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I'm running emacs 23 with c++-mode and having some indentation problems. Suppose I have this code:

void foo()
{
   if (cond)
     { <---
        int i;
        ...
     } <---
}

This seems to be the default behavior of the automatic indentation. However I'd like to change it so it'll be like this:

void foo()
{
   if (cond)
   {
      int i;
      ...
   }
}

Is there a way to do this easily by configuring c++ mode or my .emacs file?

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2  
For the record, this indentation mode is the GNU style. All GNU programs are required to follow this indentation style. –  greyfade Mar 19 '09 at 19:13
18  
yeah I read that somewhere, but I can't stand it –  Idan K Mar 19 '09 at 19:17
2  
It's generally good practice to code for your users, not yourself. Most people not writing GNU code use other styles. –  Daniel H Jan 26 '12 at 2:02
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4 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Check out the Emacs wiki on Indenting C

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I have the following in my .emacs file:

(defun my-c++-mode-hook ()
  (setq c-basic-offset 4)
  (c-set-offset 'substatement-open 0))
(add-hook 'c++-mode-hook 'my-c++-mode-hook)

You can determine which offset to edit by hitting [ctrl-c ctrl-s] on any line. On the first line with a brace after the if it will say substatement-open.

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2  
Upvoted for [ctrl-c ctrl-s] tip. –  user98166 Nov 29 '09 at 12:35
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This is mine... this matches the default setup for visual studio.

(defun my-c-mode-common-hook ()
 ;; my customizations for all of c-mode, c++-mode, objc-mode, java-mode
 (c-set-offset 'substatement-open 0)
 ;; other customizations can go here

 (setq c++-tab-always-indent t)
 (setq c-basic-offset 4)                  ;; Default is 2
 (setq c-indent-level 4)                  ;; Default is 2

 (setq tab-stop-list '(4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 40 44 48 52 56 60))
 (setq tab-width 4)
 (setq indent-tabs-mode t)  ; use spaces only if nil
 )

(add-hook 'c-mode-common-hook 'my-c-mode-common-hook)
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1  
Thank you so much! I've been looking for this everywhere... For as long as I can remember. –  nbolton Aug 13 '09 at 12:49
4  
(setq c-default-style "bsd" c-basic-offset 4) Accomplishes a lot of that in less lines. Although the indent-tab-modes should stay. –  Jesus Ramos Jun 30 '11 at 0:35
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Short answer: Put this line into your .emacs file:

(c-set-offset 'substatement-open 0)

Long answer: ...

For those of us who are new to emacs-lisp, there is a pretty simple method at http://www.cs.cmu.edu/:

  • Go to the line you want to indent

  • Type C-C C-O (that's the letter "O", not zero)

  • Press Enter to accept the default suggestion

  • Type "0" (that's a zero) for no extra indentation, press Enter

  • Type Tab to reindent the line.

  • Future "{" in this situation will have the correct tab setting, until you restart emacs.

The nice thing about this method, is that you can actually see the lisp code that you want to change. You can put in your .emacs file:

(c-set-offset 'SYNTACTIC-SYMBOL OFFSET)

Additionally, you may want to check out the program AStyle to automatically format C++ source outside of emacs.

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