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This code gives me many headaches when compiling under GCC ARM. I am using it fine with MSVC++ compiler 2010. I get compile errors like:

Error 1 error : expected ';' before 'i' C:\Users\Ryan\Desktop\droplets\source\MultiList.h 62

Why won't my templated code compile using GCC?

#ifndef MULTILIST_H
#define MULTILIST_H

#include <list>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

/*
 A list of lists
 */
template <typename E> 
class MultiList {

protected:
    list<list<E>*>      m_lists;
    list<E>             *m_pCurrList;

public:

    MultiList();
    ~MultiList();
    /*
    Starts a new list internally, given the first element
    */
    void BeginNewList(E firstElement);

    /*
    Adds an element to the current list
    */
    void AddElement(E newElement);

    /*
    Removes a given element from it's place in one of the lists,
    splitting that list into two lists internally.
    */
    void RemoveElement(E element);

    /*
    Returns a list of all element lists
    */
    list<list<E>*> *GetLists() {
        return &m_lists;
    };

    /*
    Return the list that's currently being populated with AddElement()
    */
    list<E>* GetCurrentList() {
        return m_pCurrList;
    };

};

template<typename E>
MultiList<E>::MultiList() {
    m_pCurrList = NULL;
}

template<typename E>
MultiList<E>::~MultiList() {
    for(list<list<E>*>::iterator i = m_lists.begin(); i != m_lists.end(); i++) {
        list<E>::iterator j;
        for(j = (*i)->begin(); j != (*i)->end(); j++) {
            SDELETE(*j)
        }
        SDELETE(*i)
    }
}

/*
Starts a new list internally, given the first element
*/
template<typename E>
void MultiList<E>::BeginNewList(E firstElement) {
    list<E> *newlist = new(list<E>);
    newlist->push_back(firstElement);
    m_lists.push_back(newlist);
    m_pCurrList = newlist;
}

/*
Adds an element to the current list
*/
template<typename E>
void MultiList<E>::AddElement(E newElement) {
    m_pCurrList->push_back(newElement);
}

/*
Removes a given element from it's place in one of the lists,
splitting that list into two lists internally.
*/
template<typename E>
void MultiList<E>::RemoveElement(E element) {
    list<E>* found = NULL;
    list<E>::iterator foundIT = NULL;

    // find which list 'element' is in
    for(list<list<E>*>::iterator i = m_lists.begin(); i != m_lists.end(); i++) {
        list<E>::iterator j;
        for(j = (*i)->begin(); j != (*i)->end(); j++) {
            E listElement = (*j);
            if(listElement == element) {
                found = (*i);
                foundIT = j;
                break;
            }
        }
        if (j != (*i)->end()) break; // we breaked out of the inner loop
    }
    // now erase it and split the list
    if (found) {
        list<E>::iterator next = found->erase(foundIT);
        list<E> *newlist = new(list<E>);
        m_lists.push_back(newlist);
        newlist->splice(newlist->begin(), *found, next, found->end());
        SDELETE(element)
    }
}

#endif
share|improve this question
    
Nice code. What's your question? –  Flimzy Jul 10 '11 at 6:20
    
Post your errors! –  Alok Save Jul 10 '11 at 6:20
    
Hi guys, just updated with my question :) I'm really confused as this is working code, porting it to GCC/cross platform. –  Ryan Jul 10 '11 at 6:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It won't compile because it is chock full o'errors:

g++ -Wall /tmp/junk.c
/tmp/junk.c: In destructor ‘MultiList<E>::~MultiList()’:
/tmp/junk.c:62:9: error: need ‘typename’ before ‘std::list<std::list<E>*>::iterator’ because ‘std::list<std::list<E>*>’ is a dependent scope
/tmp/junk.c:62:34: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘i’
/tmp/junk.c:62:55: error: ‘i’ was not declared in this scope
/tmp/junk.c:63:9: error: need ‘typename’ before ‘std::list<E>::iterator’ because ‘std::list<E>’ is a dependent scope
/tmp/junk.c:63:27: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘j’
/tmp/junk.c:64:13: error: ‘j’ was not declared in this scope
/tmp/junk.c:65:23: error: there are no arguments to ‘SDELETE’ that depend on a template parameter, so a declaration of ‘SDELETE’ must be available
/tmp/junk.c:65:23: note: (if you use ‘-fpermissive’, G++ will accept your code, but allowing the use of an undeclared name is deprecated)
/tmp/junk.c:66:9: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘}’ token
/tmp/junk.c:67:19: error: there are no arguments to ‘SDELETE’ that depend on a template parameter, so a declaration of ‘SDELETE’ must be available
/tmp/junk.c:68:5: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘}’ token
/tmp/junk.c: In member function ‘void MultiList<E>::RemoveElement(E)’:
/tmp/junk.c:97:5: error: need ‘typename’ before ‘std::list<E>::iterator’ because ‘std::list<E>’ is a dependent scope
/tmp/junk.c:97:23: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘foundIT’
/tmp/junk.c:100:9: error: need ‘typename’ before ‘std::list<std::list<E>*>::iterator’ because ‘std::list<std::list<E>*>’ is a dependent scope
/tmp/junk.c:100:34: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘i’
/tmp/junk.c:100:55: error: ‘i’ was not declared in this scope
/tmp/junk.c:101:9: error: need ‘typename’ before ‘std::list<E>::iterator’ because ‘std::list<E>’ is a dependent scope
/tmp/junk.c:101:27: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘j’
/tmp/junk.c:102:13: error: ‘j’ was not declared in this scope
/tmp/junk.c:106:17: error: ‘foundIT’ was not declared in this scope
/tmp/junk.c:114:9: error: need ‘typename’ before ‘std::list<E>::iterator’ because ‘std::list<E>’ is a dependent scope
/tmp/junk.c:114:27: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘next’
/tmp/junk.c:117:51: error: ‘next’ was not declared in this scope
/tmp/junk.c:119:5: error: expected ‘;’ before ‘}’ token

Use -Wall and understand what its complaints are. A better question might be why did MSVC not complain?

share|improve this answer
    
Ah awesome, I didn't know about -Wall, wow you're right there are a lot of ambiguities. Okay I'll have a stab at making these corrections and let you know how it goes. Thanks –  Ryan Jul 10 '11 at 6:36
    
Great, got it working. Wherever I used ::iterator on a type defined using E, I needed to tell the compiler it was a type by inserting 'typename' before that declaration, because it didn't know and obviously didn't want to assume. –  Ryan Jul 10 '11 at 8:52
2  
@Ryan: help save the world (or at least StackOverflow) edit your question to incorporate what you learned. You can also create an answer to your own question and accept that instead (self-answers are good for SO). –  msw Jul 10 '11 at 9:26

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