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Say there are some elements floating around, and I'm trying to do some when I click ANYTHING(divs, body, whatever...) but the one specified (e.g. div#special).

I'm wondering if there's a better way to achieve this besides the following method I can think of...

$(document).bind('click', function(e) {
    get mouse position x, y
    get the element (div#special in this case) position x, y
    get the element width and height
    determine if the mouse is inside the element
    if(inside)
        do nothing
    else
        do something
});
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possible duplicate of How to detect a click outside an element? –  Felix Kling Jul 9 '11 at 15:27
    
$(':not(div#special)').bind('click', function(e) { ... ? api.jquery.com/not-selector –  Jim Schubert Jul 9 '11 at 15:28
    
@JimSchubert: Should work, I'd post it as an answer - it's simpler than the answers in the possible duplicate. However, it seems inefficient. –  Wesley Murch Jul 9 '11 at 15:29
1  
@Wesley: But it is not correct. The event handler will also be bound to elements inside div#special... –  Felix Kling Jul 9 '11 at 15:30
4  
@Jim: :not(div#special, div#special *) would be correct. However I would avoid binding an event handler to every element. Making use of event delegation is much better in this case. –  Felix Kling Jul 9 '11 at 15:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 38 down vote accepted

To handle the "do this except when this element is clicked" situation, the general approach is to add an event handler to the document which handles the "do this" case, then add another event handler to the "except this" element, which simply prevents the click event bubbling up to the document;

$('#special').on('click', function(e) {
    e.stopPropagation();
});

$(document).on('click', function (e) {
 // Do whatever you want; the event that'd fire if the "special" element has been clicked on has been cancelled.
});

See the event.stopPropagation() documentation. For those of you using versions earlier than jQuery 1.7 (as was the case when this question was asked), you won't be able to use on(); instead simple replace the 2 uses of on() with bind(); the signature in this case is the same.

Demo here; http://jsfiddle.net/HBbVC/

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2  
No offense, but that is basically the same answer as given in the duplicate I linked to: stackoverflow.com/questions/152975/… –  Felix Kling Jul 9 '11 at 15:44
1  
@Felix: I can see that now, but you hadn't posted the comment when I started writing the reply :(. –  Matt Jul 9 '11 at 16:16
    
Either way, the best answer I've found so far –  Eruant Mar 7 '12 at 10:59
    
Works perfectly. –  472084 Apr 25 '13 at 9:19

You could also do

$(document).bind('click', function(e) {
  if(!$(e.target).is('#special')) {
    // do something
  }
});

or if div#special has child elements you could do

$(document).bind('click', function(e) {
  if($(e.target).closest('#special').length === 0) {
    // do something
  }
});
share|improve this answer

I've done it like this in the past:

jQuery("body").bind("click", function(e)
{
    var obj = (e.target ? e.target : e.srcElement);
    if (obj.tagName != 'div' && obj.id != 'special')
    {
        // Perform your click action. 
        return false;
    }
});

This would only execute if you didn't click on div#special. Honestly there may be better ways to do it, but this has worked for me.

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1  
You don't need to test for e.target. It will always be there, jQuery normalizes the event object. And it will not work if div#special contains other elements. –  Felix Kling Jul 9 '11 at 15:35

you need to do different binds, there is no need to process all this clicks in one function

$('body').bind('click', function(e){
  bodyClickEvent();
});
$('div.floating').bind('click',function(e){
  elementClickEvent(this);
  e.stopPropagation(); //prevents bodyClickEvent
});
  $('div#special').bind('click', function(){
  e.stopPropagation(); //prevents bodyClickEvent
});
share|improve this answer

I wrote this today for an issue i was having as i don't like having click events bound to the document the whole time, so for my scenario this works, using callbacks from functions.

$('#button').click(function(){
        //when the notification icon is clicked open the menu
        $('#menu').slideToggle('slow', function(){
            //then bind the close event to html so it closes when you mouse off it.
            $('html').bind('click', function(e){
                $('#menu').slideToggle('slow', function(){
                    //once html has been clicked and the menu has closed, unbind the html click so nothing else has to lag up
                    $('html').unbind('click');
                });
            });
            $('#menu').bind('click', function(e){
                //as when we click inside the menu it bubbles up and closes the menu when it hits html we have to stop the propagation while its open
                e.stopPropagation();
                //once propagation has been successful! and not letting the menu open/close we can unbind this as we dont need it!
                $('#menu').unbind('click');
            });
        });
    });
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