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This is a general programming doubt rather than a specific one. But I would state it with an example. Suppose I'm creating a MessageBox class of mine own, and I want .Show() method to be implemented with say 21 overloads. I can do this like shown below.

public static void Show(string x){}
public static void Show(int x){}
public static void Show(param x){}
public static void Show(param2 x){}
public static void Show(string x, param y){}
.
.
.
.
public static void Show(param x, param y){}

Writing 21 such methods becomes quite a hassle. Is there any simpler way to do this? Something like,

public static void Show(string x, string y, int i, param p, ...... param21st z)
{
    if (//see the arguments and decide)
        //do stuff ignoring rest of the arguments;
    else if (//passed arguments are of these type)
        //then do this stuff.
    else if (so and so)
        // so and so.
}

Note: 1. I know there can be arguments like wouldn't it make my single function so big that it can exceed the size of separately written 21 different functions. No. In my case writing separately is a bigger hassle considering what I need to execute under the function is very trivial (only that the function may take a large number of parameters). Moreover this question is also to know about different coding techniques. 2. I understand the concise style i'm searching for has its demerits, in my case, its for a hobby program I'm creating for myself. So doesnt matter the usability. Just that i need to execute .Show() method with every combination of parameters possible to pass. (That makes writing separate functions so tedious).

Thanks.

share|improve this question
1  
This is the way to do it. If you look at .NET source, Microsoft does the same thing with most of their API. Passing a ton of parameters to a single method is a terrible idea. Because it's difficult to figure out what is actually required to successfully execute your method and it's a maintenance nightmare in general. You could create a set of objects to act as a parameter builder (for the lack of a better term) for different cases under which different values are passed. – Sergey Akopov Jul 9 '11 at 18:20
    
@Sergey Akopov Yes I perfectly understand that. Thanks for that. In my case, its for a hobby program I'm creating for myself. So doesnt matter the usability. I'm more interested in the implementation. I did not understand the second part of your comment. May be I should see code.. – nawfal Jul 9 '11 at 18:24
    
Usability still matters in code you write for hobby programs - What if you come back to the code in a few months or years? – William Lawn Stewart Jul 16 '11 at 5:34
    
@William Lawn Stewart, I can still manage it. Thanks for your concern, I understand your part. Moreover I learned an important and beautiful otherwise hidden aspect of C#. I would never forget this considering @Tim S. 's answer made my life so easier. I would use optional parameters always that I would not neither forget, nor find them any further difficult or complex than C#'s native method. Just to tell you, with optional parameter method, I can even pass parameters like normally. – nawfal Jul 16 '11 at 5:45
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The two good options I see are: 1. optional parameters, and 2. having the methods call each other as needed. Both will greatly reduce the amount of code you need to write.

Here's an example of optional parameters (VS 2010 or later). In string x = "", "" is the default for x. Defaults must be compile-time constants.

public static void Show(string x = "", string y = null, int i = 0, param p = null, ...... param21st z = null)
{
    if (//see the arguments and decide)
        //do stuff ignoring rest of the arguments;
    else if (//passed arguments are of these type)
        //then do this stuff.
    else if (so and so)
        // so and so.
}

When you call it, if you don't include all the parameters, you might need to name them so it's obvious to the compiler what you are and aren't specifying:

CustomMessageBox.Show(x: "hi", y: "there", p: myObject);

It's really just a compiler trick that automatically fills in all the non-included parameters with their defaults.

The other option is to have the methods call each other as possible. That way you're not duplicating the code 21 times, just however many major different ways it can run.

public static void Show(string x){Show(x, null);}
public static void Show(int x){//do something}
public static void Show(param x){Show(string.Empty, x);}
public static void Show(param2 x){//do something}
public static void Show(string x, param y){//do something}

An advantage of doing it this way is that you can pass things besides constants, such as new instantiations of objects or static readonly things.

share|improve this answer
    
terrific stuff! I wouldnt mind marking this answer. Let me try this. Awesome piece of logic bro.. – nawfal Jul 9 '11 at 18:28
    
They're new in VS2010? I'm sure I've used them in the past, unless I'm thinking of a different programming language (VB6? D:) – William Lawn Stewart Jul 16 '11 at 5:53
    
Optional parameters is a real gem. The beauty of it, if you have not noticed, is you can even pass the parameters without specifying which one, like we normally do, provided the order is maintained. Like this, in your eg, CustomMessageBox.Show("hi", "there"); or CustomMessageBox.Show("hi", "there", p16: myObject); ... Needn't specify everything – nawfal Jul 16 '11 at 8:23

You could do this, but you would have to know the type of parameters in the function.

public static void Show(params object[] values)
{
   if(values[0] == "something")
   //Do stuff
}
share|improve this answer
    
i'm reviewing that. – nawfal Jul 9 '11 at 18:19
    
@Magnus, you don't have to know the types. You can find them out using GetType(). – svick Jul 9 '11 at 18:30
    
@svick sure, what I meant was that you need to expect a certain value and type at a certain index to be able to do the logic of the function. – Magnus Jul 9 '11 at 18:33
    
@Magnus I could never imagine before that there would be so many different techniques. Yours works too. How can I mark all of them correct? ;-/ – nawfal Jul 9 '11 at 18:36
    
@nawfal just select the one you decided to go with. – Magnus Jul 9 '11 at 18:38

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