Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code and I would like to return the value of 'out' and print it to a file. How do I return the value of 'out' instead of the location. Also, how do I call the function uint32_pack from the main function? Thank you for your help.

#if HAVE_PROTOBUF_C_CONFIG_H
#include "protobuf-c-config.h"
#endif
#include <stdio.h>                      /* for occasional printf()s */
#include <stdlib.h>                     /* for abort(), malloc() etc */
#include <string.h>                     /* for strlen(), memcpy(), memmove() */
#if HAVE_ALLOCA_H
#include <alloca.h>
#elif HAVE_MALLOC_H
#include <malloc.h>
#endif

#include "protobuf-c.h"

int main(void){
uint32_t hexvalue = 0x20;
int gnuvalue;
uint8_t fake_out;
  FILE *fp;

  fp = fopen("binarydata.txt","w");
  gnuvalue = uint32_pack (hexvalue, fake_out);
  fprintf(fp,"%x",gnuvalue);
  fclose(fp);
}


/* === pack() === */
/* Pack an unsigned 32-bit integer in base-128 encoding, and return the number of bytes needed:
   this will be 5 or less. */
static inline size_t
uint32_pack (uint32_t value, uint8_t *out)
{
  unsigned rv = 0;

  if (value >= 0x80)
    {
      out[rv++] = value | 0x80;
      value >>= 7;
      if (value >= 0x80)
        {
          out[rv++] = value | 0x80;
          value >>= 7;
          if (value >= 0x80)
            {
              out[rv++] = value | 0x80;
              value >>= 7;
              if (value >= 0x80)
                {
                  out[rv++] = value | 0x80;
                  value >>= 7;
                }
            }
        }

  /* assert: value<128 */
  out[rv++] = value;
  return &out;
  }
}
share|improve this question
1  
just return *out –  Sam Dufel Jul 8 '11 at 19:41
    
I get the following errors now, "conflicting types for 'uint32_pack'" at line 56 and "previous implicit declaration of 'uint32_pack' was here" at ling43 –  negeo Jul 8 '11 at 19:51
    
You have to declare the function before you use it. It seems like you should brush up on the basics of C. –  dimatura Jul 8 '11 at 19:54
    
Indeedy. Methinks @Sam should go ahead and post his comment as an answer, since his comment actually precedes all of our answers as well. –  nil Jul 8 '11 at 19:56
    
gnuvalue is declare int, return *out would return uint8_t; though this is not problematic, it could be a clue that you arent doing what you mean –  ShinTakezou Jul 8 '11 at 20:00

3 Answers 3

You want to dereference the pointer using the * unary operator, like so:

return *out;

Doing this, it'll return the value stored at the location pointed to by out.

share|improve this answer

There something odd in your code here

  uint8_t fake_out;
  gnuvalue = uint32_pack (hexvalue, fake_out);

while the prototype for uint32_pack needs uint8_t *, so it should be &fake_out. And then to return it, you need just to dereference the pointer to modify fake_out,something like *out = value;.

If you need to return two values (gnuvalue and fake_out), this is how you can.

Another option could be to return a pointer to a struct malloc-ed in the function (then you need to free it soon or later), and the struct holds both "gnuvalue" and "fake_out".

share|improve this answer

You should return *out. And update the comment to reflect this. In practice it seems like out should fit in a size_t (i.e. sizeof size_t will be large enough) but it is hack-ish to assume it.

On calling from main, the current way won't work because fake_out is an uint8_t, not an uint8_t*. Of course &fakeout will crash so don't do that, you have to allocate a large enough array of uint8_t.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.