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I would like to pass a function as a template argument to another function so that it can be stored and called back later. In some cases, I want to pass NULL for the call back, but I'm having trouble. Here's an example of what I'd like to be able to do:

#include <iostream>
struct Foo {
    int i;
};
template <typename T>
T* T_new() {
    return new T();
}
Foo* Foo_new() {
    return new Foo();
}
template <typename T, T* (*func)()>
T* T_new() {
    if (func)
        return func();
    else
        return NULL;
}

int main(void) {
    // Works
    Foo* f1 = T_new<Foo>();
    std::cout << f1 << std::endl;

    // Works
    Foo* f2 = T_new<Foo, Foo_new>();
    std::cout << f2 << std::endl;

    // fails to compile, "no matching function for call to ‘T_new()’"
    // Foo* f3 = T_new<Foo, NULL>();
    // std::cout << f3 << std::endl;

    return 0;
}

I found this similar question, but that deals with passing null as an argument to the constructor, not passing null as a template argument, and the trick there (using (Foo*)0) doesn't work as a template argument.

Is there a way to work around this or do some tricky template specialisation or some other clever thing to get the desired effect?

EDIT:

The above was a simplified example that illustrated the problem I was having, but here's the concrete problem I'm trying to solve. I have this project I'm working on. This is a set of functions that make mixing C++ and Lua simpler for me (For various reasons I don't want to use LuaBind or the other existing functions I've found out there). The important function to this question is luaW_register<T>, near the bottom. This is a slightly out of date version, but it works in almost all cases. It doesn't work, however, if the constructor is private, which has just come when I tried mixing this with Box2D's b2Body (which needs to be made from a b2World). luaW_defaultallocator<T>() (and luaW_defaultdeallocator<T>()) still gets created since I'm using it as the default argument in luaW_register<T>().

My proposed solution was to pull the allocator parameter out into template parameters of luaW_Register. Then, if I want to use some other function to get my objects for a specific type, luaW_defaultallocator will not even be created. In cases like b2Bodys, where they can't create themselves at all, I would like to be able to just pass in NULL as a template argument (which seems perfectly reasonable, but the compiler is choking on it for reasons that are still unclear to me, it seems like if I can set a value to NULL anywhere else in code I ought to be able to for templates as well). A hack I initially implemented was to pass in a boolean argument to my function which would disable the ability to call Foo.new from my Lua code, but that doesn't stop defaultallocator from compiling, and if I can use the null check in and working the way I would like it has the nice side effect of letting me simply check if there's an allocator and use that to control whether or not the new function gets added to the lua table.

tl;dr: my goal was to go from this:

template <typename T>
void luaW_register(lua_State* L, const char* classname, const luaL_reg* table, const luaL_reg* metatable, const char** extends = NULL, bool disablenew = false, T* (*allocator)() = luaW_defaultallocator<T>, void (*deallocator)(T*) = luaW_defaultdeallocator<T>)

to this:

template <typename T, T* (*allocator)() = luaW_defaultallocator<T>, void (*deallocator)(T*) = luaW_defaultdeallocator<T> >
void luaW_register(lua_State* L, const char* classname, const luaL_reg* table, const luaL_reg* metatable, const char** extends = NULL)

to avoid instantiation of luaW_defaultallocator in some cases, but it's looking like it might not be possible.

The closest solution I've seen so far is to provide a function like luaW_cannotalloc<T>(lua_State*) which returns NULL and can be checked for in my luaW_register function instead of null. I suppose that would work, but it means more typing and needing to remember that function name, and NULL seems much cleaner.

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1  
Why can't you just pass a function which returns null? Then you can simply remove the if from T_new as well. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y Jul 9 '11 at 9:49
    
I don't know what "tricky template specialization" means to you. What's wrong with doing a partial specialization for the second argument being NULL excising the if and putting the else clause in the specialized version? –  Conspicuous Compiler Jul 9 '11 at 9:52
    
@Conspicuous: if you can code up a working example, please share. I couldn't figure it out. –  Alex Jul 9 '11 at 9:54
1  
@Conspicuous: Partial template specialization for functions is not allowed. –  Karoly Horvath Jul 9 '11 at 10:20
1  
BTW, this compiled fine on VS2008 –  Yochai Timmer Jul 9 '11 at 10:52
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This can be solved by using template overloads. Instead of having just one ´T_new` signature you´ll have one signature for the NULL case and one for the other:

// Unused signature, no implementation so using this will result in link error
template<typename T, typename F>
T* T_new();
// NULL overload (NULL is an int)
template<typename T, int func>
T* T_new()
{
    assert(func == 0 && "Signature should only be used with NULL");
    return NULL;
}
// Valid function pointer overload
template<typename T, T* (*func)()>
T* T_new()
{
    // I don´t think it´s possible with NULL functions now, but if it is
    // we'll handle that too
    if (func)
        return func();
    return NULL;
}

The trick is to realize that NULL is actually an int and use this to handle the NULL case in a different overload.

