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In the program below I've a typedef map. What I want to do is to implement a hash table. I'm trying to use unordered_map since I heard that is the efficient as it takes O(1) time. I use my typedef map everywhere in my main program (another program that I'm working on) so I don't want to change that. I want to implement hash table in one of the functions and I'm trying to figure out how to insert the contents of my map into the hash table and search for the key later. I've inserted a comment in two places where I'm having trouble. Please help.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>
#include <set>
#include <map>
#include <unordered_map>

using namespace std;

typedef vector<int> v_t;
typedef set<int> s_t;
typedef map<s_t, v_t> m_t;
typedef m_t::iterator m_it;
typedef std::unordered_map<s_t, v_t> Mymap;

int main(){
    m_t sample;
    for (int i = 0; i < 100; i = i+2) {
        v_t v;
        for(int k = 100 ; k<=105 ; ++k)
            v.push_back(k);
        s_t k;
        k.insert(i);
        sample.insert(sample.end(), make_pair(k, v));
    }

    //---------Debug--------------------
    for( m_it it(sample.begin()) ; it!=sample.end(); ++it) {
        cout << "Key: ";
        copy(it->first.begin(), it->first.end(), ostream_iterator<int>(cout, " "));
        cout << " => Value: ";
        copy (it->second.begin(),it->second.end(),ostream_iterator<double>(cout," "));
        cout << endl;
    }
    //---------------------------------

    Mymap c1;

    for( m_it it(sample.begin()) ; it!=sample.end(); ++it) {
        c1.insert(Mymap::value_type(it->first,it->second));   // how to do this ?
    }
    s_t s;
    s.insert(72);
    if(c1.find(s)!=c1.end())                                // does this work ?
        cout << "Success" << endl;
    return 0;
}

I appreciate any help or comments.

After reading Jason's comments I understand why i cannot use a std::set as a key in unordered_map so I tried to use std::string as a key but the find function won't work. Could you please help me.

Mymap c1;

for( m_it it(sample.begin()) ; it!=sample.end(); ++it) {
    v_t v1;
    std::string key;
    key.insert(key.begin(),it->first.begin(),it->first.end()); 
    copy(it->second.begin(), it->second.end(),std::back_inserter(v1));
    c1.insert(Mymap::value_type(std::make_pair(key,v1)));
}

string s = "72";
if((c1.find(s) != c1.end()) == true) 
    cout << "Success" << endl;
return 0;
share|improve this question
1  
Make sure you're compiling with C++0x support ... that may require you to set the proper flag with gcc, such as gcc -std=c++0x or gcc -std=gnu++0x ... you'll also need to re-define you key-values, as you can't directly convert an int to a string without using a helper function. – Jason Jul 9 '11 at 3:17
    
@Jason : Sure. Thanks – Sunil Jul 9 '11 at 3:22
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The basic element you're missing to make this work is to define a hashing function for your std::set that you're using as the key. The STL already defines equality and lexicographical ordering for a std::set, so you can use it as the key-value in a std::map as-is without any problems. It does not define a hash function though, so that is something you're going to have to-do by overloading std::hash. This is fairly straight-forward, and can be done by defining the following function:

namespace std
{
    template<>
    struct hash<std::set<int> > : public std::unary_function<std::set<int>, size_t>
    {
        size_t operator()(const std::set<int>& my_set) const
        {
           //insert hash algorithm that returns integral type
        }
    };
}

The above functor object would return an integral type of size_t, and would take a std::set as the argument. You'll have to define it inside of namespace std so that std::unordered_map will recognize it. An "easy" algorithm could be simply summing the elements since you have a set of type int. There are more complex algorithms out there that would reduce the number of collisions such a simple algorithm would create at the expense of hashing time. Once you have this defined though, you shouldn't have any problems inserting your std::set key-values into an unordered_map, as well as creating new key-values and finding them in the hash table.

You can see an example of your source-code working at: http://ideone.com/DZ5jm

EDIT: Jason's code placed here for reference:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>
#include <set>
#include <map>
#include <unordered_map>

using namespace std;

namespace std
{
        template<>
        struct hash<set<int> > : public unary_function<set<int>, size_t>
        {
            size_t operator()(const std::set<int>& my_set) const
            {
               set<int>::iterator iter = my_set.begin();
               int total = 0;

               for (; iter != my_set.end(); iter++)
               {
                   total += *iter;
               }

               return total;
            }
        };
}



typedef vector<int> v_t;
typedef set<int> s_t;
typedef map<s_t, v_t> m_t;
typedef m_t::iterator m_it;
typedef std::unordered_map<s_t, v_t> Mymap;

int main(){

m_t sample;
for (int i = 0; i < 100; i = i+2) {
        v_t v;
        for(int k = 100 ; k<=105 ; ++k)
           v.push_back(k);
        s_t k;
        k.insert(i);
        sample.insert(sample.end(), make_pair(k, v));
    }

//---------Debug--------------------
for( m_it it(sample.begin()) ; it!=sample.end(); ++it) {
   cout << "Key: ";
   copy(it->first.begin(), it->first.end(), ostream_iterator<int>(cout, " "));
   cout << " => Value: ";
   copy (it->second.begin(),it->second.end(),ostream_iterator<double>(cout," "));
   cout << endl;
   }
//---------------------------------

Mymap c1;

for( m_it it(sample.begin()) ; it!=sample.end(); ++it) {
   c1.insert(Mymap::value_type(it->first,it->second));   // how to do this ?
   }
s_t s;
s.insert(72);
if(c1.find(s)!=c1.end())                                // does this work ?
   cout << "Success" << endl;
return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I guess I made a mistake by telling it is ordered. It is not and I'll edit it. But I could still use sample.find(s); to find a value in the map where s is a std::set as defined in the program. Can i do the same with unordered_map ? – Sunil Jul 9 '11 at 1:30
    
Just as a note: You can define a strict (weak) ordering on a set of strictly (weakly) ordered elements: set1 < set2 if *set1.begin() < *set2.begin(). If the first (i.e. smallest) elements are equal you can iterate. If all elements are equal the containers are equal if they are of equal length, otherwise the container with the least elements is smaller. This is the canonical ordering that you would apply to numbers (from right to left, though). – bitmask Jul 9 '11 at 1:41
    
You can do the same, but again, if you stored the key-values as pointers to your sets, you are not going to have to worry about the above rules of equality for your key-values ... the fact that the pointers to two different sets are not going to be equal (can't be equal), gives you a nice way to differentiate sets. Furthermore pointers are easy to hash, and easy to sort, so they make great key-values for both std::map and std::unordered_map. For protection against memory leaks you can store them inside a std::shared_ptr. – Jason Jul 9 '11 at 1:41
    
@bitmask ... yes, very true ... the same can be done for lexigraphically ordering a string. I wasn't trying to say it can't be done, but that it's just cumbersome ... any quick technique won't work. Defining a lexigraphical order can be a time-consuming process, and using pointers can circumvent this issue altogether. – Jason Jul 9 '11 at 1:45
    
It would be helpful for me to understand better if you could give an example or edit my code. I'd really appreciate that. – Sunil Jul 9 '11 at 1:46

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