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I am now facing a problem of summing up a numeric column with a sliding window defined by values in another column.

(1) My data are tab-delimited, with two numeric columns:

1000 12
2000 10
3000 9
5000 3
9000 5
10000 90
30000 20
31000 32
39000 33
40000 28

(2) I want to sum up 2nd column with a window defined by 1st column, window size is (1st column + 3000). This means I need to add the 3rd column (3rd column = sum(all values of the 2nd columns in rows of 1st column to 1st cloumn+3000)).

It looks like this:

1000 12 12+10+9
2000 10 10+9+3
3000 9 9
5000 3 3
9000 5 5+90
10000 90 90
30000 20 20+32
31000 32 32
39000 33 33
40000 28

(3) I am new for programming. I tried awk, but I am failed.

I do not know how to control the window for the 1st column

awk '(i = 1; i <= NR; i++) { sum[i]+=$2 } END {print $1,$2,sum}' mydata

Could anyone give me any advice/directions on the problem? Thanks in advance.

Best,

share|improve this question
    
I only see one row in your sample data. Perhaps you could reformat it such that your sample data fits your question. Use the code brackets to force your formatting. –  DavidO Jul 8 '11 at 22:42
    
DavidO, sorry. I do not know what is code brackets. I tried but failed. There are two column (fields) in my data. –  jianfeng.mao Jul 8 '11 at 22:55
    
Thanks a lot for your help on editing the post, DavidO. –  jianfeng.mao Jul 8 '11 at 23:04
    
You're welcome. I still don't understand how you're defining your windows. Perhaps you could add an update that clarifies. What does 1st column plus 3000 mean? Is your second table (posted after "It looks like this:" your desired output? It doesn't seem to have any relationship to the definition. –  DavidO Jul 8 '11 at 23:26
2  
@DavidO, let F[1] mean first column row 1, and S[1] mean second column row 1. He wants to calculate the sum of S[A..B] where F[B+1] is the first value that is greater than F[A] + 3000. So the first row is 12+10+9 because 1000 + 3000 = 4000 and 5000 is the first value greater than 4000. –  cjm Jul 9 '11 at 3:22
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is not something that really any of the languages are really adept at, and in fact what you're asking is a reasonably challenging programming task, especially for a novice.

Nonetheless, here's an awk script for you:

BEGIN {
    window = 3000;
}

function push(line, sum,   n) {
    n = length(lines);
    lines[n] = line;
    sums[n] = sum;
}

function pop(  n, i) {
    n = length(lines);

    if (n > 1) {
        for(i = 0; i < n - 1; i++) {
            lines[i] = lines[i + 1];
            sums[i] = sums[i + 1];
        }
    }
    if (n > 0) {
        delete lines[n - 1];
        delete sums[n - 1];
    }
}

{
    cur_line = $1;
    value = $2;
    n = length(lines);
    pops = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        if (lines[i] + window < cur_line) {
            print "Sum for " lines[i] " = " sums[i];
            pops++;
         }
    }
    for (i = 0; i < pops; i++) {
        pop();
    }
    push(cur_line, 0);
    n = length(lines);
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        sums[i] = sums[i] + value;
    }
}

END {
    n = length(lines);
    for (i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        if (lines[i] < cur_line + window) {
            print "Sum for " lines[i] " = " sums[i];
         }
    }
}

And here's a run on your sample data:

Sum for 1000 = 31
Sum for 2000 = 22
Sum for 3000 = 12
Sum for 5000 = 3
Sum for 9000 = 95
Sum for 10000 = 90
Sum for 30000 = 52
Sum for 31000 = 32
Sum for 39000 = 61
Sum for 40000 = 28
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Will. I really like awk scripts. I am facing problem when I tried to test it. I saved your scripts in a file "slid_awk.awk". And using a line of command: awk '{print $2,$3}' test | awk -f slid_awk.awk. The error returned are: awk: slid_awk.awk:7: (FILENAME=- FNR=1) fatal: attempt to use scalar `lines' as array –  jianfeng.mao Jul 9 '11 at 9:10
    
