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I was wondering if it was possible to call a private method from another private method on Javascript. I have some code like the following:

function Balloon() {
function density( altitude, gas ) {
  /* KG/CU M */

  var gas = { 
   /* GAS DEFINATIONS - wolframalpha.com */
   "hydrogen" : .00100794,
   "helium"   : .004002602,
   "nitrogen" : .0140067,
   "methane"  : .0160425,
   "ammonia"  : .0170305,
   "neon"     : .0201791,
   "dry air"  : .0289644 
  }

  var alt = {
   /* CONSTANTS - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Density_of_air#Altitude */
   "p0" : 101325,   // Sea level standard atmospheric pressure (Pa)
   "T0" : 288.15,   // Sea level standard temperature (K) 
   "g"  : 9.80665,  // Earth-surface gravitational acceleration (m/s^2)
   "L"  : 0.0065,   // Temperature lapse rate (K/m)
   "R"  : 8.31447   // Universal gas constant (mol * K)
  }

  var temperature = alt["T0"] - alt["L"] * altitude;
  var pressure    = alt["p0"] * (1 - (( alt["L"] * altitude ) / alt["T0"] )) ^ (( alt["g"] * gas[gas] ) / ( alt["R"] * alt["L"] ));
  var density     = ( pressure * gas[gas] ) / ( alt["R"] * temperature );

  return density;
 }

 function lift( altitude, gas ) {
  /* KG/CU M */

  return density( altitude, "dry air" ) - density( altitude, gas ); 
 }

 this.requiredGas = function( altitude, gas, ratio, weight ) {
  return (( weight / 1000 ) * ratio ) / lift( altitude, gas );
 }
}

and am trying to access it like:

balloon = new Balloon();
var required = balloon.requiredGas(10, "helium", 1.5, 4530);

I have seen people declare this from outside the private functions like so, but don't know if that's how to approach this one.

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Your code looks fine. What's not working about it? –  Domenic Jul 8 '11 at 20:15
1  
@KyleHotchkiss: Are you sure it isn't? density is in the same scope as lift so that is no problem. It sounds more like you are not passing valid numbers to the function. –  Felix Kling Jul 8 '11 at 20:19
2  
lift is calling density; if you put an alert or console.log at the top of density you will see this to be true. The problem is likely that you are dividing by zero, i.e. that lift returns 0. –  Domenic Jul 8 '11 at 20:20
1  
jsfiddle.net/SLQTd –  Domenic Jul 8 '11 at 20:20
2  
@Domenic: "dry air" is not a valid number, that's why it returns NaN (n your case). Devision by 0 returns Infinity. –  Felix Kling Jul 8 '11 at 20:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are overriding the argument you pass into your density function with the gas array.

See, it works fine once I rename it!

http://jsfiddle.net/pEcMJ/

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Whoa. I didn't even think it was that. Thanks for pointing out my issue man! –  Kyle Hotchkiss Jul 8 '11 at 20:42
    
@Patrick McElhaney: Thanks, I'm a bit scattered right now :) –  josh.trow Jul 8 '11 at 20:55
    
@josh No, you're just fast. :-) –  Patrick McElhaney Jul 8 '11 at 20:58
    
@Patrick McElhaney: Thats not what she said (hopefully)? –  josh.trow Jul 8 '11 at 21:17

You are redefining your method parameter function density( altitude, gas ) with an object var gas ={}

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This line produces the NAN

var pressure    = alt["p0"] * (1 - (( alt["L"] * altitude ) / alt["T0"] )) ^ (( alt["g"] * gas[gas] ) / ( alt["R"] * alt["L"] )); 

It is gas[gas] :)

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