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If I am using a ManagementObjectSearcher, I can easily wrap it in a using block:

using (var searcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher(scope, query))
{
    // ...
}

It is also easy to dispose the collection returned from the searcher, due to the fact that foreach automatically calls dispose on the enumerator:

using (var searcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher(scope, query))
{
    foreach(ManagementObject mo in searcher.Get())
    {
        // ...
    }
}

But ManagementObject also implements IDisposable:

using (var searcher = new ManagementObjectSearcher(scope, query))
{
    foreach(ManagementObject mo in searcher.Get())
    {
        // ...

        mo.Dispose(); // ?
    }
}
  • Do I have to dispose each ManagementObject instance returned in this scenario?
  • If I do, how do I make it exception safe?
  • Is there a way I can still use Linq in this scenario (and still properly call Dispose)? Especially with constructions like searcher.Get().First()?

Edit: A few more related questions:

  • Do I also have to call Dispose on the search result collection?
  • How about the searcher?

They both also implement their own IDisposable method, though it seems like the searcher only inherits the Dispose implementation from Component; it doesn't add its own dispose behavior.

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

ManagementObject inherits from System.ComponentModel.Component and you should call Dispose explicitly for all inherited from Component objects. You can use LINQ methods with your own predicates which invokes Dispose itself:

var first = searcher.Get().First(x =>
                {
                    bool result = Satisfy(x);

                    if (!result)
                    {
                        x.Dispose();
                    }

                    return result;
                });

This code is equivalent to:

ManagementObject first = null;

foreach (var element in searcher.Get())
{
    if (Satisfy(element))
    {
        first = element;
        break;
    }
    else
    {
        element.Dispose();    
    }
}

if (first == null)
{
    throw new InvalidOperationException("No match");
}

Where Satisfy is your own method.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry to bloat my question after you've answered it. Please see my edits. You mention the verbiage at the bottom that says you should always call Dispose on classes derived from Component. However, is there any reason for this for a class that doesn't add any of its own Dispose implementation? I see from Reflector that there is some interesting stuff in the guts of Dispose on Component, but it seems like it would only apply if I used it in some sort of "site" context. I can't tell if that applies in this case... – Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 10 '11 at 8:03
    
Checked it, and Site seems to be null. I'm not binding to on-Dispose events, so it really seems like it wouldn't do anything in this case. But I'd appreciate your two cents. – Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 10 '11 at 8:12
1  
I think that the following framework developers recommendations is a good practice. Really, you shouldn't use reflector or anything else to make any suppositions or assumptions about how exactly this version of code works. In MSDN Microsoft writes that you have to call Dispose for every object which inherited from Component. If you don't you may get problems in some complicated use-case or in further versions of framework. Ignoring the specifications is the first thing causes application fails in new version of OS or framework. – oxilumin Jul 10 '11 at 9:18
    
Great point. I will wrap it all in extension methods, anyhow :) – Merlyn Morgan-Graham Jul 10 '11 at 18:58

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