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#include<iostream>
#include<string.h>
using namespace std;
char * reverse (char *);
int main()
{
    char * a;
    cout<<"enter string"<<endl;
    gets(a);
    cout<<a;
    cout<<"the reverse of string is"<<reverse(a);
    return 0;
}
char * reverse (char * b)
{
    int i,j=strlen(b);
    for(i=0;b[i]!='\0';i++)
    {
        char temp;
        temp=b[j-i-1];
        b[j-i-1]=b[i];
        b[i]=temp;
    }
    return b;
}

This program is giving no compile time error.But it does give run time error and does not give desired output. Please explain the cause.As I am not that much good in C++ so please forgive me if my question is not upto mark.

share|improve this question
    
What is the runtime error? And what is the output? –  Filip Ekberg Jul 10 '11 at 11:17
2  
There is no C++ other than cout. –  taskinoor Jul 10 '11 at 11:17
    
@taskinoor - Not so. Or at least, I'm fairly certain that there is no cout, stream << operator, endl, or using namespace in C. –  aroth Jul 10 '11 at 11:35
    
Please don't use gets. If you want to use a <cstdio> function, use fgets() so you can specify a size. With gets your user can inadvertently or purposefully overrun the buffer. (Edit: Sorry, cnicutar had already said this in his answer) –  jonsca Jul 10 '11 at 11:38
1  
@aroth, what I meant is that C++ is only used for outputting, but C++ string is not used. <<, endl and namespace can be removed if printf() is used instead of cout. Hopefully I am clear now :-P –  taskinoor Jul 10 '11 at 11:38

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You are not allocating memory for the string. gets doesn't allocate memory for you, so you're just reading into some random location - results are undefined.

Apart from that, there are more problems:

  • This is tagged C++ but it's more like C with cout (using string would be a better idea)
  • You are using gets instead of fgets. gets is quite dangerous and should be avoided.
share|improve this answer

You need to use std::string.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>
int main()
{
    std::string a;
    std::cout<<"enter string"<<endl;
    std::cin >> a;
    std::cout << "The reverse of a string is ";
    std::copy(a.rbegin(), a.rend(), std::ostream_iterator<char>(cout));
    return 0;
}

The Standard provides string handling that isn't insane like the C-strings you're trying to use, and it also provides reverse iteration quite trivially. In this model you don't have to allocate your own memory or do your own reversal.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 from me for a real C++ solution. (An alternative, and maybe easier for beginners, would be to use std::reverse() and std::cout << a.) –  sbi Jul 10 '11 at 11:47
    
Didn't even know that existed. I've never heard of a std::reverse :P –  Puppy Jul 10 '11 at 11:54

You need to allocate space for the first string otherwise you are pointing to the ether and overwriting God only knows what space. But, to be more idiomatic C++ may I suggest you use a standard string? Simply replace the char* with std::string.

share|improve this answer

In addition to the previous answers, you are actually reversing your string twice. You have to walk only half of the string.

share|improve this answer

Check the reference on the proper usage of gets(). You can't pass it an uninitialized char* and expect anything good to happen. You might have better luck with:

char a[256];
cout<<"enter string"<<endl;
gets(a);
share|improve this answer
7  
no, no, magic numbers are NOT the right solution! –  Puppy Jul 10 '11 at 11:21
    
@DeadMG - For a simple throw-away example of how to reverse a string (which is probably CS-101 homework) magic numbers are perfectly acceptable. And if you want to be really pedantic, using gets() is not the right solution either. Nor character arrays, for that matter (might as well use string instead). –  aroth Jul 10 '11 at 11:24
1  
@aroth: In my class I would regularly check submitted code against very long strings and subtract points for any program that would crash, rather than exit gracefully. –  thkala Jul 10 '11 at 11:26
1  
@aroth: No, they're not. There are some habits that you never, ever teach people for any reason, and magic-number C-string handling is one of them. Even if you have to interact with legacy code, std::string can deal with conversions back and forth. There's no excuse. –  Puppy Jul 10 '11 at 11:26
    
@thkala - That's fine if you're teaching third- and fourth-year students, but if you are doing that to CS-101 level students then I feel sorry for them. We're talking about people who are just learning the fundamental concepts of Computer Science here. Penalizing them for not understanding vagaries related to memory management and creating applications that never ever crash doesn't make sense. –  aroth Jul 10 '11 at 22:45

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