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First a little context: I use a collection management software, GCStar, to manage my digital library (comics/manga/films, you name it - it's pretty awesome except for books). Problem is, it doesn't let me sort the shelf by multiple keys, say by Series AND Episode number. Episodes added later will always show up lower in the shelf, grouped by Series.

I pattered around the configurations and found that the .gcs file it uses is nothing but an XML (which I am only cursorily familiar with). Goes like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<collection type="GCTVepisodes" items="101" version="1.6.1">
 <information>
  <maxId>101</maxId>
 </information>

 <item
  id="1"
  name="The Vice President Doesn't Say Anything about the Possibility of 
        Him Being the Main Character"
  series="Baccano"
  season="1"
  episode="1"
  ...
 >
  <synopsis>It's 1931 and...</synopsis>
 ...
 </item>
 <item ...

The program, far as I understand, will always order descending by ID (which increases whenever I add an episode). So I need a transform on this which will:

  1. Sort the XML by series, then season, then episode
  2. Change the id attributes accordingly, starting from 1 to end (also reset maxId based on that)
  3. Write it all out into identical format to another XML.

How to do this (not talking about cut-pasting code here, obviously)? Can XSLT do all this stuff? Should I look into a tree-based parser in Perl? This is the weekend and I'm on a Linux machine, so open-source solutions running on UNIX would be nice - something in Perl would probably be best. What should I read up on?

If I can't do this at home, well, I can always design a small datastage job at the office, but I'd seriously like a simpler solution.

Thanks! :)

share|improve this question

closed as too broad by Kevin Brown, rene, durron597, Deduplicator, TylerH Jul 4 '15 at 4:24

There are either too many possible answers, or good answers would be too long for this format. Please add details to narrow the answer set or to isolate an issue that can be answered in a few paragraphs.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
OK, so I'm DONE, people... :-D Hasn't been as easy as I'd hoped at first. Had to patch the GCStar code at a couple of places (good thing somebody else had already done the hard work with the Music model, was very easy to tweak it and apply to the TV Show model). Now the program sorts by id, and a little change in the program startup script makes sure I always run the XSLT so that the id's remain in good order. – Deep-B Jul 9 '11 at 19:12
    
+1 for the question. See my answer to know how to get the wanted result using just two simple templates. – Emiliano Poggi Jul 9 '11 at 21:45
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The maxId (and items in collection) value should not change, because you are not removing or adding ids.

If you want an easy commandline open-source XSLT transformator use XSLTProc from libxml2/libxslt. It is available on nearly every standard linux. http://xmlsoft.org/XSLT/xsltproc2.html

Use this command xsltproc transform.xsl input.xml >output.xml

And here is a solution, the XSLT transform stylesheet, that should work ;-) (I had enough free time to code it)

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8" ?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

<xsl:output method="xml" encoding="UTF-8" indent="yes"/>

<xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

<!-- Default: copy everything -->
<xsl:template match="@*|node()">
  <xsl:copy>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
  </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

<!-- remove items, they will be sorted and inserted later -->
<xsl:template match="/collection/item"/>

<!-- remove id -->
<xsl:template match="/collection/item/@id"/>

<xsl:template match="/collection">
    <xsl:copy>
        <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
        <!-- copy and sort item by series, then season, then episode -->
        <xsl:for-each select="item">
            <xsl:sort select="@series" data-type="text"/>
            <xsl:sort select="@season" data-type="number"/>
            <xsl:sort select="@episode" data-type="number"/>
            <xsl:copy>
                <xsl:attribute name="id">
                    <xsl:value-of select="position()"/>
                </xsl:attribute>
                <!-- copy the rest of item -->
                <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()"/>
            </xsl:copy>
        </xsl:for-each>
    </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

I used this simplified data to test it:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<collection type="GCTVepisodes" items="5" version="1.6.1">
 <information>
  <maxId>5</maxId>
 </information>

 <item
  id="1"
  name="The Vice President Doesn't Say Anything about the Possibility of 
        Him Being the Main Character"
  series="Baccano"
  season="1"
  episode="1"/>

 <item
  id="2"
  name="blabla"
  series="c"
  season="1"
  episode="2"/>

 <item
  id="3"
  name="abc"
  series="Baccano"
  season="2"
  episode="1"/>  

 <item
  id="4"
  name="blabla2"
  series="Baccano"
  season="1"
  episode="2"/>

 <item
  id="5"
  name="first of c"
  series="c"
  season="1"
  episode="1"/>

</collection>

And this is the result (look at how the position and id changed):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<collection type="GCTVepisodes" items="5" version="1.6.1">
  <information>
    <maxId>5</maxId>
  </information>
  <item id="1" name="The Vice President Doesn't Say Anything about the Possibility of    Him Being the Main Character" series="Baccano" season="1" episode="1"/>
  <item id="2" name="blabla2" series="Baccano" season="1" episode="2"/>
  <item id="3" name="abc" series="Baccano" season="2" episode="1"/>
  <item id="4" name="first of c" series="c" season="1" episode="1"/>
  <item id="5" name="blabla" series="c" season="1" episode="2"/>
</collection>
share|improve this answer
    
