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Anyone got an idea on how to write an operator for a class that isn't a member function of the class?

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1  
Arithmetic operators, stream operators, et cetera are often not members of a class. –  Johnsyweb Jul 10 '11 at 4:45
    
@Jonathan See for example publib.boulder.ibm.com/infocenter/comphelp/v8v101/…. Yes operators can be global functions. –  Ray Toal Jul 10 '11 at 4:45
    
Yes I am looking for some sort of global function –  Mark Jul 10 '11 at 5:01
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Just make it a free function, or a friend function. A good example of this is operator<<:

class X {
    public:
    int x; 
}

ostream& operator<< (ostream& os, const X& x) {
    os << x.x;
    return os;
}

The benefit of making it a friend function is that you have direct access to private members, whereas a free function must access all members via public methods.

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what is const x&x? –  Mark Jul 10 '11 at 4:48
    
const X & x means that the parameter x is a reference to a const X. –  Chris Jul 10 '11 at 4:53
    
It's an instance of the class X, passed by reference. –  jtbandes Jul 10 '11 at 4:53
    
Also why does it have to be reference? –  Mark Jul 10 '11 at 12:00
    
@Mark: it doesn't have to be. Overloaded operators can take parameters by value if you prefer. –  Steve Jessop Jul 10 '11 at 13:25
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Arithmetic operators, stream operators, et cetera are often not members of a class. However, they may need to be friends in order to access private data members.

I prefer not to use friend and to expose methods that can be used by the operators instead. I believe this to be more in keeping with the Open/closed principle, as I could easily add a subtraction operator without editing the class.

These are handy for unit-testing, too (I can "inject" a std::ostringstream to test the output of print(), for instance).

Here is an example:

#include <iostream>

class Number
{
public:
    Number(int j)
        :i(j)
    {
    }

    void print(std::ostream& os) const
    {
        os << i;
    }

    int value() const
    {
        return i;
    }
private:
    int i;
};

std::ostream& operator <<(std::ostream& os, const Number& n)
{
    n.print(os);
    return os;
}

Number operator +(const Number& n, const Number& o)
{
    return Number(n.value() + o.value());
}

int main()
{
    Number a(4), b(5), c(a + b);
    std::cerr << c << std::endl;
}
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Just declare the global function with the operator name:

Point operator+(Point& p, Vector& v) {
    return new Point(p.x + q.i, p.y + q.j);
}
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1  
To use p.x and q.i you should make this function a friend of Point and Vector of course, or use getters. –  Ray Toal Jul 10 '11 at 4:46
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Basically, you can take the operator out of the class, and add a parameter to the beginning of the parameter list. In many cases, you will also need to declare the operator function as a friend.

For instance

class Foo
{
    Foo operator +( Foo const& other );
};

becomes

class Foo
{
    friend Foo operator +( Foo const&, Foo const& );
};

Foo operator +( Foo const& first, Foo const& second );

The friend statement allows the operator to still access any private or protected members needed.

Note that there are some restrictions on which operators can be overloaded in this manner. See this article for such a list.

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