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I'm having some trouble understanding why the following doesn't result in a compiler error in 5.3.3 (errored-out correctly on my coworkers 5.2.5):

<?php
    echo "starting\n";

    switch(1) {
        case 2:
            echo "two\n";
            break;
        defalut:        // note the misspelling
            echo "deflaut\n";
    }

    echo "ending\n";

Instead of giving me a compiler error (or even a warning) it just gives this:

starting
ending

However, if I use it in an if-statement it gives me what I'd expect:

<?php
    if (1 == deflaut)
        echo "deflaut2\n";

gives:

PHP Notice:  Use of undefined constant deflaut - assumed 'deflaut' in ...

Why is this? Is there a setting somewhere I can disable to tell it to be strict about this sort of thing?

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Great question. I'm inclined to think it's a bug in 5.3.3 but I'm interested to see what the answers are. –  Endophage Jul 8 '11 at 21:05
2  
Not to mention the fact that so many people are reading the code but not the question :-P –  Endophage Jul 8 '11 at 21:05
    
@Ben: That's not the question. –  hakre Jul 8 '11 at 21:07
    
The changelog for version 5.1.0 states (among other things): "Improved performance of...switch() statement." This doesn't answer "why" but may at least provide a "when." –  George Cummins Jul 8 '11 at 21:07
    
@George Cummins as noted by the op, it errors correctly in 5.2.5 so whatever that change was in 5.1.0 probably doesn't apply. –  Endophage Jul 8 '11 at 21:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that your code isn't doing what you think. A case block only ends when the next case block occurs, or when default: is found, or when the closing } is reached. This means that defalut is part of the case 2: block. So it is never even interpreted.

However, it doesn't even fire a syntax error (not even if you do switch (2). This is because the goto operator was introduced in PHP 5.3. The syntax word: at the beginning of a PHP statement is now a target accessible via goto. So goto defalut; can be used to go to the label.

(Actually, it can't, because of a restriction on targets inside switch blocks to avoid infinite loops, but this should illustrate the point...)

You can make it force an error by doing case defalut, when the error that you expect is found.

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Great explanation that makes a lot of sense. +1 and thank you. –  Endophage Jul 8 '11 at 21:13
    
"This is because the goto operator was introduced in PHP 5.3." ಠ_ಠ –  fiXedd Dec 28 '12 at 20:26

It could possibly be interpreting it as just another label (which makes sense, given that technically default is a label and case could be interpreted as a special kind of label too) that could be used with goto. Try a goto and find out. I would, but I don't have PHP 5.3.3, sorry.

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This is correct. Similar issues exist in C/C++ bytes.com/topic/c/answers/217909-faulty-default –  Rodaine Jul 8 '11 at 21:02
    
Then why would it error in 5.2? Which version of PHP should be considered the one not handling it correctly? Or is this an intentional change? –  Endophage Jul 8 '11 at 21:04
1  
@minitech Correct, it's a php 5.3 goto label. @Endophage In PHP 5.2 goto was not available, so it errors out. –  hakre Jul 8 '11 at 21:05
1  
Not saying you're wrong, but it gave me an error trying to goto it: PHP Fatal error: 'goto' into loop or switch statement is disallowed in... –  fiXedd Jul 8 '11 at 21:07
4  
@fiXedd: The error shows clearly that's a goto label, because goto knows where it is and that it can't jump there. Just noting. –  hakre Jul 8 '11 at 21:11

Interesting, on my 5.3.2, this does fail IF there is NO other case statement above the mispelled default.

This dies with a "T_UNEXPECTED_STRING" syntax error:

switch (1) {
   defalut:
       echo "this should never come out";
       break;
   default:
       echo "default matched properly"
}

This one works:

switch (1) {
   case 2:
        echo "2\n";
        break;
   defalut:
        echo "this should never come out";
        break;
   default:
        echo "the default value\n";
}

It would appear you've found a bug in the PHP parser. Wouldn't consider a serious bug, but a bug nonetheless.

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1  
This is because all code in a switch construct must appear within a case or default. You would receive an unexpected anything if it isn't inside a case or default. Your second example is a label within a case so it compiles. –  webbiedave Jul 8 '11 at 21:33
    
Technically, the case should be considered closed by the break statement. But I guess if PHP's parse tree only closes on another case or an actual default, this'd make sense. –  Marc B Jul 8 '11 at 22:11

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