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lets say I have something like this (client side code):

TrustManager[] trustAllCerts = new TrustManager[]{
    new X509TrustManager() {

        @Override
        public java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
            return null;
        }

        @Override
        public void checkClientTrusted(
                java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] certs, String authType) {
        }

        @Override
        public void checkServerTrusted(
                java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] certs, String authType) {
        }
    }
};

SSLContext sslc = SSLContext.getInstance("TLS");
sslc.init(null, trustAllCerts, null);

SocketFactory sf = sslc.getSocketFactory();
SSLSocket s = (SSLSocket) sf.createSocket("127.0.0.1", 9124);

This code is complete functional, but I really can not figure out, how to validate server's certificate against one concrete CA certificate that I have available in pem file.

All certificates are signed by my self-signed CA, and it is the CA I need to validate against (only against this one).

Every answer is appreciated.

EDIT:

In response to jglouie (thank you very much this way - can not vote up your answer).

I founded the solution:

new X509TrustManager() {

        @Override
        public java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] getAcceptedIssuers() {
            return null;
        }

        @Override
        public void checkClientTrusted(
                java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] certs, String authType) {
        }

        @Override
        public void checkServerTrusted(
                java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] certs, String authType)
                throws CertificateException {
            InputStream inStream = null;
            try {
                // Loading the CA cert
                URL u = getClass().getResource("tcp/cacert.pem");
                inStream = new FileInputStream(u.getFile());
                CertificateFactory cf = CertificateFactory.getInstance("X.509");
                X509Certificate ca = (X509Certificate) cf.generateCertificate(inStream);
                inStream.close();

                for (X509Certificate cert : certs) {
                    // Verifing by public key
                    cert.verify(ca.getPublicKey());
                }
            } catch (Exception ex) {
                Logger.getLogger(Client.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
            } finally {
                try {
                    inStream.close();
                } catch (IOException ex) {
                    Logger.getLogger(Client.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
                }
            }

        }
    }
};
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I assume that the self-signed certificate of your CA is already loaded as follows:

CertificateFactory cf = CertificateFactory.getInstance("X.509");   
FileInputStream finStream = new FileInputStream("CACertificate.pem"); 
X509Certificate caCertificate = (X509Certificate)cf.generateCertificate(finStream);  

Then in the method to check certificate:

@Override        
 public void checkServerTrusted(java.security.cert.X509Certificate[] certs, String authType)  throws CertificateException {

 if (certs == null || certs.length == 0) {  
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("null or zero-length certificate chain");  
 }  

 if (authType == null || authType.length() == 0) {  
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("null or zero-length authentication type");  
  }  

   //Check if certificate send is your CA's
    if(!certs[0].equals(caCertificate)){
         try
         {   //Not your CA's. Check if it has been signed by your CA
             certs[0].verify(caCertificate.getPublicKey())
         }
         catch(Exception e){   
              throw new CertificateException("Certificate not trusted",e);
         }
    }
    //If we end here certificate is trusted. Check if it has expired.  
     try{
          certs[0].checkValidity();
      }
      catch(Exception e){
            throw new CertificateException("Certificate not trusted. It has expired",e);
      }  
}

Disclaimer: Have not even atempted to compile the code

share|improve this answer

Get your CA (issuer) as an X509Certificate object and implement TrustManager::getAcceptedIssuers() to return an array with one element, your CA's X509Certificate.

From X509Certificate Doc

Certificates are instantiated using a certificate factory. The following is an example of how to instantiate an X.509 certificate:

 InputStream inStream = new FileInputStream("fileName-of-cert");
 CertificateFactory cf = CertificateFactory.getInstance("X.509");
 X509Certificate cert = (X509Certificate)cf.generateCertificate(inStream);
 inStream.close();

EDIT:

In response to the comment, try an implementation similar to this for checkServerTrusted(). This is not production quality but you should get the idea: compare the bytes of the CA claimed by the server with the one you know for sure.

public void checkServerTrusted(X509Certificate[] chain, String authType)
        throws CertificateException {
    if (chain == null || chain.length == 0 || authType == null
            || authType.length() == 0) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("null or zero-length parameter");
    }

    if (isDirectlyTrustedCert(chain)) {
        return;
    }

    // your particular setup shouldn't get here -- throw a CertificateException?
    ...
}

private boolean isDirectlyTrustedCert(X509Certificate[] chain) {
    byte[] questionable;

    if (chain.length == 1) {
      return Array.equals(chain[0].getEncoded(), YOUR_CA_X509.getEncoded());
    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that was the first I tried. But method TrustManager::getAcceptedIssuers() is not called during connection process. –  Jakub Truneček Jul 8 '11 at 19:49
    
Are exceptions being thrown? –  jglouie Jul 8 '11 at 19:54
    
No, this code sdilejkod.cz/kod/k2432zzyp1#kod outpust C (and client is right connected), so during connection to server (local server is running) is called just checkServerTrusted(). So there I will have to check the certificate, and I can not figure out how to do it. I have two objects of class X509Certificate (server cert and CA cert) but I don't know how to validate that server's one against CA's. –  Jakub Truneček Jul 8 '11 at 20:01
    
@Jakub compare the X509 raw bytes via getEncoded(). see update above –  jglouie Jul 8 '11 at 20:17
    
Thank you for your patient, I founded solution (you show me the way ;)). See question update. –  Jakub Truneček Jul 8 '11 at 20:25

Let's hope you don't have that code at all, because it is completely insecure, as well as not even conforming to its own specification. There is rarely a need to supply your own TrustManager, the default one works really well.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I know now, I completely rewrote it. Anyway, thank you. –  Jakub Truneček Jul 11 '11 at 13:08
    
This is not really an answer, and is far from true. If you program a software, that will connect to a specific server over ssl, you should overwrite the TrustManager and actively check if the server you are connecting to is the one you trust. This helps you greatly against MIM attacks. –  stoilkov Apr 8 '13 at 14:21
    
@stoikov Certainly it's true, and your own statement is entirely false. You don't need to override the TrustManager to authorize the peer: you can get its certificate directly from the socket via the SSLSession, or via a handshake listener. In any case this TrustManager here doesn't do either: neither authorization nor even authentication, which is why I deprecate it strongly whenever I see it. –  EJP May 10 '13 at 12:25
1  
How this answer has 6 down votes? IMO is totally right! override TrustManager it's only for a rare cases normally when you're making some tests never in production mode... if as OP ask he want to validate a certificate against specific CA then create a truststore with only this CA instead of override TrustManager. –  albciff Oct 22 at 20:13

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