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I've had a look around but have been unable to find a definitive answer to this question.

If I have a class that performs an async operation, when and how do I release it?

-(void)main 
{
     AsyncObject *async = [[AsyncObject alloc] initWithDelegate:self];

     [async goDoSomething];
}

-(void)didSomething:(Result*)result 
{   

}

When do I release *async?

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3 Answers 3

You could keep a private property to save the value, or, if you have control over the AsyncObject, pass the instance in the didSomething: selector. I think the first option is better since you know the object will be retained until you get your delegate call.

Option 1:

ClassName.m

@interface ClassName ()
    @property (nonatomic, retain) AsyncObject* async;
@end

@interface
//...

-(void)main 
{
 async = [[AsyncObject alloc] initWithDelegate:self];

 [async goDoSomething];
}

-(void)didSomething:(Result*)result 
{   
    [async release];
    async = nil;
}

Option 2:

-(void)aysncObject:(AsyncObject*)async didSomething:(Result*)result {
    [async release];
}
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If your object runs its asynchronous task on a background thread, or is the target of a timer, or uses GCD and is referenced within the scope of the dispatched block (the ^ {} kerjigger) then it will be retained for you for the lifetime of that background operation.

So the normal use case would be:

 AsyncObject *async = [[AsyncObject alloc] initWithDelegate:self];
 [async goDoSomething];
 [async release];

Now, it's possible to work in the background with an object that is not retained (e.g. by using a __block-scoped reference to the object with GCD, or by detaching your worker thread with pthreads instead of NSThread/NSOperation) but there are no typical use cases I can think of offhand where that would happen. In such a case, you should ensure that -goDoSomething internally retains and releases self for the duration of the operation.

(If somebody can think of a case where the object is not retained for you, please post in the comments and I'll update my answer.)

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks for the help guys, I did a bit of experimenting with NSURLConnection to see how it handled it (As you autorelease that and it will continue on with it's async operations).

Turns out at the beginning of every async step it internally bumps its retain count and at the end of every async step it internally releases itself.

This means that it can be sent autorelease/release and it won't actually be release until it has completed it's current operation.

// MAIN.M

-(void)main 
{
     AsyncObject *async = [[[AsyncObject alloc] initWithDelegate:self] autorelease];

     [async goDoSomething];
}

-(void)didSomething:(Result*)result 
{   

}

// ASYNCOBJECT.M

-(void) goDoSomething
{
   [self retain];
}

-(void) finishedDoingSomething
{
   [delegate didSomething:result];
   [self release]
} 
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Be careful. In this case, you're leaking async since you're (1) allocating it, then (2) retaining it. You're only releasing it once. –  csano Jul 10 '11 at 5:12
    
Well no, the caller is still responsible for either releasing it by their own mechanism or calling autorelease. Internally I'm bumping the dropping the retain at the beginning/end of each async operation. It's purely there to ensure that an async operation doesn't fail half way through and take the application with it. It also provides a convenient way for the caller to release it (Because autorelease now has the desired effect). EDIT: Sorry I see I missed the autorelease in my sample. Have added it. –  Tyler Jul 10 '11 at 5:22

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