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I wrote the following code to read the content of a file:

#include <ifstream>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(){
    char file_name[30] = "data.txt";
    // Create an ifstream to read the file.
    ifstream People_in(file_name);
      while (1) {
        if (People_in.eof())
            break;
        People_in >> first_name >> last_name >> age;
        cout << endl << "First Name: " << first_name;
        cout << endl << "Last Name:  " << last_name;
        cout << endl << "Enter Age:  " << age;
        cout << endl;

      }
      People_in.close();
      return 0;
  }

data.txt content:

FirstName1
LastName1
1
FirstName2
LastName2
2
FirstName3
LastName3
3

The output I expected:

First Name: FirstName1
Last Name: LastName1
Age: 1

First Name: FirstName2
Last Name: LastName2
Age: 2

First Name: FirstName3
Last Name: LastName3
Age: 3

But the output is:

First Name: FirstName1
Last Name: LastName1
Age: 1

First Name: FirstName2
Last Name: LastName2
Age: 2

First Name: FirstName3
Last Name: LastName3
Age: 3

First Name: FirstName3
Last Name: LastName3
Age: 3

I can't figure out why? PeopleIn is supposed to reach eof when it read through all the data. But how can it repeat the last 3 line ??

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2  
I think you probably have an extra character - like a newline - at the end of your input file. –  sje397 Jul 9 '11 at 4:32
1  
EOF is not set until you read PAST the end of file. When you read the last character for person 3. EOF is not set. Thus it passes your test and does not break out of the loop. The first attempt to read (person 4) fails but you have no test after the read and you print out an extra undefined person. So you can move the test to after the read. Or write the loop correctly like suggested by 'Mihran' below. –  Loki Astari Jul 9 '11 at 5:22
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is because after last step the eof is not reached (there is character after 3 in your file).

Try this:

while (People_in >> first_name >> last_name >> age)
{
    cout << endl << "First Name: " << first_name;
    cout << endl << "Last Name:  " << last_name;
    cout << endl << "Enter Age:  " << age;
    cout << endl;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Why not: while (People_in >> first_name >> last_name >> age) If any read fails do you want the loop to be entered? –  Loki Astari Jul 9 '11 at 5:18
    
@Martin Yes we, maybe, will finish loop when one of inputs failed. –  Mihran Hovsepyan Jul 9 '11 at 6:20
    
This work really well =)) –  Minh Hieu Jul 9 '11 at 7:52
    
Yes @Hieusun2011 this work. But it will be good if you start to accept answers. I see that you have no accepted answer. –  Mihran Hovsepyan Jul 9 '11 at 17:17
    
=)) I've forgot to select, sorry –  Minh Hieu Jul 10 '11 at 12:25
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Check that there is no extra new lines at the end of file. It seems there is extra set of new lines (\n), and it is causing eof method to fail.

share|improve this answer
    
No. EOF is not set until you read past it. Reading person three will succeed and read up to the end of file without setting the EOF flag. The next attempt to read that reads past the EOF will fail and set the EOF flag. –  Loki Astari Jul 9 '11 at 5:25
    
Thatt's right, i modified the input without the (\n) at the end and the code works. thanks –  Minh Hieu Jul 9 '11 at 7:56
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Even without the newline at the end of the file, the code will still print extra input. Instead, after you read in the first name, last name in age, try:

People_in >> first_name >> last_name >> age;
if (first_name.length() == 0)
    break;
....
share|improve this answer
    
That will work. Or you can test the stream is still good after the read, –  Loki Astari Jul 9 '11 at 5:27
    
Unfortunately, there isn't a decent solution to the problem posed. What I mean by "decent" is that there has to be extra logic to check when the end of the file is reached, as opposed to relying purely on what is inside the while(...) –  Chris Jul 9 '11 at 5:31
    
@Martin I don't think testing whether or not the stream is good after the read will work. If you are suggesting replacing my "if (first_name.length() == 0) break;" with "if (People_in.eof()) break;" that will not work. In the case that the very LAST byte in the file is the '3' and not a '\n' your suggestion will only print the first two sets of data. –  Chris Jul 9 '11 at 5:34
    
Right, this solution works but not in all case because what if you want to saparate each field with a '\n' =)) –  Minh Hieu Jul 9 '11 at 7:54
    
@Chris. You are wrong. This is exactly what I am suggesting. Even if the last byte is not a '\n' then my method will work perfectly. The last good read will read upto but not past the EOF. Thus the EOF flag is not set. It is the first read after all the bytes have been read that sets the EOF flag. So your code could be very easily replaced with if (People_in) (Note: do not add eof() as there are other states that are also bad). In fact the correct solution is to put this as part of the while loop: while(People_in >> first_name >> last_name >> age) –  Loki Astari Jul 9 '11 at 18:00
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try it like this

  while (People_in) {
//... 
}

remove the if break part

share|improve this answer
    
The trouble with that is the it still enters the loop. When you read person 4 the reads will fail and you need to test the stream is OK after the read has been done. –  Loki Astari Jul 9 '11 at 5:26
    
This no work :) –  Minh Hieu Jul 9 '11 at 7:55
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