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The code below correctly finds the local maximum of an array, but it fails to find the local minimum. I have done web searches to find best methods for finding minima, and I think I am using the correct method below, based on those searches. But there is some bug in the code below that I am still not seeing, after going over each line many times over the course of a few days.

The variables startX and endX define the user-selected window in which the code must find the local min/max. If you manipulate the values for startX and endX, you will see that the code below always outputs the minimum as the first index of the selected window, which indicates that it is not iterating through the indices in the window to search for the minimum.

Can anyone find the bug and show me how to fix the code below to find the local minimum?

class LocalMinMax {
static double[] pts;
static int visiblePoints=5000;
static int startX = 200;
static int endX = 700;

public static void main (String[] args) {
    int lastX2 = 0;
    int maxWidth = 800;
    double hstep = (double) maxWidth / visiblePoints;
    int maxHeight = 400;
    pts = new double[visiblePoints];
    double max = Double.NEGATIVE_INFINITY;
    double min = Double.POSITIVE_INFINITY;
    int minIndex = -1;
    int maxIndex = -1;
    for (int i = 0; i < visiblePoints; i++){
        pts[i] = (double) ((((Math.sin(.009*i))*(Math.cos(.004*i))) * (maxHeight/3) * .95) + (maxHeight/2));
        int x2 = (int) (i * hstep);
        if(x2>=startX){
            int sectionStartIndex = i;
            int sectionEndIndex = (int)(endX/hstep);
                for(int k=sectionStartIndex;k<sectionEndIndex;k++){
                    if(min>pts[k]){
                        min = pts[k];
                        minIndex = x2;
                        System.out.println("minIndex, min, pts["+k+"]: , x2 are: "+minIndex+", "+min+", "+pts[k]+", "+x2);
                    }
                    if(max<pts[k]){
                        max = pts[k];
                        maxIndex = x2;
                    }}}
        if(lastX2!=x2){
            lastX2=x2;
            if(x2==startX){
                int width = endX - startX;
                System.out.println("WINDOW: width, startX, endX are: "+width+", "+startX+", "+endX);
                }}}
    int maxVal = (int)max;
    int minVal = (int)min;
    System.out.println("LOCAL MAX: maxIndex, maxVal are: "+maxIndex+", "+maxVal);
    System.out.println("LOCAL MIN: minIndex, minVal are: "+minIndex+", "+minVal);
    }}
share|improve this question
    
This sounds like a do-my-homework kind of question... Have you considered googling finding maximum element in an array in java? You'll get amazing results. –  chahuistle Jul 9 '11 at 9:39
    
@chahuistle, thank you for the key word suggestions. Yes, I know how to find a max/min in java. And yes, I have been doing web searches. The confusion is with regards to integrating it with the paintComponent() code. If you look at my code, you will see that I use correct methods for finding min/max, and that I find the global min/max correctly. Also, one of the methods in my code that does not work for finding the local min comes straight from methods found in web searches. But yes, I will also look at search results from the key words that you suggested. Thank you. –  CodeMed Jul 9 '11 at 9:49
    
the problem is that the line if(min>pts[k]) is setting min to equal zero in the first iteration, as soon as it evaluates double min = Double.POSITIVE_INFINITY . Since all the values in this function are positive, if(min>pts[k]) never again evaluates to true, so the min rectangle marker remains on the top of the panel at the start index of the window. If we can get it to stop evaluating to zero on the first pass, we can eliminate this bug. Any ideas? –  CodeMed Jul 9 '11 at 10:51
1  
I am marking this as answered now, and I now consider this posting closed. The primary aspect of the solution involved changing maxIndex = x2 to instead read maxIndex = k(see my comment below). –  CodeMed Jul 13 '11 at 1:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

One approach is to scan backward through the sectionStartIndex..sectionEndIndex window, as shown below. It's not the solution, but it will let you see the green rectangle move up and down as it tracks the minimum.

for (int k = sectionStartIndex; k < sectionEndIndex; k++) {
    int j = sectionEndIndex - k;
    if (min > pts[j]) {
        System.out.println("minIndex, min, pts[" + j + "]: "
            + minIndex + ", " + min + ", " + pts[j]);
        min = pts[j];
        minIndex = x2Count;
    }
    if (max < pts[k]) {
        max = pts[k];
        maxIndex = x2Count;
    }
}

Addendum: Hoisting the array initialization out of the loop is one approach, as shown below. Note the use of a double divisor in scaling operations.

