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Im creating a function called addingcustomer(n): so i need it to read through every single line in the .txt to make sure there is no repeated customer name only add the new customer name: my customer.txt:

[1. "Yuvin Ng”, “Columbia College”, 778]
[2, “Ali”, “Douiglas College”, 77238]

my current function:

def addingcustomer(file_name,new_name):
    f=open(file_name,"r+")
    for line in f:
        while new_name in line:
            return ("The Customer existed")
        while new_name not in line:
            f=open("file_name","w")
            f.write(list(new_name)+"\n")
            f.close()

how can i create a while loop to make it function as a addition of a list to the current.txt file. im so sorry i tried my best and im stuck.

share|improve this question
    
I fixed the indentation for you -- just add four spaces before every line in the code and it formats it nicely. –  Chris Gregg Jul 10 '11 at 1:31
    
Er, I guess @zeekay fixed it before me. :) –  Chris Gregg Jul 10 '11 at 1:43
    
You are using different types of quotes. Stick to the standard ones: "". Don't do something like: "Yuvin Ng” –  Aufwind Jul 10 '11 at 1:43
    
Thank you guys. problem solved. = ) –  Yuvin Ng Jul 10 '11 at 2:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all, you don't need the two while statements. Also, you need to close the file before you return. Something like this:

def addingcustomer(file_name,new_name):
    f=open(file_name,"r+")
    for line in f:
        if new_name in line:
            f.close()
            return ("The Customer existed")
    # the name didn't exist
    f.write(str(list(new_name)+"\n")
    f.close()
    return ("Added new customer.")

If I were doing it, however, I'd return either True or False to indicate that a customer had been added:

def addingcustomer(file_name,new_name):
    f=open(file_name,"r+")
    for line in f:
        if new_name in line:
            f.close()
            return False
    # the name didn't exist
    f.write(new_name)
    f.write("\n")
    f.close()
    return True

A bigger question is, what format is new_name in to begin with?

share|improve this answer
    
TypeError: can only concatenate list (not "str") to list # attempt to add non existed customer. I thought i changed new_name into a list so it can concatenate. –  Yuvin Ng Jul 10 '11 at 1:45
    
Traceback (most recent call last): File "C:\Users\Yuvinng\Desktop\Customer assignment 1\Customer assignment 2", line 77, in <module> function(c) File "C:\Users\Yuvinng\Desktop\Customer assignment 1\Customer assignment 2", line 26, in function print (addingcustomer("customerlist.txt",x)) File "C:\Users\Yuvinng\Desktop\Customer assignment 1\Customer assignment 2", line 64, in addingcustomer f.write(list(new_name)+"\n") TypeError: can only concatenate list (not "str") to list –  Yuvin Ng Jul 10 '11 at 1:47
    
ok i'm going to work on the script that you just gave me. Thank you. –  Yuvin Ng Jul 10 '11 at 1:48
    
I didn't think about the "\n" -- why do you need that? I've edited the second part of my answer. –  Chris Gregg Jul 10 '11 at 1:49
    
the reason i have "\n" so that when i add new customer name in my current customer.txt file it will have (eg. [1. "Yuvin Ng”, “Columbia College”, 778] [2, “Ali”, “Douiglas College”, 77238] [3, "new customer name", "UBC" ,4930201133] –  Yuvin Ng Jul 10 '11 at 1:51

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