Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a system where current object is operated by other contained objects, when reference to current object is passed, it appears that the link goes on and on....without any end ( For the code below, Car->myCurrentComponent->myCar_Brake->myCurrentComponent->myCar_Brake->myCurrentComponent ....).

ICar and Car->myCurrentComponent->myCar_Brake refer to same address, point to same objects. It's like Car contains Brake which refers to Car.

In fact, Car is the only object, myCar_Brake and myCar_Speed just refer(point) to it.Is this kind of use of reference and pointer normal? Are there any potential problem with this approach?

Sample Code

class Brake
class C

class   Car
{

public:

Car();
// Objects of type B and C.
Brake*  myBrake;
Speed*  mySpeed;

// Current component under action.

Component*  myCurrentComponent;

}
/******************************/
// Constructor

Car::Car()
{
myBrake = new Brake(*this);
mySpeed = new Speed(*this);

myCurrentComponent = myBrake;
}

/******************************/
class   Brake: public   Component
{

public:

Brake(Car&);
// Needs to operate on A.
Car*    myCar_Brake;

}

// Constructor
Brake::Brake(Car&)
{
myCar_Brake = Car;
}

/******************************/
class Speed
{

public:

Speed(Car&);

// Needs to operate on A.
Car*    myCar_Speed;

}

// Constructor
Speed::Speed(Car&)
{
myCar_Speed = Car;
}

/****************************/
share|improve this question
    
Unless Brake and speed are polymorphic then there is no need for pointers. Use objects instead. –  Loki Astari Jul 8 '11 at 22:55
    
Sorry.....Not shown, But as you pointed out, They are polymorphic. –  First Jul 9 '11 at 0:18

2 Answers 2

There's no fundamental problem with having circular references in your object graph, so long as you understand that and don't try to traverse your object graph without keeping track of which objects you've encountered. To specifically answer your question, having circular references between objects is relatively common; it's the way a doubly-linked list works, for example.

share|improve this answer
    
True, but it should be noted that a doubly linked list (or a single one for that matter) is a very unusual structure when modeling real life object per the example from OP. –  Captain Giraffe Jul 8 '11 at 22:12
    
@CaptainGiraffe: it's all dependent upon the modeling. A common real-world example: a Person has Relatives; among those Relatives are their Parents and their Children. –  Paul Sonier Jul 8 '11 at 22:18
    
That would be the canonical counterexample. Still I would argue that it is uncommon for that design to be necessary. –  Captain Giraffe Jul 8 '11 at 22:22
    
@CaptainGiraffe: How can brake and speed operate on instance of Car if not done this way? What is your way of achieving this? Thanks. –  First Jul 9 '11 at 0:21
    
@First The Brake brakes the Car and as a consequence impacts the speed (via the cars response. Maybe the brakes activates an air-brake triggered by lots of parameters. Bugatti Veyron? :-) ). So I would probably go with some event model or similar message passing mechanism. –  Captain Giraffe Jul 10 '11 at 8:48

Although, as Paul mentions, there is no problem with having circular references, the above code example is totally missing encapsulation and is not memory leak safe.

Does it make sense to allow something like this?

Speed::Speed(Car& value)
{
  myCar_Speed = value;
  // WTF code below
  value->myCurrentComponent->myCar_Brake = NULL;
}

Also,

Car::Car()
{
  myBrake = new Brake(*this);
  mySpeed = new Speed(*this);
  //if Speed::Speed(Car&) throws an exception, memory allocated for myBrake will leak
  myCurrentComponent = myBrake;
}

Never use raw pointers without some kind of a resource manager.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.