I would check you version of the code. What it is saying is that, somehow, the variable "lines" was assigned a normal value (a string, or a number) rather than as an array. This could easily happen if there's a typo that confuses "lines" with the "line" variable. –  Will Hartung Jul 9 '11 at 14:58
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I am not very good with awk, but here is something I hacked together in perl, which should also run if you are on a unix system. Assuming you save it as a file called window.pl:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;

# Usage: window.pl < [filepath or text stream]
# Example: window.pl < window.txt

my $window = 3000;
my @lines = <STDIN>;
my $i = 0;
my $last_line = $#lines;

# Start reading each line
while ($i<= $last_line)
{
    my $current_line = $lines[$i];
    my ($col1, $col2) = ( $current_line =~ /(\d+)\s+(\d+)/ );
    my $ubound = $col1 + $window;
    my @sums = $col2;
    my $lookahead = $i + 1;

    # Start looking at subsequent lines within the window
    while ($lookahead <= $last_line)
    {
        my $next_line = $lines[$lookahead];
        my ($c1, $c2) = ( $next_line =~ /(\d+)\s+(\d+)/ );
        if ($c1 <= $ubound)
        {
            push @sums, $c2;
            ++$lookahead;
        }
        else
        {
            last;
        }
    }

    my $output;
    if ( $#sums > 0 )
    {
        my $sum = join "+", @sums;
        $output = "$col1 $sum\n";
    }
    else
    {
        $output = "$col1 $col2\n";
    }
    print $output;
    ++$i;
}

Output:

1000 12+10+9
2000 10+9+3
3000 9+3
5000 3
9000 5+90
10000 90
30000 20+32
31000 32
39000 33+28
40000 28

This only works if the input file is small enough to read into memory, but maybe this will help you anyways.

Good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Dan, I just want to learn perl, an attractive tools. –  jianfeng.mao Jul 9 '11 at 9:12
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Here is a Perl solution:

use warnings;
use strict;

my (%data, @ids);
while (<DATA>) { # read in the data
    /^(\d+)\s+(\d+)$/ or die "bad input: $_";
    push @ids, $1;
    $data{$1} = [$2]
}
for (0 .. $#ids) { # slide window over data
    my ($i, $id) = ($_ + 1, $ids[$_]);

    push @{$data{$id}}, $data{ $ids[$i++] }[0]
        while $i < @ids and $ids[$i] <= $id + 3000;
}

$" = '+';                                                               #"
print "$_: @{$data{$_}}\n" for @ids;

__DATA__
1000 12
2000 10
3000 9
5000 3
9000 5
10000 90
30000 20
31000 32
39000 33
40000 28

Which prints:

1000: 12+10+9
2000: 10+9+3
3000: 9+3
5000: 3
9000: 5+90
10000: 90
30000: 20+32
31000: 32
39000: 33+28
40000: 28
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Eric, I witnessed such a good perl solution. –  jianfeng.mao Jul 9 '11 at 9:13
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Here's a slightly more compact version of a solution:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

use constant WIN_SIZE => 3000;

my @pending;

while (<>) {
    my ($pos, $val) = split;

    # Store line info, sum, and when to stop summing
    push @pending, { pos   => $pos,
                     val   => $val,
                     limit => $pos + WIN_SIZE,
                     sum   => 0 };

    show($_)   for grep { $_->{limit} <  $pos } @pending; # Show items beyond window

    @pending =     grep { $_->{limit} >= $pos } @pending; # Keep items still in window

    $_->{sum} += $val for @pending;                       # And continue their sums
}

# and don't forget those items left within the window when the data ran out
show($_) for @pending;

sub show {
    my $pending = shift;
    print join("\t", $pending->{pos}, $pending->{val}, $pending->{sum}), "\n";
}

Just drop it in a script and give you datafile on the same line, e.g.:

$ perl script.pl mydata
1000    12  31
2000    10  22
3000    9   12
5000    3   3
9000    5   95
10000   90  90
30000   20  52
31000   32  32
39000   33  61
40000   28  28
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Mark. Your have given me a good guide of perl. –  jianfeng.mao Jul 9 '11 at 9:12
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