Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

What is the difference between:

t.boolean :test, :default => true

and

t.boolean :test, :null => true

and

t.boolean :test, :default => true, :null => true

EDIT

Does the following make any sense?

t.boolean :test, :default => true, :null => false
share|improve this question
    
EDIT answer: It's ambiguous, and I wouldn't want to have to maintain it... ;) – Taryn East Sep 26 '13 at 7:35
up vote 19 down vote accepted

"null" means "are you allowed to enter a null value in this column"?

Whereas "default" means "if there is a null value in this column ... then use this default value instead"

So, for your examples:

t.boolean :test, :default => true

"this boolean column will insert a true if you don't bother setting a value for it"

t.boolean :test, :null => true

"this boolean column will let you set it to true, false or null - and it will stay the way you set it"

t.boolean :test, :default => true, :null => true

"this boolean column will let you set it to true, false or null... but if you set it to null it will automatically be set to true"

share|improve this answer

:default - The column’s default value. Use nil for NULL.

:null - Allows or disallows NULL values in the column. This option could have been named :null_allowed.

In the first option, if you don't specify anything, rails will put true In the second option, it will allow the value to be null. In the third option, both apply, the values can be true, false and nil

share|improve this answer

To answer OP's question:

Does the following make any sense?

t.boolean :test, :default => true, :null => false

Sure, let's take a look at the possible SQL events. (Bear in mind the default parameter you set takes effect on INSERT INTO statements like the following.)

INSERT INTO table_name id, test VALUES 1, NULL; # This should raise an error
INSERT INTO table_name id VALUES 1;             # This will default test column's value to true

So, it may make sense - if you want to explicitly disallow NULL values (should an attempt to made to set the value to NULL directly), and you also want to coerce missing or absent values on the test column to true during INSERT INTO statements.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.