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I don't see the purpose of a virtual member in a class other than safety. Are there any other reasons to use virtual when designing implementations? Edit: I erased the variable part.

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closed as not a real question by John Zwinck, Rob Kennedy, Bo Persson, C. A. McCann, Graviton Jul 13 '11 at 3:46

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3  
Safety? How does making a function virtual affect safety? Also, isn't this just a duplicate of this question? –  Nicol Bolas Jul 10 '11 at 2:49
    
Reputation system flaw in SO –  Ulterior Jul 10 '11 at 2:58

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There is no such thing as a virtual variable, only a virtual function or virtual inheritance. As such, lack of a purpose for such a thing seems like rather a good thing.

Edit: Virtual functions are how C++ implements run-time polymorphism. Trying to explain the uses/purposes of polymorphism is probably a bit beyond what will fit into a reasonable-sized post. The general idea, however, is that you can define some type of behavior in a base class, then implement that behavior differently in each derived class. For a more practical example than most, consider a base database class that defines things like finding a set of records that fit some criteria. Then you can implement that behavior one way with a SQL database (by generating SQL), and another with, say, MongoDB. The implementation for one will be quite a bit different from the other, but viewed abstractly they're still both doing the same basic things (finding/reading/writing records).

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Really? I don't understand why there should exist something that is useless. –  Mark Jul 10 '11 at 2:42
    
@Mark: nor do I. My point was that since there's no use for them, the fact that they don't exist is no real loss. –  Jerry Coffin Jul 10 '11 at 2:48

I shall answer... In code!

#include <string>

struct Base
{
    // virtual int MemberVariable; // This is not legal C++.  Member variables cannot be virtual.

    virtual ~Base() {} // Required for polymorphism.

    std::string NotVirtual()
    {
        return "In Base.";
    }

    virtual std::string Virtual()
    {
        return "In Base.";
    }
};

struct Derived: public Base
{
    std::string NotVirtual()
    {
        return "In Derived.";
    }

    std::string Virtual()
    {
        return "In Derived.";
    }
};

int main()
{
    Base* BasePointer = new Derived;

    std::string StringFromBase = BasePointer->NotVirtual(); // "In Base.";
    std::string StringFromDerived = BasePointer->Virtual(); // "In Derived."

    delete BasePointer;

    return 0;
}
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+1 thanks for the answer –  Mark Jul 10 '11 at 3:31
    
What is BasePointerToDerived? –  Mankarse Jul 10 '11 at 3:35
    
@Mankarse Sorry, that's my typo. It was left over from a more verbose "first draft." –  Maxpm Jul 10 '11 at 3:43
    
Base should have a virtual destructor. –  aschepler Jul 10 '11 at 3:45
    
In that case this answer has undefined behaviour. Base must have a virtual destructor. –  Mankarse Jul 10 '11 at 3:45

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