Well, I looked at it and understood it (been looking at the XSLT sort etc since this evening), and this should've worked... except it doesn't. Looks like we need to sort numerically, otherwise episode 1 is followed by 10, 11, 12 etc. I think I've seen a DATATYPE=NUMBER kind of thing in an example XSL somewhere... ideas? – Deep-B Jul 8 '11 at 22:20
    
yes, maybe it doesn't work as aspected. I have not tested it with longer numbers. I will edit my post and add datatype=number to the right places. Here is a good reference site for XSLT: w3schools xsl:sort – therealmarv Jul 8 '11 at 22:25
    
+1 for a great start. Should be more than enough to start him up on his project. – Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 8 '11 at 22:32
    
Thanks a lot! data-type = number did the trick. However, for some reason gcstar refuses to load the new XML... sigh... need to check this more thoroughly... – Deep-B Jul 8 '11 at 22:34
    
Check if the structure, and especially the arrangement of elements is the same as before. Are there some tags/elements after items in /collection? – therealmarv Jul 8 '11 at 22:58

You can get the same result using two simple templates:

  • In the first template (the identity) we can just slightly "orient" the apply templates mechanism in order to sort item elements.
  • In the second template we can override each item element, and use the position() function to recompute the id attribute. We will leave every other descendant node as is, but excluding the original id of the item.

XSLT 1.0 transform tested with Saxon 6.5.5

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
    <xsl:output indent="yes"/>
    <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

    <xsl:template match="@*|node()">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()[not(self::item)]"/>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="item">
                <xsl:sort select="@series"/>
                <xsl:sort select="@season" data-type="number"/>
                <xsl:sort select="@episode" data-type="number"/>
            </xsl:apply-templates>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <xsl:template match="item">
        <item id="{position()}">
            <xsl:apply-templates select="@*[name()!='id']|node()"/>
        </item>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

When the above transform is applied to the following input (@therealmarv a bit modified to include children elements):

<collection type="GCTVepisodes" items="5" version="1.6.1">
    <information>
        <maxId>5</maxId>
    </information>
    <item
        id="1"
        name="The Vice President Doesn't Say Anything about the Possibility of 
        Him Being the Main Character"
        series="Baccano"
        season="1"
        episode="1">
        <synopsis>It's 1931 and...</synopsis>
    </item>
    <item
        id="2"
        name="blabla"
        series="c"
        season="1"
        episode="2">
        <synopsis>It's 1931 and...</synopsis>
    </item>
    <item
        id="3"
        name="abc"
        series="Baccano"
        season="2"
        episode="1">
        <synopsis>It's 1931 and...</synopsis>
    </item>
    <item
        id="4"
        name="blabla2"
        series="Baccano"
        season="1"
        episode="2">
        <synopsis>It's 1931 and...</synopsis>
    </item>
    <item
        id="5"
        name="first of c"
        series="c"
        season="1"
        episode="1">
        <synopsis>It's 1931 and...</synopsis>
    </item>
</collection>

The following output is produced:

<collection type="GCTVepisodes" items="5" version="1.6.1">
   <information>
      <maxId>5</maxId>
   </information>
   <item id="1" name="The Vice President Doesn't Say Anything about the Possibility of    Him Being the Main Character" series="Baccano" season="1" episode="1">
      <synopsis>It's 1931 and...</synopsis>
   </item>
   <item id="4" name="blabla2" series="Baccano" season="1" episode="2">
      <synopsis>It's 1931 and...</synopsis>
   </item>
   <item id="3" name="abc" series="Baccano" season="2" episode="1">
      <synopsis>It's 1931 and...</synopsis>
   </item>
   <item id="5" name="first of c" series="c" season="1" episode="1">
      <synopsis>It's 1931 and...</synopsis>
   </item>
   <item id="2" name="blabla" series="c" season="1" episode="2">
      <synopsis>It's 1931 and...</synopsis>
   </item>
</collection>
share|improve this answer
    
nice and clean solution. +1 – therealmarv Jul 10 '11 at 0:47
1  
I received a downvote for this answer recently. Downvote without explanations are bad, because I could miss the reason of downvote, and I can't argue against or in favour. Please provide your reasons when you downvote. I don't care about downvote, I care about correcting my answers, I care about having good answers here in SO. – Emiliano Poggi May 25 '15 at 7:56
1  
Every answer on this question now has a downvote. I too would like to know the reason(s). – Daniel Haley May 27 '15 at 16:55

Can XSLT do all this stuff?

Yes. See the sub-answers below

  • Sort the XML by series, then season, then episode

Yes you can use XSLT to sort XML.

http://www.w3schools.com/xsl/xsl_sort.asp

  • Change the id attributes accordingly, starting from 1 to end (also reset maxId based on that)

You can also use it to write any text you want. Which means you can replace data in your transform.

It also can assign variables, do if statements, loops, do XPath queries, has a built-in function library, etc, so it will be more than powerful enough for what you want to do.

