively (try..catch is your friend) and test extensively. Prototyping a new improved design in C# is a lot easier than native code would be. –  Steve Townsend Jul 8 '11 at 19:58

You need to use Thread.Join. From MSDN,

Blocks the calling thread until a thread terminates, while continuing to perform standard COM and SendMessage pumping.

If you want to wait until a specified time elapses, then use the Thread.Join (TimeSpan) method. .NET 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 only.

Blocks the calling thread until a thread terminates or the specified time elapses, while continuing to perform standard COM and SendMessage pumping.

This tutorial on how to use Threads in C# will help you.

share|improve this answer
    
The purpose of Thread.Join is to block the current thread till the activity which is being performed on it ends. –  Hasan Fahim Jul 8 '11 at 19:16
    
@Hasan: What do you think his While loop is doing? Also, Thread.Join continues to perform standard COM and SendMessage pumping so as to not block the UI thread. –  user195488 Jul 8 '11 at 19:17
    
If you look at the article you provided. It is mentioned in it that "Use this method to ensure a thread has terminated. The caller will block indefinitely if the thread does not terminate. If the thread has already terminated when Join is called, the method returns immediately" –  Hasan Fahim Jul 8 '11 at 19:24
    
@Hasan: Exactly, then there is no time to wait. What is the problem? –  user195488 Jul 8 '11 at 19:24
1  
@0A0D (cool name) - Thread.Join(TimeSpan) is not the solution in itself right? I would have to launch another thread with the while loop...and although the timeout would guarantee that I move on, what happens if the launched thread is now in an infinite loop? I'm having trouble seeing the full solution here. –  SFun28 Jul 8 '11 at 19:33

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