The more serious problem is evaluating the function in one domain, while sampling it in another. I'd separate the view (mouse coordinates) from the model (real numbers represented by double). Introduce methods to transform coordinates between the two, such as the *scale* functions seen here. Let the model evaluate the function as the mouse moves; optimize only if proven necessary.

Local: maxIndex, maxVal: 200, 326
Local: minIndex, minVal: 200, 79
class LocalMinMax {

    static double[] pts;
    static int visiblePoints = 5000;
    static int startX = 200;
    static int endX = 700;

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int lastX2 = 0;
        int maxWidth = 800;
        double hstep = maxWidth / (double) visiblePoints;
        int maxHeight = 400;
        pts = new double[visiblePoints];
        for (int i = 0; i < pts.length; i++) {
            pts[i] = (((Math.sin(.009 * i)) * (Math.cos(.004 * i)))
                * (maxHeight / 3d) * .95) + (maxHeight / 2d);
        }
        double max = Double.NEGATIVE_INFINITY;
        double min = Double.POSITIVE_INFINITY;
        int minIndex = -1;
        int maxIndex = -1;
        for (int i = 0; i < visiblePoints; i++) {
            int x2 = (int) (i * hstep);
            if (x2 >= startX) {
                int sectionStartIndex = i;
                int sectionEndIndex = (int) (endX / hstep);
                for (int k = sectionStartIndex; k < sectionEndIndex; k++) {
                    if (min > pts[k]) {
                        min = pts[k];
                        minIndex = x2;
                      //System.out.println("minIndex, min, pts[" + k + "], x2: "
                      //+ minIndex + ", " + min + ", " + pts[k] + ", " + x2);
                    }
                    if (max < pts[k]) {
                        max = pts[k];
                        maxIndex = x2;
                      //System.out.println("maxIndex, max, pts[" + k + "], x2: "
                      //+ maxIndex + ", " + max + ", " + pts[k] + ", " + x2);
                    }
                }
            }
            if (lastX2 != x2) {
                lastX2 = x2;
                if (x2 == startX) {
                    int width = endX - startX;
                }
            }
        }
        int maxVal = (int) max;
        int minVal = (int) min;
        System.out.println("Local: maxIndex, maxVal: " + maxIndex + ", " + maxVal);
        System.out.println("Local: minIndex, minVal: " + minIndex + ", " + minVal);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you very much for your help. It does not really fix my problem, but I appreciate the time you invested. Now that I think I have isolated the problem (see above), I will try to reproduce the problem with a smaller amount of code when I can spend time with this again tomorrow. If that exercise does not lead me to the solution, I will post a re-framed question in another day or so. –  CodeMed Jul 10 '11 at 22:08
    
I just reposted a revised version of the code above, which isolates the problem into a shorter, simpler segment that should be easier to debug. Can you see the bug now? –  CodeMed Jul 12 '11 at 0:51
    
Thank you very much. I will work with your suggestions tomorrow, and reply when I have some meaningful update or conclusion. –  CodeMed Jul 12 '11 at 6:58
    
Thank you for your suggestions. I did try breaking up the code as per the code you wrote above. But, as it turns out, I did not need the more complex functionality in your link. Instead, the missing link was to change minIndex = x2 into minIndex = k . But since you spent so much energy trying to help me, I am marking this answer as the correct answer. –  CodeMed Jul 13 '11 at 1:07
    
Excellent; I'd overlooked that. I would encourage you to post the answer for future reference. –  trashgod Jul 13 '11 at 1:14

As the function f(x) = sin(ax) + cos(bx) is (at least) twice differentiable, an alternative approach is to find the minima and maxima analytically. Wherever the first derivative is zero, the function will have a local extremum. The sign of the second derivative indicates whether the extremum is a minimum or maximum.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for taking the time to think of this, and to write it. As it turns out, my data is recorded in time series by a data collection instrument. I just used f(x) = sine(ax)*cos(bx) in the posting so that I did not have to bother readers with the need to download a data file. The sinusoid has maxima and minima that are good enough for debugging. –  CodeMed Jul 13 '11 at 1:03
    
Ah, that makes sense. A stable data set at execution time should simplify the problem. If it's stored in an array or suitable Collection, then retrieval should be O(1). –  trashgod Jul 13 '11 at 1:10
    
what does O(1) mean? –  CodeMed Jul 13 '11 at 1:13
    
Essentially, O(1) means in constant time, using this notation. –  trashgod Jul 13 '11 at 1:20

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