  • Write it all out into identical format to another XML

...Which also means you can use it to write XML

What should I read up on?

XSLT :)

The w3schools links (all the links above) were plenty for me, but I was already familiar with the XML structure, in general (attributes, elements, root element, inner text, etc). If you are familiar with that, just read up on XSLT.

You could also look into XmlStarlet, which is a tool designed to query and transform XML from the command line or shell scripts/batch files (though for transformations, it might use XSLT anyhow).

share|improve this answer
    
OK... presumably I can use xsltproc from my shell to execute the stylesheet? Looking into the links now... – Deep-B Jul 8 '11 at 21:54
    
@Deep-B: Sure can. "xsltproc is a command line tool for applying XSLT stylesheets to XML documents". xmlsoft.org/XSLT/xsltproc.html – Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 8 '11 at 21:57
    
@Deep-B: You can also use your browser. They all support most of the XSLT 1.0 and XPath 1.0 Specs. Webkit uses libxslt. – Saxoier Jul 8 '11 at 22:06

I would also do this with XSLT. However, my stylesheet is a little different than therealmarv's stylsheet.

This XML input:

<collection type="GCTVepisodes" items="101" version="1.6.1">
  <information>
    <maxId>101</maxId>
  </information>

  <item
    id="1"
    name="The Vice President Doesn't Say Anything about the Possibility of 
    Him Being the Main Character"
    series="Baccano"
    season="1"
    episode="2"
    >
    <synopsis>Blah blah blah...</synopsis>
    ...
  </item>

  <item
    id="2"
    name="some name"
    series="Alpha"
    season="2"
    episode="1"
    >
    <synopsis>Blah blah blah...</synopsis>
    ...
  </item>


  <item
    id="3"
    name="The Vice President Doesn't Say Anything about the Possibility of 
    Him Being the Main Character"
    series="Baccano"
    season="1"
    episode="1"
    >
    <synopsis>It's 1931 and...</synopsis>
    ...
  </item>

  <item
    id="4"
    name="some name"
    series="Alpha"
    season="1"
    episode="1"
    >
    <synopsis>Blah blah blah...</synopsis>
    ...
  </item>

</collection>

with this stylesheet:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
  <xsl:output indent="yes"/>
  <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

  <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
    <xsl:copy>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
    </xsl:copy>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="collection">
    <collection>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="@*"/>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="information"/>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="item">
        <xsl:sort select="@series" data-type="text"/>
        <xsl:sort select="@season" data-type="number"/>
        <xsl:sort select="@episode" data-type="number"/>
      </xsl:apply-templates>      
    </collection>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="item">
    <item id="{position()}">
      <xsl:apply-templates select="@*[not(name()='id')]|node()"/>
    </item>
  </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

produces this output:

<collection type="GCTVepisodes" items="101" version="1.6.1">
   <information>
      <maxId>101</maxId>
   </information>
   <item id="1" name="some name" series="Alpha" season="1" episode="1">
      <synopsis>Blah blah blah...</synopsis>
    ...
  </item>
   <item id="2" name="some name" series="Alpha" season="2" episode="1">
      <synopsis>Blah blah blah...</synopsis>
    ...
  </item>
   <item id="3" name="The Vice President Doesn't Say Anything about the Possibility of      Him Being the Main Character" series="Baccano" season="1" episode="1">
      <synopsis>It's 1931 and...</synopsis>
    ...
  </item>
   <item id="4" name="The Vice President Doesn't Say Anything about the Possibility of      Him Being the Main Character" series="Baccano" season="1" episode="2">
      <synopsis>Blah blah blah...</synopsis>
    ...
  </item>
</collection>

with the input from therealmarv's answer it produces:

<collection type="GCTVepisodes" items="5" version="1.6.1">
   <information>
      <maxId>5</maxId>
   </information>
   <item id="1" name="The Vice President Doesn't Say Anything about the Possibility of      Him Being the Main Character" series="Baccano" season="1" episode="1"/>
   <item id="2" name="blabla2" series="Baccano" season="1" episode="2"/>
   <item id="3" name="abc" series="Baccano" season="2" episode="1"/>
   <item id="4" name="first of c" series="c" season="1" episode="1"/>
   <item id="5" name="blabla" series="c" season="1" episode="2"/>
</collection>
share|improve this answer
    
ah looks good. Never used sort in apply-templates. Seems I can learn some new things here in stackoverflow :-) – therealmarv Jul 8 '11 at 22:59
    
Excellent. I try to avoid the "for-each" loops whenever possible. It seems like I get in the wrong mind set when I start looping in XSLT. ;-) – Daniel Haley Jul 8 '11 at 23:07
    
This really helped me out, thanks a lot! :) – Deep-B Jul 9 '11 at 19:09
    
@DevNull just to note that this transform will omit any eventual children element of item (e.g. synopsis). – Emiliano Poggi Jul 9 '11 at 21:52
1  
If you downvote, please let me know the reason so I can improve/correct my answer. – Daniel Haley May 27 '15 at 16:52

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