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When the following program is fead the following input (reading from cin):

1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

The output is surprising:

1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int arey[3][3];
    int i,j;
    for(j=0;j<=3;j++)
    {
        for(i=0;i<=3;i++)
        {
            cin>>arey[j][i];
        }
    }
    arey[0][0]=1;
    arey[3][3]=1;
    i=0,j=0;
    for(j=0;j<=3;j++)
    {
        for(i=0;i<=3;i++)
        {
            cout<<arey[j][i];
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

Can someone explain what I should change to get the same output as the input?

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1  
It is not clear what you are asking/what your question is. – Mat Jul 9 '11 at 11:52
    
@Mat: I think the Q is why the program does not output the desired output, @Melik4 stating the problem premise clearly does help though. – Alok Save Jul 9 '11 at 11:57
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Arrays use 0 based indices, so the valid range of indices for your

int arey[3][3];

are 0 <= i < 3 and 0 <= j < 3

So you need to change the condition in your for loops to be strictly < instead of <=

share|improve this answer
    
Dear bshields when we change code to this, it will be an Extreme loop. – Melik4 Jul 9 '11 at 12:12
    
I have no idea what you mean by that, but after looking at your input data, it seems like your loop indices are correct and your array declaration is wrong. Since you have 16 input values, you need to declare your array as 4x4 and then you can leave the loop indices alone (although the much more common way to write this is i < 4 as opposed to i <= 3) – bshields Jul 9 '11 at 12:29
    
ohhhhhhhhhhh! sorry! I had a mistake... thanks... – Melik4 Jul 9 '11 at 12:37

Is the matrix 3x3 or 4x4?

you created 3x3 but the loops run for 4 elements and you also update [3][3]

Basically your indexes overflow and you overwrite a different cell in the matrix.

Update: cheecked your input, use: int arey[4][4];

share|improve this answer
    
yes. I mean the 3x3... and I mean 16 numbers. – Melik4 Jul 9 '11 at 12:00
    
3*3 == 9 numbers. If you want 16, you need 4*4. – Mat Jul 9 '11 at 12:01
    
we just need 16 numbers.... so, if we change it to [4]*[4] we have to enter 25 numbers. – Melik4 Jul 9 '11 at 12:14
    
@yi_H: when we change code and it will be run in 3 loop, the numbers will be less than 16!!! – Melik4 Jul 9 '11 at 12:20
    
arrays are indexed from 0 to n-1. that's n numbers, and you use array[n] to denote that. if that concept was clear check the other answers regarding how loops work. – Karoly Horvath Jul 9 '11 at 12:24

I really don't think I understand your question, but this is wrong:

int arey[3][3];
...
for(j=0;j<=3;j++) // <= invalid
...
array[3][3]=1;    // out of bounds

arey is a 3*3 array. You can't access arey[3][?], that's out of bounds. The only valid indices are 0..2.

Once you've written past the bounds of your array, your program behavior becomes undefined.

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