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I'm using Freeglut to design some basic games. However, I have been having some issues with keyboard input.

In some previous games I made, I had did something like this: (pseudocode)

class Key {

bool pressed;
void press() {pressed = true;}
void release() {pressed = false;}
bool isPressed() {return pressed;}

}

Key wkey, skey;

handleKeypress(unsigned char key, int xf, int yf) { //This is the function that glutKeyBoardFunc gets
    switch(key) {
    case 'w':
        wkey.press();
    case 's':
        skey.press();
    }
}

handleKeypress(unsigned char key, int xf, int yf) { //This is the function that glutKeyBoardUpFunc gets
    switch(key) {
    case 'w':
        wkey.release();
    case 's':
        skey.release();
    }
}

When I wanted to check whether or not a key was pressed, I checked wkey.isPressed(). However, this caused issues. For example, the Esc key was supposed to pause the game, and then pressing Esc from the pause screen was supposed to take the user to the main menu. However, pressing Esc directly took the user to the main menu because the user didn't release the escape key in that tick of the main loop.

To avoid this kind of issue, what is the best way to take (and use) keyboard input with Freeglut?

EDIT: By the way, this is C++

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The best way is to use something (almost anything) other than GLUT. GLUT is fine for doing a quick demo of "here's what this OpenGL function does", but for much more than that, it's best avoided, at least IMO. –  Jerry Coffin Jul 9 '11 at 21:14
    
I've been looking into using PLIB side-by-side with GLUT. Does this seem like a better idea? –  Draksis Jul 9 '11 at 21:37
1  
I haven't tried it, but my immediate reaction is that if it still involves GLUT, it's probably still a pretty poor idea. You might want to consider some alternatives to GLUT, such as a few I posted in a previous answer. –  Jerry Coffin Jul 9 '11 at 21:44
    
I've started looking at GLFW, and I seem to understand it a lot more than I did GLUT. Thanks for your help! –  Draksis Jul 9 '11 at 22:25
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1 Answer

How about you save a previous key state and a current key state for each frame? This way you can test if the previous key state was KEY UP and the new key state is KEY DOWN. This indicates that the key has been pressed. You can adopt this for a "key pressed" function - just test to see if the previous key state was KEY DOWN and the new key state is also KEY DOWN. A "key up" function would test if the previous key state was KEY DOWN and the new key state is KEY UP.

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