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2  
You cannot use partial template specialization of functions. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jul 9 '11 at 12:07
    
@David: thank you, edited my answer, now says overload instead of specialization. –  larsm Jul 9 '11 at 14:04
    
Using this hack seems like the best solution so far for what I'm trying to achieve. It's a little more work on my end since I actually have 3 function pointers I'm passing (so I need to make 6 prototypes) but it otherwise achieves the desired result. –  Alex Jul 9 '11 at 17:56
    
Will that work with c++ nullptr? –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 10 '11 at 12:10
    
@Alf: I've never used nullptr (or other C++0x features), but I think it is of type nullptr_t. If I'm right, a new overload template<typename T, nullptr_t func> T* T_new() must be added. –  larsm Jul 10 '11 at 12:52
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The problem for null-pointer is that a template pointer argument must have external linkage. And null doesn't have linkage.

How to make things work: It seems that you have selected the wrong tool for whatever it is you're trying to achieve.

Cheers & hth.,

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@anonymous downvoter: please explain the reason for your downvote, so that others can benefit. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Jul 10 '11 at 12:09
    
Your answer was not helpful as it did not provide any useful information, either how to work around the problem or an alternate solution that sidesteps the problem altogether. All you said was "You have a problem, solve it a different way", which is no help to me at all. I also disagree that I've chosen the wrong tool for the job. It may be the wrong tool for the example, but that's simplified to illustrate the compiler error I was seeing. See my edit for more details on exactly the problem I'm trying to solve, and if you think you have a better tool, let me know. –  Alex Jul 11 '11 at 6:27
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You can (I think) set up a constant of the appropriate type and use it:

(Foo*)(*make_null_foo)() = 0;

Foo* f3 = T_new<Foo, make_null_foo>();

Or in C++0x, you should be able to use the new nullptr keyword.

Or you can do what the comment suggests, and simplify the logic by just making an actual function that returns null, instead of special casing for a null function pointer:

Foo* make_null_foo() { return 0; }

Foo* f3 = T_new<Foo, make_null_foo>();

i.e. the Null Object pattern.

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Attempting to follow your first example yeilds this error: ‘make_null_foo was not declared in this scope test.cpp:40:26: error: make_null_foo cannot appear in a constant-expression`. As for the second solution, the reason I'd prefer to not do that is that I'd have to write a function for every place I don't want to be able to make Foo's. It also simplified things elsewhere in the code. –  Alex Jul 9 '11 at 10:05
    
Why can't you reuse the same non-Foo-making function everywhere? –  Karl Knechtel Jul 9 '11 at 10:07
    
I could, but I'd have to make it a template function, since this will be used on many different types. And I want some different behaviors if you're not allowed to make new objects, and if I can pass NULL then all I need is a trivial null pointer check to see if you're allowed to make new objects. I might end up going with that option if I can't find a better solution, it just makes my code a little less pretty and that makes me sad :-/ –  Alex Jul 9 '11 at 10:13
    
A problem with the first example is that (Foo*) is a type cast. It probably would work with just a Foo*. –  Bo Persson Jul 9 '11 at 12:02
    
Accursed function pointer syntax... >:/ @Alex: Have you considered not using templating? Runtime solutions tend to be more flexible. Actually, what are you really trying to do here, after all? –  Karl Knechtel Jul 9 '11 at 13:11
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It's ugly, but it works:

Foo* f3 = T_new<Foo, (Foo* (*)())NULL>();
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2  
Didn't work for me (g++4.3). –  vines Jul 9 '11 at 12:46
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I don't really think that templates make sense here, and I am not sure that you have really thought this through... why would you statically call a function knowing that it will return NULL?

Anyway you can do this:

template <typename T, T* (*func)()>
T* T_new() {
   return func();
}
template <typename T>
T* T_new() {
   return NULL;
}

Or if you need to go through intermediate templates (i.e. you might not know at a given point whether the function will be null or not, you can follow the null object pattern and provide a null-funtion:

template <typename T>
T* null_new() { return 0; }

template <typename T, T* (*f)() >
T* T_new() {
   return f();
}
// user code:
X* p = T_new<X, null_new >();

Alternatively, forget about using the function pointer as argument to the template and pass it as a real argument to the function:

template <typename T>
T* T_new( T* (*func)() = 0 ) {
    if (func)
        return func();
    else
        return NULL;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've added more information to the original question. My example was a very simplified version of the problem I was actually trying to solve to avoid including extraneous details, but people keep asking for my rational so I've included it. –  Alex Jul 9 '11 at 17:00
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