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I just came across this piece of code

while 1:
    line = data.readline()
    if not line:
        break
    #...

and thought, there must be a better way to do this, than using an infinite loop with break.

So I tried:

while line = data.readline():
    #...

and, obviously, got an error.

Is there any way to avoid using a break in that situation?

Edit:

Ideally, you'd want to avoid saying readline twice... IMHO, repeating is even worse than just a break, especially if the statement is complex.

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2  
While this is a good question and I think the for line in data solution is a good fit for this specific problem, I don't think there's anything wrong with the while True: ... break idiom. Don't be afraid of it. :-) –  Kirk Strauser Jul 8 '11 at 22:53
1  
These answers provide alternatives to assignment in the conditional of the while-loop, but really don't answer the question: is there a way to do assignment in the while-loop? I'm running into this same problem, trying to do while (character = string[i]): I know that a for-loop is a better way to iterate over a string, but my conditional is actually much more complex than this, and I want to do this assignment as the right-hand side of an "or" within the conditional. –  user2760926 Sep 9 '13 at 9:30
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9 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

If you aren't doing anything fancier with data, like reading more lines later on, there's always:

for line in data:
    ... do stuff ...
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I was trying to play Stump The Sushi Eater by thinking of a type of object data might be that would support .readline() but not __iter__(). I'm drawing a blank. Do you know of any offhand? –  Kirk Strauser Jul 8 '11 at 22:32
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According to the FAQ from Python's documentation, iterating over the input with for construct or running an infinite while True loop and using break statement to terminate it, are preferred and idiomatic ways of iteration.

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This isn't much better, but this is the way I usually do it. Python doesn't return the value upon variable assignment like other languages (e.g., Java).

line = data.readline()
while line:
    # ... do stuff ... 
    line = data.readline()
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3  
I'm not a big fan of that, especially if ... do stuff ... is sizable as it requires you to keep the flow of the entire loop in mind as you hack around on it. For example, if you add something like if line.startswith('foo'): continue later without realizing that line is only updated at the very end, then you've accidentally created an infinite loop. –  Kirk Strauser Jul 8 '11 at 22:22
    
@Kirk - In part, I agree ,but the alternatives aren't much better. Ideally, the class you're using implements a generator and you can just use a for loop, but there are certain cases where you need a while loop ( e.g., 'while cur_time>expected_time:'). I don't know if the OPs post is much better, but I suppose its a matter of opinion :) –  dfb Jul 8 '11 at 22:33
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Try this one, works for files opened with open('filename')

for line in iter(data.readline, b''):
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If data is a file, as stated in other answers, using for line in file will work fine. If data is not a file, and a random data reading object, then you should implement it as an iterator, implementing __iter__ and next methods.

The next method should to the reading, check if there is more data, and if not, raise StopIteration. If you do this, you can continue using the for line in data idiom.

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If data has a function that returns an iterator instead of readline (say data.iterate), you could simply do:

for line in data.iterate():
    #...
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1  
Don't do that unless you know data is tiny (and really not even then) as .readlines() slurps the entire contents into RAM, but it doesn't really buy you anything in return. –  Kirk Strauser Jul 8 '11 at 22:30
    
It should work fine if the function returns an iterator instead of the entire list, correct? –  TorelTwiddler Jul 8 '11 at 22:38
    
Yes, but I haven't seen .readlines() implemented that way. The docs for file.readlines() say that it will "[r]ead until EOF using readline() and return a list containing the lines thus read." –  Kirk Strauser Jul 8 '11 at 22:49
    
I'll edit my answer to be less specific, then, thanks. =) –  TorelTwiddler Jul 8 '11 at 22:51
    
I like that answer better. :-) However, the usual name for iterate is __iter__, and then you can re-write the loop as for line in data. –  Kirk Strauser Jul 8 '11 at 22:55
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Like,

for line in data:
    # ...

? It large depends on the semantics of the data object's readline semantics. If data is a file object, that'll work.

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for line in data:
    ... process line somehow....

Will iterate over each line in the file, rather than using a while. It is a much more common idiom for the task of reading a file in my experience (in Python).

In fact, data does not have to be a file but merely provide an iterator.

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You could do:

line = 1
while line:
    line = data.readline()
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