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The first time I encountered e.g. Ruby's Sinatra framework or PHP's Zend Framework, I wondered if there is something adequate in Java, it all seems so bloated here. Although there are myriads of frameworks around, I have found none so far that I deemed perfect for the kind of architecture I would like to implement.

I wanted to design a web application that would be heavy on the Javascript with most of the application logic implemented on the client, the Java back-end would more or less just serve as a data store or perform complex computations.

I did look through related questions here but I couldn't find the perfect answer, each of the suggested solutions had a quirk that would not match the requirements.

So this is what I am looking for, a open source framework with the following features:

  • Convention over Configuration
  • No XML configuration except for web.xml
  • Pure Java (no Scala, no Groovy, ...)
  • natural REST-style URLs such as /news/2011/july (no .do, no .jsp, ...)
  • REST-aware
  • it shouldn't force me to deploy on an application server (e.g. EJB should be optional)
  • session support would be nice but not mandatory
  • code generation as in Rails would be awesome but not mandatory
  • minimum of dependencies, small in overall size
  • MVC would be nice, but
    • I'd like to be able to choose the M part, choose the persistence libraries on my own (no bundling).
    • No automatically generated code for the view, neither HTML, Javascript, nor CSS
    • An integrated template language would be nice, but it should be minimalistic (simple control flow, access to template variables)
    • Layout support (i.e. you are able to specify a common template for similar views)
    • Free choice of Javascript framework for the views

Basically this would mean an MVC framework that does the routing for me and offers template support for the views, but the rest is fully modular, no magic. Is there any minimalistic framework that would provide this (or at least is modular enough to be configured that way)?

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How exactly does Spring 3 fall short? I think it satisfies all of the functionality you want. You can do a lot of annonation-based configuration. Is it too heavyweight? –  Ray Toal Jul 10 '11 at 1:05
    
@Ray Toal: I have to admit my experience with Spring was some time ago. At the time it felt monolithic and there was too much magic with dependency injection going on for my taste. But this may have changed. Would you have some links that could demonstrate how it fits the description? Happy to check them out, thanks in advance! –  emboss Jul 10 '11 at 1:14
1  
If your looking for frameworks that are not bloated I would not use Zend as a comparison. –  Perception Jul 10 '11 at 1:20
    
@Perception: OK, I should have been more specific and just refer to ZF's MVC part :) –  emboss Jul 10 '11 at 1:30
    
@emboss: The list of new features in Spring 3 is at static.springsource.org/spring/docs/3.0.x/…. It is true that Spring is massive and much more than an MVC framework but it is relatively non-obtrusive and is now packaged in several different jars, so working with MVC alone more or less is possible. (Aside: The annotations do simplify things a bit, though. If you are really into making Java itself feel lightweight, Lombok projectlombok.org is worth a look.) –  Ray Toal Jul 10 '11 at 2:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 14 down vote accepted

How about Play Framework?

Convention over Configuration

Play only has few configuration files. Most of its structure is by convention. For example the basic structure goes like this:

|
+---/app - All executable artifacts go here (java files, conf files and view templates). 
|     |
|     +---/model  - Your model Java classes.
|     |
|     +---/view   - Your view templates.
|     |
|     +---/controller - Your controller classes
|     
|---/conf - Contains all configuration files for the application. Initially contains application configuration and routing table.
|     
|---/lib  - Libraries your appliaction needs. Added automatically to classpath.
|     
|---/log  
|     
|---/public - Public stuff are your static assets that your server gives directly
|     
|---/test
|     
|---/tmp  - All your temporarily compiled .class files are here

No XML configuration except for web.xml

Play has no XML configuration, including no web.xml. It has a Routing file instead. See the example below what it uses for routing.

Pure Java (no Scala, no Groovy, ...)

It's pure Java, but you can use Scala or Groovy through a plugin.

  • natural REST-style URLs such as /news/2011/july (no .do, no .jsp, ...)
  • REST-aware

From the site:
Play is a real "Share nothing" system. Ready for REST, it is easily scaled by running multiple instances of the same application on several servers.

In fact routing in a Rest like manner is quite easy:

 # Play 'routes' configuration file…

 # Method   URL path         Controller

GET        /                Application.index
GET        /about           Application.about
POST       /item            Item.addItem
GET        /item/{id}       Item.getItem
GET        /item/{id}.pdf   Item.getItemPdf

It's not hard to guess which goes where once you get used to Play a bit.

  • it shouldn't force me to deploy on an application server (e.g. EJB should be optional)

It doesn't. In fact you deploy by saving your files. EJB are completely optional and so are .war, .ear and other forms of deployment.

code generation as in Rails would be awesome but not mandatory

I don't think it does much code generation but I'm not 100% on that. It does automatically create all required folders and instantiate a basic example page. I don't know if Rails generates anything else...

MVC would be nice, but
- I'd like to be able to choose the M part, choose the persistence libraries on my own (no bundling).
- No automatically generated code for the view, neither HTML, Javascript, nor CSS
- An integrated template language would be nice, but it should be minimalistic (simple control flow,

See MVC in Play

  • Think this is a minor counter point. Play models must use JPA or extend certain Model class which comes with Play. See Play framework-model for more info.
  • It doesn't generate HTML though you can use your template language inside your .html,.css,.js and other files to create dynamic pages.
  • I has inbuilt template language based on Groovy template language e.g.

    You have ${emails.unread ?: 'no'} ${emails.unread?.pluralize('email')} !

Other pros:

  • It's quite fun to programm in.
  • Did I mention the hotswap that allows you to redeploy your app by saving source files?
  • Great error logs.

Cons:

  • It's 51MB not sure if this qualifies as lightweight :/
share|improve this answer
    
That sounds good so far... I'll look into it, thanks! A minor blemish is Groovy though - but I guess you could just sell it as "the template language". –  emboss Jul 10 '11 at 2:31
    
It's not light weight I guess. The framework is 51MB (less than Zend but waaay more than Sinatra). Not sure how fast the server is, but you can ask about that on the forum. –  Daniel Fath Jul 10 '11 at 2:45
1  
You can avoid groovy as the template if you install "Japid Template Engine". It uses Java instead of groovy and is damn fast as this benchmark shows: jtict.com/blog/rails-wicket-grails-play-lift-jsp –  jassuncao Jul 10 '11 at 8:53
    
Nice. It's a bit bulky output, but it's quite fast, which is what the OP asked for. –  Daniel Fath Jul 10 '11 at 11:54
    
I think it meets definitely most of my requirements. Thanks for your nice analysis! –  emboss Jul 10 '11 at 22:53

I have used the Stripes framework on several projects in the past, and it sounds like it meets all/most of your criteria, especially the convention over configuration. There is no XML configuration- there is one stripes.properties file that has general behavioral configuration (it's a one time addition to your classpath). A one time edit to the web.xml is needed to configure the "Stripes Dispatcher", which is a Filter that routes requests to their appropriate action beans. ActionBeans are automatically discovered, so you do not have to even update your web.xml when you add more Action Beans. Your URLs are all set up using annotations on the action beans, rest supported, dynamic ActionBean bindings, Server-Side validation and conversion via built-in annotations for simple types, with the ability to create your own validation handlers and convertors for complex types. Works with JSPs and your custom JS/CSS libraries. Documentation and support forums are great. It's quick to learn if you follow their tutorial.

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Spring Roo: I found it easy to start with. It can generate UI code but its up to you to use it.

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