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For silly reasons I'll not go into here, I need the commented out line to work and the line above it it to not work:

template<uint _N, typename... _Args>
struct PartialTuple;

template<uint _N, typename _Arg, typename... _Args>
struct PartialTuple<_N, _Arg, _Args...>: PartialTuple<_N-1, _Args...> {};

template<typename _Arg, typename... _Args>
struct PartialTuple<0, _Arg, _Args...>
{
    typedef std::tuple<_Arg, _Args...> type;
};

int main()
{
    // I want this to not work...
    PartialTuple<1, std::string, std::string, int, int>::type A{"test", 5, 1};

    // I want this to work...
    //PartialTuple<1, std::string, std::string, int, int>::type B{"test", "test", 5};
}

I tried swapping _Arg with _Args..., but that won't compile (at least in GCC 4.6):

error: parameter pack argument ‘_Args ...’ must be at the end of the template argument list

How can I pull items off from the tail instead of from the head?

share|improve this question
    
I imagine you could write a veriadic templates constructor, and write an Expand helper object that tacks on default constructed objects if the size is too low, then forward the whole shebang to another constructor that just initializes everything like normal. – Dennis Zickefoose Jul 9 '11 at 3:53
4  
Quick remark: identifiers starting with _[A-Z] are reserved in all scopes, your code is not standard compliant. – Matthieu M. Jul 9 '11 at 10:04
    
Good to know, I'll change it. I got that habit from looking at STL headers, which is probably a bad idea. – Sydius Jul 9 '11 at 18:59
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here's a solution: Instead of truncating N from the back, I just truncate sizeof...(Args) - N from the front:

#include <tuple>

/* Concatenator helper */

template <typename T, typename Tuple> struct cat;
template <typename T, typename ...Args>
struct cat<T, std::tuple<Args...>>
{
  typedef typename std::tuple<T, Args...> value;
};


/* Head-of-tuple */

template <unsigned int, typename...> struct tuple_head;

// Base case. Need to specialize twice, once for one and once for variadic types
template <typename ...Args>
struct tuple_head<0, Args...>
{
  typedef std::tuple<> value;
};
template <typename T>
struct tuple_head<0, T>
{
  typedef std::tuple<> value;
};

// Recursion step
template <unsigned int N, typename T, typename ...Args>
struct tuple_head<N, T, Args...>
{
  typedef typename cat<T, typename tuple_head<N - 1, Args...>::value>::value value;
};


/* User interface */

template <unsigned int N, typename ...Args>
struct PartialTuple
{
  typedef typename tuple_head<sizeof...(Args) - N, Args...>::value type;
};


/* Usage */

#include <string>
int main()
{
  // I want this to not work...
  //PartialTuple<1, std::string, std::string, int, int>::type A{"test", 5, 1};

  // I want this to work...
  PartialTuple<1, std::string, std::string, int, int>::type B("test", "test", 5);
  PartialTuple<0, std::string, std::string, int, int>::type C("test", "test", 5, 6);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Looks like we had the same idea! +1 :) – Vitus Jul 9 '11 at 15:39
    
When you say it like that, it seems obvious. :-) – Sydius Jul 9 '11 at 19:08

I've been playing with it all night and finally got something to work (changed my casing to match the STL):

template<uint _N, typename... _All>
struct reverse_tuple_outer
{
    template<typename _Head, typename... _Tail>
    struct reverse_tuple_inner: reverse_tuple_outer<_N-1, _Head, _All...>::template reverse_tuple_inner<_Tail...> { };
};

template<typename... _All>
struct reverse_tuple_outer<0, _All...>
{
    template<typename... _Tail>
    struct reverse_tuple_inner {
        typedef std::tuple<_All...> type;
    };
};

template<typename... _Args>
struct reverse_tuple
{
    typedef typename reverse_tuple_outer<sizeof...(_Args)>::template reverse_tuple_inner<_Args...>::type type;
};

template<typename... _Args>
struct strip_and_reverse_tuple;

template<typename... _Args>
struct strip_and_reverse_tuple<std::tuple<_Args...>>
{
    typedef typename reverse_tuple<_Args...>::type type;
};

template<uint _N, typename... _Args>
struct partial_tuple
{
    typedef typename strip_and_reverse_tuple<typename reverse_tuple_outer<sizeof...(_Args)-_N>::template reverse_tuple_inner<_Args...>::type>::type type;
};

int main()
{
    //partial_tuple<1, std::string, std::string, int, int>::type A{"test", 5, 1};
    partial_tuple<1, std::string, std::string, int, int>::type B{"test", "test", 5};
}

As an added bonus, I also have reverse_tuple, should I ever need it.

share|improve this answer
2  
You shouldn't "match the STL" with casing, it is reserved for the implementation. – Xeo Jul 9 '11 at 14:39
    
Oh, that's a good point. I'll change it back in my code, then. :-) – Sydius Jul 9 '11 at 18:57

I've made my code work a little bit like lists in Haskell - because, well, TMP is purely functional language inside C++.

add_to_pack is equivalent to Haskell's list constructor (:). drop_from_end is implemented as (in Haskell notation) \x list -> take (length list - x) list, where take n just takes first n elements of the list.

I suppose you could use std::tuple directly instead of pack, but I liked this solution better, because it doesn't misuse tuple as template parameter pack holder. :)

Here's the code:

#include <tuple>
#include <type_traits> // for std::conditional


template <typename... Pack>
struct pack
{ };


template <typename, typename>
struct add_to_pack;

template <typename A, typename... R>
struct add_to_pack<A, pack<R...>>
{
  typedef pack<A, R...> type;
};


template <typename>
struct convert_to_tuple;

template <typename... A>
struct convert_to_tuple<pack<A...>>
{
  typedef std::tuple<A...> type;
};


template <int, typename...>
struct take;

template <int N>
struct take<N>
{
  typedef pack<> type;
};

template <int N, typename Head, typename... Tail>
struct take<N, Head, Tail...>
{
  typedef
    typename std::conditional<
      (N > 0),
      typename add_to_pack<
        Head,
        typename take<
          N - 1,
          Tail...
        >::type
      >::type,
      pack<>
    >::type type;
};  


template <int N, typename... A>
struct drop_from_end
{
  // Add these asserts if needed.
  //static_assert(N >= 0,
  //  "Cannot drop negative number of elements!");

  //static_assert(N <= static_cast<int>(sizeof...(A)),
  //  "Cannot drop more elements than size of pack!")

  typedef
    typename convert_to_tuple<
      typename take<
        static_cast<int>(sizeof...(A)) - N,
        A...
      >::type
    >::type type;
};


int main()
{
  drop_from_end<2, const char*, double, int, int>::type b{"pi", 3.1415};
}

And here's the code at work: via ideone.com.


The take struct is more or less equivalent to following Haskell code:

take n []     = []
take n (x:xs)
  | n > 0     = x : take (n - 1) xs
  | otherwise = []
share|improve this answer
    
I like your idea of using pack. I hadn't made the connection between TMP and functional programming, possibly because I've never spent all that much time with a purely functional language. Interesting insight. – Sydius Jul 9 '11 at 19:04

I have done something similar using Boost.MPL and Boost.Fusion: compute the type sequence using the MPL facilities such as push_back, then convert it to a fusion::vector with fusion::as_vector and MPL adaptors. I already had a helper to convert a fusion::vector to std::tuple though.

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