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I'm interested in writing a program that takes control of keyboard and mouse in much the same way that one can with java.awt.Robot. I assume of course that there's no way to do this with standard libraries. Does anyone know of a good library I can connect to by means of FFI to achieve something like this?

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Why can't you use Robot? –  Abdullah Jibaly Jul 10 '11 at 5:23
    
@Abdullah Robot is Java. –  alternative Jul 10 '11 at 11:49
    
Why can't you use Java? –  hammar Jul 10 '11 at 15:53
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@monadic We're not asking why he can't use Java, we're trying to get a clearer description by prodding for more details. Don't always assume you know exactly what everyone is thinking. The OP obviously wants something like Robot but doesn't say how close it can be. Can it run in the JVM? Does it need to be cross-platform? –  Abdullah Jibaly Jul 11 '11 at 4:28
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@Ara Thanks for the clarification, that's what I meant by the original question. I know of course that it's a Java library but you should always clarify why you are looking for an alternative to something otherwise we can't give you good recommendations. –  Abdullah Jibaly Jul 11 '11 at 4:37

3 Answers 3

I don't have any relevant experience, sorry. My first thought would be to look at other UI libraries, such as GTK,

It looks like this may be already exported to Haskell via gtk2hs. If you know how to use the C foreign function interface, the XTest extension library seems to have what you want. ( http://www.x.org/releases/X11R7.6/doc/libXtst/xtestlib.html ).

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If you're running this in Windows take a look at Win32::GuiTest. In X11 you can use X11::GuiTest. Both are Perl wrappers over native system calls.

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If you use X11, you can use either XTest or the higher level Robot.

Here's an example of XTest:

import Control.Concurrent (threadDelay)
import Control.Monad (forever)
import Graphics.X11.Xlib
import Graphics.X11.XTest

main = withDisplay "" $ \dpy -> forever $ do
    sendKey dpy [] xK_a
    threadDelay (500 * 1000)

and here's an example of Robot:

import Control.Monad (forever)
import Test.Robot

main = runRobot . forever $ do
    tap _A
    sleep 0.5
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